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Health News Results - 6

FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Head and neck cancers among a group of first responders to the 9/11 World Trade Center terrorist attacks are significantly higher than expected, a new study says.

Rutgers University researchers found that diagnoses of these cancers increased 40 percent in a group of WTC workers and volunteers over a four-year period.

The findings sug...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in urban areas with heavy air pollution could increase your risk for mouth cancer, a new study says.

Middle-aged men living in 64 municipalities throughout Taiwan were more likely to develop oral cancer if they lived in places with high levels of air pollutants, the researchers report.

Those exposed to the highest levels of...

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The increased risk of cancer in people with diabetes is higher for women than men, a new study finds.

Previous research identified the link between diabetes and cancer risk, but this study looked at whether that risk differs between men and women.

The takeaway: Among people with diabetes, women have a 6 percent higher risk of cancer ...

TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who have a few drinks a week tend to live a bit longer than teetotalers do -- but even moderate drinking may raise the risk of certain cancers, a large, new study finds.

The research is the latest to look at the question: What level of drinking might be "healthy"?

It's a complicated issue to study, and that's led to some conf...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Human papilloma virus (HPV) could be lurking in your throat.

It's known that strains of the virus can cause cervical cancer. And the virus can also cause certain forms of head and neck cancer, according to researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York.

Testing can detect HPV before it leads to cervical ca...

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking and oral sex may be a deadly combo that raises a man's risk for head and neck cancer, a new study suggests.

The key factor is transmission of oral strains of the cancer-linked human papillomavirus (HPV), which can be passed through oral sex.

In fact, men who smoke and have five or more partners with whom they've had oral sex ...

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Wellness Library Results - 2

Rick Bender was 12 when he stuck the first pinch of snuff between his cheek and gum. He was 26 when doctors diagnosed him with oral cancer and removed half of his jaw, a third of his tongue, and part of his neck. "I always thought smokeless tobacco was the safer alternative to cigarettes," says Bender, now 38. "'Smokeless' sounds so harmless. You know, no smoke, no fire." An estimated 7.6 milli...

Approximately 37,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer annually, and just over half will be alive five years later. These startling statistics from the Oral Cancer Foundation tell a warning tale, but there is some good news, too. If caught early, oral cancer is highly treatable. According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, the high death rate of oral cancer is due to its usually being discover...

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