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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Long COVID Risk Has Declined Over the Pandemic and Vaccines May Be Key

Long COVID Risk Has Declined Over the Pandemic and Vaccines May Be Key

You're far less likely to develop Long COVID now than you were in the midst of the pandemic, promising new data shows.

Changes in strains of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are playing a role in the lowered risk, but so are the proven benefits of vaccination, the study authors said.

“The research on declining rates of l...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2024
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Irregular Sleep Could Raise Your Odds for Diabetes

Irregular Sleep Could Raise Your Odds for Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2024 (HeathDay News) -- Sleeping long hours one night but only a few hours the next can be unhealthy, with a new study finding "irregular" sleep patterns could be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

The results "underscore the importance of consistent sleep patterns as a strategy to reduce type 2 diabetes," said study le...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Feds Issue Warnings on 'Copycat' Delta-8 Products That Mimic Popular Foods

Feds Issue Warnings on 'Copycat' Delta-8 Products That Mimic Popular Foods

In a joint effort to curb the illegal sales of food products containing delta-8 THC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday they have warned five companies to stop marketing such products.

Because the packaging for these THC edibles mimics that of popular snack foods, the FDA said it is concerne...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Two Years Later, 988 Crisis Line Has Answered 10 Million Requests

Two Years Later, 988 Crisis Line Has Answered 10 Million Requests

Just two years after the launch of the nation's three-digit crisis hotline, more than 10 million calls, texts and chat messages have been fielded by counselors, U.S. health officials announced Tuesday.

Introduced in July 2022 to simplify emergency calls and help counter a burgeoning mental health crisis in the United States, 988 was toute...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Are You & Your Partner in a 'Sleep Divorce?' You're Not Alone

Are You & Your Partner in a 'Sleep Divorce?' You're Not Alone

Many couples may be painfully familiar with the scenario: One partner snores loudly all night long, so the other partner seeks better sleep in another bed.

Now, a new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) shows just how common the practice of "sleep divorce" is: 29% of Americans have opted to sleep in another bed in t...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Biking, Walking to Work a Game-Changer for Health

Biking, Walking to Work a Game-Changer for Health

Bicycling to work can vastly improve your health and reduce your risk of death, a new study shows.

People who bike commute have a 47% lower overall risk of an early death, researchers found.

They also are less likely to develop heart disease, cancer and mental health problems, results show.

Walking to work also conferred some h...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Does Exercise Near Bedtime Really Disrupt Sleep? Maybe Not

Does Exercise Near Bedtime Really Disrupt Sleep? Maybe Not

Exercise near bedtime won't necessarily wreck a person's sleep, a new study says.

Intense exercise is typically discouraged as bedtime approaches, since such activity can disturb sleep by increasing body temperature and heart rate, researchers said.

But short resistance exercise "activity breaks" at regular intervals can actually imp...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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What Is 'Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome' and Can It Be Treated?

What Is 'Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome' and Can It Be Treated?

It's a little known health condition that can become a nightmare: Regular and sudden episodes of intense nausea and vomiting.

Now, new clinical guidance urges people to take notes and speak up if they think they have the condition, known as cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS).

About 2% of people experience CVS, but it can take years befor...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Could Contact Sports Raise Risks for a Parkinson's-like Disorder?

Could Contact Sports Raise Risks for a Parkinson's-like Disorder?

Autopsies of deceased boxers and pro football players have long confirmed that repeat head injuries can lead to a devastating brain condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Now, research supports the notion that contact sports can also raise the odds for a Parkinson's-like disease, called parkinsonism, in athletes already...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Targeted Steps Could Slash Salmonella Danger in Poultry

Targeted Steps Could Slash Salmonella Danger in Poultry

Most salmonella outbreaks linked to poultry are caused by just a few strains of the diarrhea-causing bacteria, a new study finds.

There are more than 2,600 different types of salmonella bacteria, but only three strains are most likely to cause illness in humans, researchers report.

