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TUESDAY, April 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced a ban on the sale of all pelvic mesh products.

The surgical mesh is typically used to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and incontinence, but reported side effects have included permanent incontinence, severe discomfort and an inability to have sex.

"In order for these mes...

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For women who need relief from bladder control problems, behavioral therapies are a better bet than medication, a new research review finds.

In an analysis of 84 clinical trials, researchers found that overall, women were better off with behavioral approaches to easing urinary incontinence than relying on medication.

Study patients ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of older American women have urinary incontinence, but many have not talked to a doctor about it, a new national poll shows.

More than 1,000 women, aged 50 to 80, were asked questions about their bladder control. The poll found that 43 percent of those in their 50s and 60s had urinary incontinence. That percentage jumped to 51 per...

MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines now recommend yearly urinary incontinence screening for all women.

But some experts say such screening needs to be introduced with caution.

Urinary incontinence (loss of bladder control) affects about 51 percent of women and can harm their physical, functional and social well-being, according to the American College of...

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga can help older women who fight frequent bouts of urinary incontinence, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a small study of participants in yoga classes specifically designed to help older women with urinary incontinence. They were between the ages of 55 and 83 (average age: 66), and none practiced yoga before joining the study....

WEDNESDAY, May 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery to repair so-called pelvic floor disorder often fails within five years -- but many women still say the procedure improved their quality of life, a new study finds.

"We may be at the point where we need to think of treating prolapse as treating a chronic disease that's likely to return over time," said study lead author Dr. J. Eric Je...