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Ultra-Low Dose of Rituximab Safely Eases Rheumatoid Arthritis Over Long Term: Study

"Ultra-low" doses of the drug rituximab may be enough to keep some patients' rheumatoid arthritis under control for several years, a new, preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that among 118 patients, low doses of the drug were comparable to standard ones in controlling flare-ups for up to four years.

The findings, the researchers said, suggest that some patients can try low...

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Might Help Save Hospitalized COVID Patients

As doctors around the world come up against severe cases of COVID-19, some positive news has emerged: New research shows the rheumatoid arthritis drug baricitinib may help reduce hospitalized COVID patients' risk of death.

Current standard-of-care medications aren't enough, said study co-author Dr. E. Wesley Ely, a professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville...

Beta-Blocker Heart Meds Might Lower Arthritis Risk

Commonly used beta blocker heart medicine may also reduce the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis and pain, a new study suggests.

"Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and affects 15% of the general population," said study co-authors Georgina Nakafero and Abhishek Abhishek, from the University of Nottingham in England.

In a joint statement to Healio Rheumatology

Does an Arthritis Drug Help Patients Battling Severe COVID? It Depends on the Study

Two new studies suggest that the jury is still out on whether the arthritis drug tocilizumab helps those with severe COVID-19.

Both reports were published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. The first, from scientists at the University of California, San Diego, found tocilizumab didn't improve outcomes or reduce the risk of death in patients with severe COVID-19 pneu...

Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Help Fight Severe COVID-19

Rheumatoid arthritis drugs may save lives of patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19, according to a groundbreaking clinical trial.

The findings, first announced in January, have now been peer-reviewed and published in a major medical journal.

"We are delighted that our full results are now published after peer review. This confirms the robustness of our findings, that t...

Arthritis Drug Tocilizumab Flops as COVID-19 Treatment

The arthritis drug tocilizumab doesn't help hospital patients with severe COVID-19, according to a new study that contradicts earlier research suggesting that it might aid recovery.

In fact, patients receiving tocilizumab had a higher risk of death, so the trial was halted early.

Tocilizumab blocks a part of the immune system (interleukin 6) that can become overactive in some COVID...

1 in 3 Americans With Arthritis Say Pain, Symptoms Persist

About 30 million U.S. adults live with osteoarthritis and the pain and stiffness it causes, a new survey finds.

And nearly one-third of these people said their symptoms are not well-managed, according to the Arthritis Foundation survey of almost 2,000 adults. In osteoarthritis, the cartilage cushioning the joints gradually wears down, leading to swelling, and limiting a person's abili...

Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Help Ease Tough-to-Treat Cases

A recently approved rheumatoid arthritis medication appears to be an effective second-line therapy when biologic treatments start to fail, a new clinical trial reports.

Arthritis sufferers treated with upadacitinib had a significantly greater reduction in their symptoms and disease activity than people treated with a standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), said co-resea...

More Patients Turning to Medical Marijuana for Arthritis Pain

Lots of people are using medical marijuana to treat their arthritis and other muscle aches and pains, often without consulting their doctor, a new study reports.

As many as 1 in 5 patients who consult an orthopedic surgeon for chronic musculoskeletal pain are using a cannabis product to treat them, Canadian researchers found.

"We found 20% had reported past or current use of...

In Small Study, Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug Appears to Help COVID-19 Patients

In the scramble to find medicines that beat back COVID-19, researchers from Italy report encouraging results from a small study on a rheumatoid arthritis drug already in use.

The drug, anakinra, may help quiet the runaway immune response known as a "cytokine storm," which imperils some patients with severe COVID-19.

"Until a vaccine is available, we urgently need to find a w...

Certain Diabetes Meds May Lower Gout Risk, Too

Medications called SGLT2 inhibitors lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. And new research suggests these drugs may have an added benefit -- lowering the risk of gout.

Compared with people taking another class of diabetes drugs (GLP1 receptor agonists), those taking the SGLT2 drugs had 36% reduced odds of developing gout, the painful condition that usually starts in t...

Experimental Drug Could Be New Option Against Arthritis

A new drug might be able to save a person's knees from the ravages of osteoarthritis, researchers report.

People taking the drug, code named MIV-711, had less bone and cartilage loss than others given a placebo.

"We know that bone slowly changes shape as knee osteoarthritis progresses," said lead researcher Philip Conaghan, a professor at the Leeds Institute of Rheumatic an...

Sick Americans Turning to Medical Pot for Help

More Americans use marijuana to help them cope with an illness than just to get high, a new study finds.

Nearly 46% of those who use pot say they do so because of a medical condition, compared with 22% who say they use marijuana for recreation.

And only 36% of those with a medical problem say they use pot to get high, compared with 58% of other users, resear...

Glucosamine Joint Pain Supplement Could Help the Heart

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Glucosamine has long been used as a supplement to help ease the joint pain of arthritis, but new research suggests its anti-inflammatory properties might also lower heart disease risk.

The finding stems from a lifestyle survey involving more than 466,000 British men and women. None had been diagnosed with heart disease when they were first po...