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Health News Results - 6

Having a child with cancer doesn't appear to affect parents' risk of splitting up or their plans to have more kids.

That's the conclusion of a Danish study that compared more than 12,400 parents of children diagnosed with cancer between 1982 and 2014 to nearly 70,000 parents whose kids were cancer-free.

Parents were followed until 10 years after a child's cancer diagnosis --...

Your gender and marital status hold telling clues about your risk of dying of heart disease, a large British study suggests.

It found that widowed and divorced men have significantly higher odds of death due to heart disease than women of the same marital status. But single men are more likely to survive heart failure than single women.

Compared to widows, men whose spouses ...

Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adults.

"As a pediatrician going thro...

For some people, the stress of dealing with a particularly rough patch in life or trauma may also strain the heart, a large new study suggests.

The research, based on over 1.6 million Swedish adults, found that those diagnosed with a stress-related disorder faced a higher risk of suffering a heart attack or other cardiovascular trouble over the next year.

The disorders range...

There's lots to be concerned about when it comes to kids and modern forms of communication, such as social isolation and cyberbullying.

But a new study reports a bright side to all that texting and social media -- it keeps children connected to their parents after a divorce.

The researchers also found that when kids and the parent no longer living at home stayed in contact, ...

Teens, especially girls, whose parents are religious may be less likely to die by suicide, no matter how they feel about religion themselves, new research suggests.

The lower suicide risk among those raised in a religious home is independent of other common risk factors, including whether parents suffered from depression, showed suicidal behavior or divorced, the Columbia University ...