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Health News Results - 27

What to Expect During Rehab After Hip Replacement

Hip replacement is a major, arduous elective surgery, and rehabilitation afterwards takes time, according to an expert from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore.

It'll also take coordinated planning between yourself, your care team and your family and caregivers, said Dr. Savya Thakkar, an orthopedic surgeon ...

Extra Antibiotic With Hip, Knee Replacement Won't Prevent Infections: Study

Millions of people undergo joint replacement surgery every year. To prevent infection, doctors often give them a second antibiotic -- but new research suggests this can backfire.

Adding a second antibiotic at the time of hip and knee replacement surgery may actually increase infections, researchers in Australia found.

“Given the number of joint replacements performed in Austr...

Should Folks Get Hip Replacements in Their 90s?

If you are in your 90s, is hip replacement surgery too dangerous for you?

That depends, new research shows: While elderly patients have more complications and higher death rates after such a procedure, the surgery can be “appropriately considered."

That's because the risks for total hip replacement depend not just on patients' age, but also on their overall health and fitness.

Hip Replacements No Riskier for Folks Living With HIV

Hip replacement surgery is safe for HIV patients, a new study shows.

Some surgeons are reluctant to perform total hip replacement surgery on patients with HIV or AIDS, because of concerns about complications, including higher risk of infection, need for repeated surgery and longer hospital stay.

"Patients living with HIV are at a higher risk for orthopedic-related diseases such as o...

Fixing a Painful Joint Problem Won't Ease Mental Health Ills, Study Finds

Blaming your ailing knees for feeling down?

Unfortunately, even after physical pain eases, healing or fixing an injured joint often does not improve mental health, research shows.

A new study found that anxiety symptoms only improved when a patient had major improvements in physical function.

Depression, meanwhile, did not meaningfully improve even when the improvements to phy...

Low-Dose Colchicine Might Prevent or Delay Knee, Hip Replacements

An anti-inflammatory drug that has been around for over 2,000 years might help delay a very modern problem: hip and knee replacements.

That's the suggestion of a new study finding that older adults who used the drug — called colchicine — were less likely to need hip or knee replacement surgery over the next two years, versus those given placebo pills.

The study, published May 30...

Higher Price Tag Doesn't Guarantee Better Quality Joint Replacement: Study

The prices that health insurers agree to pay for joint replacement surgery vary widely and are unrelated to conventional measures of the quality of care.

That's the conclusion of a new study that found who is footing the bill is the biggest influence on the price tag.

Total joint replacements (TJR) — especially of knees and hips — are the most common in-hospital surgeries for U....

What Anesthesia Works Best for Hip Fracture Surgery?

Patients who have spinal anesthesia while doctors repair a broken hip have more pain and need more prescription painkillers afterward than those given general anesthesia, a new study finds.

Spinal anesthesia i...

Arthroscopy: A Viable Treatment Option for Painful Hip Joints

College basketball player Joey Liedel suffered years of debilitating hip pain that limited his ability to play.

As a freshman at University of Detroit-Mercy, he was in constant discomfort. Eventually, the Erie, Mich., athlete underwent hip surgery and took some time off to get comfortable on the court again.

The 6-foot-1 guard had arthroscopy -- a type of minimally invasive surgery ...

Having a Hip, Knee Replacement? Some Tips to an Optimal Recovery

If you're one of the estimated one million Americans having total hip or knee replacement surgery this year, some lifestyle changes might improve your chances of a good outcome, an expert says.

Lose weight safely through diet and exercise before surgery, said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Matthew Abdel. The ...

Black Patients Less Happy With Care After Knee, Hip Replacement

Recovering from hip or knee replacement surgery can be tough for anyone, but a new study from one hospital showed that Black patients were less likely than white patients to be satisfied with their care after the procedure.

Researchers reviewed survey responses from more than 2,500 people who un...

Is a Night in the Hospital Necessary After Hip, Knee Replacement?

For many people undergoing total hip or knee replacement, same-day surgery is a safe option, new research shows.

Among folks in overall good health, the study of nearly 1.8 million patients found similar post-op complication rates among those who had outpatient joint replacement surgery compared to those who spent a night or two in the hospital.

"Careful patient selection is the ke...

Certain Meds Raise Odds for Delirium After Surgery

Older adults have a higher risk of delirium after hip and knee surgery if they're taking anxiety, depression or insomnia drugs, researchers say.

"Our findings show that different classes of medicine are riskier than others when it comes to causing delirium after surgery, and the older the patients are, the greater the risk," said lead study author Gizat Kassie. He is a postdoctoral resear...

Hip Replacements on the Rise Among the Very Young

It may look like bad news, but a new study says it's not: The number of people younger than 21 who had total hip replacement surgery in the United States jumped from 347 in 2000 to 551 in 2016.

