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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

09 Nov

Is It A Cold, The Flu Or COVID-19?

Experts looked at how you can tell the difference between these three illnesses.

06 Nov

Does Physical Work Help Protect Brain From Dementia?

Physical activity on the job may be very different than leisure-time movement, new study finds.

05 Nov

Getting A Flu Shot May Protect You Against Severe COVID-19

COVID-19 patients who skip the flu shot more than double their risk of being hospitalized, new study finds.

Fauci Warns of Another Surge of COVID Cases After Thanksgiving Travel

Fauci Warns of Another Surge of COVID Cases After Thanksgiving Travel

After millions of Americans chose to travel for Thanksgiving, Dr. Anthony Fauci warned on Sunday that a "surge superimposed upon" a surge of coronavirus cases will likely follow.

As the number of coronavirus-related deaths per day rose to its highest point since April, Fauci and other public health officials stressed the importance of wear...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • November 30, 2020
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Later School Start Time, Fewer Migraines for Teens?

Later School Start Time, Fewer Migraines for Teens?

Later school start times for teenagers might help those who struggle with migraines, a new study suggests.

Starting school later in the morning could reduce the number of migraines each month for these students, the researchers said. The delayed start would be a nod to teens' later-to-bed, later-to-rise body clocks.

"Evidence sugges...

Booze Robbing Many Americans of Their Sleep

Booze Robbing Many Americans of Their Sleep

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans have lost sleep because they drank alcohol too close to bedtime, including 1 in 5 who often have this problem, a new poll shows.

In the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) survey, men were more likely to say they've lost sleep due to drinking alcohol than women (75% vs. 60%), and adults ages 35-44 (78%) are m...

Opioid Deaths in Young Americans Often Involve Other Drugs

Opioid Deaths in Young Americans Often Involve Other Drugs

Opioid overdose deaths involving more than one substance are more common among American teens and young adults than deaths caused by opioids alone, researchers report.

They also found that stimulants such as cocaine and crystal methamphetamine are the non-opioid substances most commonly involved in opioid overdose deaths in young people. ...

Women More Likely to Survive Lung Cancer After Surgery: Study

Women More Likely to Survive Lung Cancer After Surgery: Study

Women have higher survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, according to a new study.

Previous research on sex differences in survival after lung cancer treatment has yielded conflicting results, so researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden decided to study the association between gender and survival after lung cancer surg...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 27, 2020
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Frozen Eggs Help Breast Cancer Survivors Conceive

Frozen Eggs Help Breast Cancer Survivors Conceive

Freezing their eggs or ovarian tissue before breast cancer treatment increases survivors' chances of having children after recovery, a new study finds.

Nearly 10% of breast cancer cases occur in women younger than 45 years of age, some of whom haven't yet had children, according to researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

T...

Preemie Babies End Up Hospitalized More as Kids

Preemie Babies End Up Hospitalized More as Kids

Children born prematurely have a higher risk of hospitalization later on than those born at full term, a new study says.

Health problems are common in premature babies, though the risk falls as they grow up. But researchers said it has been unclear when the risk begins to drop or how it's affected by a child's gestational age at birth.

...

Wood-Fired Cooking a Cause of Lung Illness in Developing World

Wood-Fired Cooking a Cause of Lung Illness in Developing World

THURSDAY, Nov. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) – People who cook with wood instead of other fuels may be at risk of lung damage because of the pollutants and bacterial toxins they're breathing, a small study suggests.

Researchers studied the impact of cookstove pollutants on 23 people in Thanjavur, India, who use liquefied petroleum gas or woo...

Quick Bursts of Exercise Can Help Diabetics' Hearts

Quick Bursts of Exercise Can Help Diabetics' Hearts

Frequent, short exercise sessions may be better for diabetes patients' blood vessels than longer and fewer workouts, and that may reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study.

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease and reduced vascular (blood vessel) function, the study authors noted. Measuring ...

Nurse Practitioners Key to Opioid Treatment in Rural U.S.: Study

Nurse Practitioners Key to Opioid Treatment in Rural U.S.: Study

In isolated areas of the United States, nurse practitioners are filling an important role in helping people access treatment for opioid addiction, according to a Washington State University (WSU) study.

