New features, new look and now mobile-responsive! No need to re-register.
Logo

Get Healthy!

Kids' Dental Health: Quiz

  • Chris Woolston, M.S.
  • Posted March 11, 2013

1. You should start brushing your child's teeth as soon as the first one appears.

____True

____False

2. According to the American Dental Association, when should you schedule your child's first dental appointment?

a. At 1 year

b. Before the child's first birthday

c. Soon after the child's second birthday

d. Soon after the child's third birthday

3. It doesn't matter if a child gets cavities in his baby teeth because these fall out anyway.

____True

____False

4. How can you help prevent baby bottle tooth decay?

a. Don't let your baby go to sleep with a bottle.

b. Don't put soda or other sweetened drinks in a bottle.

c. Encourage your child to drink from a cup as soon as possible, usually by age one.

d. All of the above

5. Thumb sucking isn't likely to harm baby teeth.

____True

____False

6. Pure fruit juice can harm teeth.

____True

____False

Answers

1. You should start brushing your child's teeth as soon as the first one appears.True of false?

The correct answer is: True

As soon your child has teeth, you should start brushing them gently twice a day with a soft, wet toothbrush. Children younger than 2 should not use fluoride toothpaste unless a dentist recommends it.

2. According to the American Dental Association, when should you schedule your child's first dental appointment?

The correct answer is: b. Before the child's first birthday

An early visit to the dentist can help prevent problems down the road. The dentist will examine your child's teeth, clean them (if necessary), and help you come up with a strategy for preventing cavities in the future. You may want to schedule a visit with the dentist as soon as your child's first tooth appears, which might be as early as 6 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

3. It doesn't matter if a child gets cavities in his baby teeth because these fall out anyway.

The correct answer is: False

You can't expect a toddler to learn to talk clearly or try his first bite of corn on the cob without a healthy set of teeth. Just as important, baby teeth help create space for permanent teeth. If your child's baby teeth rot away or fall out too early, he can experience severe pain and his permanent teeth may come in crowded or crooked. That's why taking good care of baby teeth paves the way for a confident smile later on.

4. How can you help prevent baby bottle tooth decay?

The correct answer is: d. All of the above

Baby bottle tooth decay is one of the biggest threats to young teeth. It can occur whenever a baby or toddler spends too much time sucking on bottles that contain sugary liquids, including juice and milk. Never putting a baby to sleep with a bottle (or removing it after 15 minutes) is one of the best ways to prevent this decay.

5. Thumb sucking isn't likely to harm baby teeth.

The correct answer is: True.

Thumb sucking is a soothing hobby for many young children, and it won't harm their young teeth. Permanent teeth, however, are another story. If your child is still sucking his thumb when permanent teeth come in -- usually around age 6 or 7 -- the teeth may come in crooked. Fortunately, most children stop sucking their thumbs by age 4. If your child has trouble giving up the habit, praise or reward him for keeping his thumb out of his mouth. If this doesn't work, ask your dentist for advice.

6. Pure fruit juice can harm teeth.

The correct answer is: True.

Pure fruit juice is loaded with vitamins, but it's also loaded with sugar. In addition to tooth decay, an overload of juice can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and flatulence. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children shouldn't drink fruit juice until they are at least 6 months old. Children under 7 should be limited to four or six ounces of juice each day.

References

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Dental care for your baby.

American Academy of Pediatrics. News release: AAP warns parents and pediatricians that fruit juice is not always the healthiest choice.

Oklahoma Dental Association. Your child's first trip to the dentist.

American Dental Association. Life Stages: Parents. http://www.ada.org/public/manage/stages/parents.asp

Health News is provided as a service to Shelby Drugstore, Inc. site users by HealthDay. Shelby Drugstore, Inc. nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please seek medical advice directly from your pharmacist or physician.
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay All Rights Reserved.