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Results for search "Anosmia (Poor Sense Of Taste Or Smell)".

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Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, it's become clear that many people with the infection lose their sense of smell and taste. And doctors are concerned that some will never get back to normal.

At this point, it's hard to know how common the symptom is. First, there were anecdotal reports of COVID-19 patients who had lost their ability to smell or taste, said Dr. Nicholas Rowan,...

Sense of smell most often diminishes by the third day of infection with the new coronavirus, and many patients also lose their sense of taste at the same time, a new study finds.

The findings may help identify patients most likely to benefit from antiviral treatment, according to the researchers.

"The relationship between decreased sense of smell and the rest of the COVID-19...

Loss of smell is more likely to occur in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 than in those with more severe illness, a new study finds.

This information could give health care providers an early indication of which patients may require hospitalization, according to the University of California, San Diego Health researchers.

"One of the immediate challenges for health car...

Like your sweets really sweet? Try enjoying them with a cup o' joe.

Coffee makes sweet foods taste even sweeter, a new study shows.

European researchers tested 156 volunteers' sense of taste and smell before and after they drank coffee. Their sensitivity to smell didn't change, but coffee did heighten their sense of taste.

And this was true whether they dra...

Here's a clue that you may have coronavirus that might surprise you: a loss of your sense of smell.

Groups representing ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists in Britain and the United States have issued guidances that a sudden loss of a person's sense of smell may be a sign of infection with the new coronavirus.

It's not a completely unexpected finding, since a temporary in...

Could you imagine not being able to smell bacon frying, or freshly cut grass, or the presence of smoke?

People who lose their sense of smell face difficulties that can affect their daily lives and put their health and safety at risk, a new British study suggests.

It included 71 patients, ages 31 to 80, who lost their sense of smell. They reported a number of problems -- from...

A boy who wondered if snakes flick their tongues to smell prompted a surprising new discovery about how human senses work.

Turns out your tongue helps you smell, according to researchers at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia -- a team that included the curious 12-year-old's dad.

Taste and smell had been thought to be independent senses that didn't interact un...

Don't blame a loss of taste on your mouth, new research suggests.

Instead, most people can thank their nose for the problem, the study authors said.

The research team at the Virginia Commonwealth University's Smell and Taste Disorders Center examined the records of 358 patients who were evaluated for a taste disorder or combined taste/smell disorder between 1980 and 2017.

Unpleasant phantom odors haunt many older Americans, a new study finds.

Of more than 7,400 people over age 40 who took part in a federal health survey, 6.5 percent said they experience nasty odors -- such as burning hair or the reek of an ashtray -- from nowhere. That's 1 in 15 people.

As folks age, their ability to identify odors tends to decrease, but their detection of p...