Interestingly, one of the most common types found in...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Brain Changes Seen in Kids With Conduct Disorder

Brain Changes Seen in Kids With Conduct Disorder

Defiance, tantrums, aggression: All signs of a condition called conduct disorder, which Mental Health America says affects up to 16% of boys and 9% of girls.

Now, research is revealing real differences in the brain structure of children and youths with conduct disorder, compared to those without the condition.

Specifically, the study...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Starving Pre-Performance Won't Bring Medals: Study

Starving Pre-Performance Won't Bring Medals: Study

Dropping weight prior to competition is a common practice among athletes.

But starving oneself prior to an intense athletic event is likely a wrongheaded, self-defeating practice, a new study warns.

Triathletes who ate less prior to competition lost more muscle mass and performed poorly, compared to their function after they followed...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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Science Helps Make 'Space Food' More Appealing

Science Helps Make 'Space Food' More Appealing

Food tends to taste bland in space, astronauts have reported, making it tough for them to eat enough to stay healthy.

Focusing on foods' smell might help overcome this problem, a new study says.

Aroma plays a big role in the flavor of food, and researchers found that certain scents might be more powerful in the cramped confines of a ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 17, 2024
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'Staying Regular' Is Good for Good Health

'Staying Regular' Is Good for Good Health

Being regular is good for you, a new study shows.

Predictable bowel movements could be tied to your long-term health, allowing your body to absorb essential nutrients without producing harmful organ-damaging toxins, researchers found.

The "Goldilocks zone"of bowel movement frequency, once or twice a day, is associated with better hea...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer May Lower Dementia Risk

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer May Lower Dementia Risk

Hormone therapy for breast cancer might reduce a woman's later risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds.

Overall, hormone therapy is associated with a 7% lower risk of developing Alzheimer's or a related dementia later in life, according to findings published July 16 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

Howev...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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Parents, Take Note: Survey Shows Teens Need More Support Than They Get

Parents, Take Note: Survey Shows Teens Need More Support Than They Get

As millions of American teens continue to struggle with their mental health, a new survey reveals a sizable gap between how much support teens say they get and how much support their parents think they are getting.

In the report, published Tuesday by the National Center for Health Statistics, just over a quarter of teens said they always ...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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Long COVID Rates Are Expected to Decline: Study

Long COVID Rates Are Expected to Decline: Study

People's odds for Long COVID appear to be declining with the advent of new variants of the virus, along with repeat infections and vaccinations, new research shows.

That suggests that the average person's chances of developing long-term symptoms is falling over time, concluded a team from Germany.

"Although the cause of post-COVID-1...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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Blood Test Shows Promise in Spotting Preeclampsia Before Symptoms Surface

Blood Test Shows Promise in Spotting Preeclampsia Before Symptoms Surface

An experimental blood test could help detect pregnant women at increased risk for preeclampsia, a serious high blood pressure condition that can harm both mother and child.

Researchers report the test looks at genetic markers found in tiny particles called extracellular vesicles that transfer information between human cells.

Women wi...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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U.S. Stroke Survival Is Improving, But Race Still Plays Role

U.S. Stroke Survival Is Improving, But Race Still Plays Role

There's good news and bad for stroke survival in the United States: New research shows that Americans are now more likely to survive long-term, but that's more true for whites than for Black Americans.

At least for a sample of people living in the greater Cincinnati area, "we saw that there clearly has been an improvement in five-year mort...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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How Early Antibiotic Use Could Raise Kids' Asthma Risk

How Early Antibiotic Use Could Raise Kids' Asthma Risk

Early exposure to antibiotics might increase a kid's risk of asthma by altering their gut bacteria, a new mouse study finds.

Antibiotics could specifically lower gut production of indole propionic acid (IPA), a biochemical that's crucial to long-term protection against asthma, researchers reported July 15 in the journal Immunity.<...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 16, 2024
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