Logo

Get Healthy!

Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

11 Oct

Marital Status and Mortality

Married, divorced or widowed, which group was found to have lower death rates?

10 Oct

Battling Depression With Healthy Foods

Young adults with depression may significantly improve their mood by eating more veggies, fruits and whole grains ... and less fat and sugar.

09 Oct

Sexually Transmitted Diseases On The Rise

Cases Of the 3 Most Common STDs Hit All-Time High in 2018, According To New CDC Report.

What Foods Are Most Likely to Cause Acne Breakouts?

What Foods Are Most Likely to Cause Acne Breakouts?

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Certain eating habits, high levels of stress and exposure to pollution are among the greatest factors associated with acne, researchers say.

They studied links to acne in more than 6,700 people from six countries in Europe and the Americas. The analysis showed that many more people with acne co...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Vision Problems Strike More Than 2 Billion Globally

Vision Problems Strike More Than 2 Billion Globally

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 2 billion people worldwide suffer vision problems that range from impairment to blindness, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO).

And at least 1 billion of those people have problems such as short- and far-sightedness, glaucoma and cataracts -- all of whic...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Using Opioids After Vasectomy May Trigger Persistent Use: Study

Using Opioids After Vasectomy May Trigger Persistent Use: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking opioids after a vasectomy doesn't improve pain control and is associated with increased risk of persistent use of the addictive painkillers months later, a new study says.

It included 228 men who had vasectomies performed by eight different urologists. Two of the urologists routinely pre...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
AHA News: Women and Men Tolerate Heart Transplants Equally Well, But Men May Get Better Hearts

AHA News: Women and Men Tolerate Heart Transplants Equally Well, But Men May Get Better Hearts

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Women are just as likely as men to survive after a heart transplant despite often getting poorer-quality donor hearts, new research shows.

The findings, published this week in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Heart Failure, sought to shed new light on...

How Fast You Walk Might Show How Fast You're Aging

How Fast You Walk Might Show How Fast You're Aging

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged folks who worry about healthy aging would do well to keep an eye on their walking speed.

Turns out that the walking speed of 45-year-olds is a pretty solid marker of how their brains and bodies are aging, a new study suggests.

Slow walkers appear to be aging more rapidly, ...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Is Melanoma Suspected? Get 2nd Opinion From Specialist, Study Says

Is Melanoma Suspected? Get 2nd Opinion From Specialist, Study Says

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma is the most lethal type of skin cancer, and a new study finds that the diagnosis of a suspect lesion gains accuracy when a specialist pathologist is brought on board.

Many patients with melanoma are first diagnosed by general practitioners, dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A biopsy ...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Light Smoking Causes More Lung Damage Than  Once Suspected: Study

Light Smoking Causes More Lung Damage Than Once Suspected: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even light smoking causes long-term damage to lungs, researchers warn.

In a new study, they compared lung function -- how much air a person can breathe in and out -- from more than 25,000 people. The analysis included nonsmokers, light smokers (fewer than five cigarettes a day) and heavy smoker...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Farm-to-Table Movement Goes to School

Farm-to-Table Movement Goes to School

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a healthy new twist in the farm-to-table movement: Getting farm-fresh food to school lunchrooms and even having students grow their own crops as part of learning.

Colorado was a pioneer in passing the "Farm-to-School Healthy Kids Act" in 2010. The move was designed to increase the use o...

The Surprising Benefits of Weight Training

The Surprising Benefits of Weight Training

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The most common misconception about weight training is that it adds bulky muscle mass, a fear of some women. While elite male lifters can -- and want to -- get very developed, for most people the result is simply well-toned muscles.

Other benefits are increased mobility, more support for your ...

Hurricanes Raise Death Risk for Older Diabetics, Even Years Later

Hurricanes Raise Death Risk for Older Diabetics, Even Years Later

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hurricanes can harm anyone in their path, but new research suggests that seniors with diabetes face a 40% increased risk of dying within the first month after a storm hits.