The increase wasn't due to a rise in the number of children with inflammatory arthritis, which often prompts a hip replacement in the very young. That suggests that non-surgical treatments to contr...

Beta-Blocker Heart Meds Might Lower Arthritis Risk

Commonly used beta blocker heart medicine may also reduce the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis and pain, a new study suggests.

"Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and affects 15% of the general population," said study co-authors Georgina Nakafero and Abhishek Abhishek, from the University of Nottingham in England.

In a joint statement to Healio Rheumatology

Dislocation Risk After Hip Replacement Higher Than Thought: Study

Hip dislocations are much more common in people who've had total hip replacements than previously reported, Danish researchers say.

The investigators analyzed data from Denmark and found that the rate of hip dislocations within two years after total hip replacement was 3.5%. That's roughly 50% higher than some previous estimates.

More than 40% of patients with dislocations had at le...

Obesity Ups Women's Odds for Early Hip Fracture

Obese women are more likely to suffer a hip fracture before age 70 than those who aren't obese, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data gathered from more than 12,700 women in Finland who were born between 1932 and 1941 and followed them for 25 years.

The University of Eastern Finland investigators examined the link between the women's body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of bod...

Knee or Hip Replacements Cut People's Risk for Falls: Study

People who have total joint replacement, or total joint arthroplasty (TJA), experience fewer falls than those who don't undergo the surgery, a new study finds.

"Osteoarthritis (OA) is the degeneration of the cartilage in our joints over the years," said lead author Dr. Ran Schwarzkopf, an orthopedic surgeon at NYU Langone Health in New York City. "As the wear and tear increases, pati...

Getting a Hip Replacement? Choice of Hospital Can Be Crucial

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown a spotlight on disparities in the U.S. health care system. But the issues are longstanding, and -- as one large study illustrates -- extend into a common elective surgery.

Researchers found that when hip replacement surgery is done at a "safety net" hospital designed to serve the poor and uninsured, patients' risks are higher. Of more than 500,000 Amer...

Could the First Drug That Slows Arthritis Be Here?

There are currently no medications that can slow down the common form of arthritis that strikes aging knees and hips. But a new study suggests a powerful, and expensive, anti-inflammatory drug could potentially do just that.

The drug, called canakinumab (Ilaris), is used for certain rare rheumatic conditions marked by widespread inflammation. They include juvenile idiopathic arthritis...

Less Smoking, Drinking Means Fewer Hip Fractures for Americans

In a rare bit of good health news for Americans, a new government study finds that hip fracture rates have fallen substantially since the 1970s.

Between 1970 and 2010, broken hips dropped by two-thirds among Americans in a decades-long health study. The likely reason? Researchers say drops in both smoking and heavy drinking played a significant role.

The improvement was true...

In Many Cases, Hip Replacement Also Eases Back Pain

If you have a bad hip and lower back pain, a new study suggests that hip replacement surgery may solve both issues at once.

Researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City focused on 500 patients who underwent hip replacement surgery and followed up with them one year after the operation.

Over 40% reported pain in their lower back prior to hip surgery. ...

People Die When Hospital Bed Shortages Force Patients Out

When patients are pushed out of the hospital after hip surgery to make room for others, the odds of dying increase, according to a recent study from Norway.

When beds are in short supply, patients are forced out, researchers say. Fridays, the day before holidays and times when hospitals are overbooked are prime times for patients to be discharged, they report.

"Patients wh...

A New Hip or Knee Can Do a Marriage Good, Study Finds

After people have a hip or knee replacement surgery, doctors expect these patients will get relief from joint pain, get around easier and once again enjoy the activities they love.

Now, a new study shows that patients' partners -- and thereby their marriage -- also reaped the benefits of the surgery.

"It was obvious that [patients] have less suffering and they can be more a...

Study Spots Ties Between Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other Diseases

People with inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis -- and people with rheumatoid arthritis are at added risk for heart disease, blood clots and sleep apnea, researchers say.

Their findings could improve understanding of how rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops and also lead to earlier detection and screening for other...

Steroid Shots for Painful Joints May Make Matters Worse

Corticosteroid shots are often used to ease arthritis pain, but a new study suggests they may be riskier than thought.

Researchers found that among patients who had the treatment at their center, 8% had complications. Most often, that meant a worsening in cartilage breakdown in the joint. But a small number of patients suffered bone loss or stress fractures.

Traditionall...

Most Hip, Knee Replacements Last Decades, Study Finds

If you need a new hip or knee, take heart: The vast majority of these joint replacements last decades, new research shows.

The conclusion stems from an exhaustive review of several hundred thousand joint replacements in Australia, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and New Zealand.

The researchers followed nearly 216,000 hip replacement patients for 15 years. They also tracked...