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants have only been authorized to prescribe buprenorphine (a drug that can treat opioid addiction)...

Quit Smoking, Your Bladder Will Thank You

Quit Smoking, Your Bladder Will Thank You

If you smoke, you significantly increase your odds of developing bladder cancer, experts warn.

"Everyone knows smoking causes lung cancer, but they don't always know about bladder cancer," said Dr. Srinivas Vourganti, a urologist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago who specializes in treating bladder and other urinary tract cancer...

Heart Anatomy May Put Blacks at Higher Stroke Risk

Heart Anatomy May Put Blacks at Higher Stroke Risk

Black Americans face a heightened risk of stroke, and a new study suggests that abnormalities in the heart's upper chambers play a role.

Experts said the findings, published Nov. 25 in the journal Neurology, point to an under-recognized factor in Black Americans' stroke risk.

It has long been known that in the United States,...

MS Has Mixed Impact on Patients' Cancer Risk: Study

MS Has Mixed Impact on Patients' Cancer Risk: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- How does having multiple sclerosis (MS) affect a person's odds for cancer? The answer may depend on the type of cancer, new research shows.

The study found that MS patients do have much greater odds of developing bladder cancer compared to people without the illness. But there...

Simple Move May Boost Spinal Fusion Outcomes

Simple Move May Boost Spinal Fusion Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Nov 25, 2020 (HealthDay) -- A new approach that could revolutionize spinal fusion surgery does away with the need to "flip" patients from their back or side onto their stomach midway through the operation -- a switch researchers say dramatically improves outcomes.

The new technique -- dubbed Single Position Lu...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 25, 2020
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Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: Study

Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: Study


Delirium is often the first symptom of COVID-19 to appear in older people, a new study finds.

They may have confusion with an altered level of consciousness, disorientation, inattention and other mental disturbances, but none of the other typical signs of the coronavirus infection, such as fever and coug...

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 25, 2020
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AHA News: Teens' Ultra-Processed Diet Puts Their Hearts at Risk

AHA News: Teens' Ultra-Processed Diet Puts Their Hearts at Risk

If you think the teenagers in your life have been eating a lot of unhealthy food – you're probably right.

U.S. adolescents get about two-thirds of their calories from ultra-processed food, and the more they eat, the worse they score on important measures of heart health, a new study says.

Nutritionists started using the term "ultra...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • November 25, 2020
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AHA News: While Vacationing on an Isolated Island, She Had a Stroke

AHA News: While Vacationing on an Isolated Island, She Had a Stroke

Lawnae Hunter was ecstatic to escape snowy Oregon and her hectic schedule for a 10-day Christmas vacation with her son, daughter-in-law and then-9-year-old granddaughter in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

The foursome savored lounging by the pool, combing the beach for seashells and sampling the seafood in the remote Caribbean nation.

...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • November 25, 2020
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Fauci: 'People Should Feel Confident' New COVID Vaccines Safe, Effective

Fauci: 'People Should Feel Confident' New COVID Vaccines Safe, Effective

The turnaround time -- from the emergence of the new coronavirus to the advent of multiple vaccines to prevent it -- has been nothing short of "breathtaking," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious disease.

Still, many Americans are still uncertain about getting a COVID-19 shot.

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 25, 2020
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  • COVID Vaccine Rollout Could Begin Mid-December, Fauci Says

    COVID Vaccine Rollout Could Begin Mid-December, Fauci Says

    Approved vaccines against the new coronavirus could begin to be distributed to the most at-risk Americans as early as mid-December, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, said Thursday.

    "And as we get into the first quarter of 2021 — January, February, March — more and more people will get vaccinated," he added ...

    • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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    • November 25, 2020
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    Another Study Casts Doubt on 'Convalescent Plasma' as COVID-19 Treatment

    Another Study Casts Doubt on 'Convalescent Plasma' as COVID-19 Treatment

    Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, anecdotal reports suggested that infusing very sick patients with the blood plasma of people who'd survived the disease might help boost outcomes.

    But study findings released Nov. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, along with disappointing results from prior trials, suggest that those initia...

    • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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    • November 25, 2020
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