It's not just the first month they have to worry about: The study also found seniors with diabetes still had a 6%...

  • Serena Gordon
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Exercise Might Guard Against Heart Damage of Chemo

Exercise Might Guard Against Heart Damage of Chemo

FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chemotherapy can be hard on the heart, but an individualized exercise program may mitigate some of that damage, new research suggests.

Heart problems are a common side effect in patients with cancer because cancer treatments can impair heart function and structure or accelerate development of ...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 11, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Close to 1,300 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Now Identified

Close to 1,300 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Now Identified

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans sickened with a severe lung injury tied to vaping just keeps rising, U.S. health officials said Thursday.

"As of October 8, 2019, 1,299 confirmed and probable lung injury cases associated with use of e-cigarette, or vaping, products were reported by 49 states, the Dist...

  • Dennis Thompson
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
By Mid-Century, Heat Waves Could Cover Far Bigger Areas

By Mid-Century, Heat Waves Could Cover Far Bigger Areas

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could trigger much bigger heat waves by mid-century, U.S. researchers report.

Previous research has predicted that the number and intensity of heat waves will increase, but this study is the first to examine changes in their potential physical size.

"As the physical s...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Get Vaccinated Before Flu Takes Hold: CDC

Get Vaccinated Before Flu Takes Hold: CDC

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If Australia was any indication, the flu season here will arrive early, so get your flu shot now, U.S. health officials said Thursday.

While the flu that circulated in the Southern Hemisphere in the past six months seemed severe, that was more the result of an early arrival of the season and...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
New Finding Challenges Old Notions About Dyslexia

New Finding Challenges Old Notions About Dyslexia

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The cerebellum does not affect reading ability in people with dyslexia, according to a new study that challenges a controversial theory.

The cerebellum is a brain structure traditionally involved in motor function. Some researchers have suggested in the past that it plays a role in dyslexia-r...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
Before Choosing an IUD for Birth Control, Know the Facts

Before Choosing an IUD for Birth Control, Know the Facts

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that intrauterine devices, or IUDs, are extremely effective forms of birth control, one expert thinks many women don't have all the facts when considering the option.

Ob-gyn Dr. M. Kathleen Borchardt, from Houston Methodist Health System, is hoping to set the record straight ...

More Years of Football, Higher Odds for Brain Disease Later

More Years of Football, Higher Odds for Brain Disease Later

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The more years football players play the game, the higher their odds of developing the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a new study finds.

Adding to the growing evidence of the link between football and CTE, samples from the brains of dead pro and am...

  • Steven Reinberg
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
How Does Early Menopause Affect a Woman's Heart?

How Does Early Menopause Affect a Woman's Heart?

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Menopause before age 50 puts women at increased risk of nonfatal heart conditions, and the earlier menopause occurs, the greater the risk, new research suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 300,000 women who were part of 15 studies around the world, and found that women who reach...

  • Robert Preidt
  • |
  • October 10, 2019
  • |
  • Full Page
New Treatment Offers Hope for Kids With Deadly Nerve Cancer

New Treatment Offers Hope for Kids With Deadly Nerve Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with an immune-boosting therapy might improve the outlook of young children with an advanced form of cancer, a new small study suggests.

The trial involved 43 children with high-risk neuroblastoma, a cancer that starts in immature nerve cells. Researchers found that a new trea...

AHA News: Torn Between Work and Family? It May Not Be Good for Heart Health

AHA News: Torn Between Work and Family? It May Not Be Good for Heart Health

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When family demands affect work performance or work demands undermine family obligations, the resulting stress may contribute to decreased heart health, particularly among women, a new study finds.

The study, published Thursday in the Journal of the American Heart Associa...

HealthDay
Health News is provided as a service to Shelby Drugstore, Inc. site users by HealthDay. Shelby Drugstore, Inc. nor its employees, agents, or contractors, review, control, or take responsibility for the content of these articles. Please seek medical advice directly from your pharmacist or physician.
Copyright © 2019 HealthDay All Rights Reserved.