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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

19 Nov

Cholesterol Lowering Drugs and Memory

Statins are not associated with cognitive decline.

18 Nov

New Evidence Supporting The Safety Of HPV Vaccines

More than 97 percent of adverse reactions to HPV vaccines are nonserious.

15 Nov

New Treatment For Peanut Allergies?

A simple antibody injection may prevent serious reactions in those with severe peanut allergies.

Grandma Isn't So Lonely After All

Grandma Isn't So Lonely After All

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even though older adults may have smaller social networks than younger adults, they have similar numbers of close friends and levels of well-being, a new study finds.

"Stereotypes of aging tend to paint older adults in many cultures as sad and lonely," said study lead author Wandi Bruine de Br...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 19, 2019
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Animal Study Offers Hope for Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries

Animal Study Offers Hope for Treating Traumatic Brain Injuries

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that might one day counter some of the damage of severe brain injury in humans, researchers report that embryonic neurons implanted in brain-injured mice helped resurrect memory and eased seizures.

"The idea to regrow neurons that die off after a brain injury is something that ne...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 19, 2019
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As Disease Outbreaks Tied to 'Anti-Vaxxers' Rise, States Take Action

As Disease Outbreaks Tied to 'Anti-Vaxxers' Rise, States Take Action

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases are on the across rise in the United States, often fueled by "anti-vaxxer" parents reluctant to immunize their kids.

However, states are countering these trends with laws to boost childhood vaccination rates and safeguard children, a new study finds.

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 19, 2019
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They Had Half Their Brains Removed. Here's What Happened After

They Had Half Their Brains Removed. Here's What Happened After

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people think of their brain as an overstuffed attic. Every square-inch is either crammed with information or working overtime to help the body function properly. So is it even conceivable that a person be normal with just half a brain?

Yes, apparently it is, according to a new anal...

New Type of Drug Might Ease Migraines

New Type of Drug Might Ease Migraines

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Migraine sufferers who cannot get relief from existing medications may soon have a novel treatment option, a new trial suggests.

The study, of nearly 1,700 patients, found that a pill called ubrogepant worked better than a placebo pill at halting migraines in progress.

The drug has n...

Umbilical Cord 'Milking' Procedure Dangerous for Preemies: Study

Umbilical Cord 'Milking' Procedure Dangerous for Preemies: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Squeezing the last drops of blood from the umbilical cord has been touted to help preterm babies get more of the nutrients they need, but it may be dangerous, a new study finds.

When umbilical cord blood is forced into the baby's abdomen, the pressure can cause tiny blood vessels in the brai...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • November 19, 2019
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Time to Rethink Ideas About Exercise, Sickle Cell Disease?

Time to Rethink Ideas About Exercise, Sickle Cell Disease?

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mild exercise is safe and beneficial for people with sickle cell disease, contrary to traditional beliefs, a new study finds.

Sickle cell disease affects blood flow in the body. Because strenuous exercise boosts blood flow, it can lead to heart problems and severe pain in someone with sickle c...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 19, 2019
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AHA News: Erectile Dysfunction May Up the Odds for Irregular Heartbeat

AHA News: Erectile Dysfunction May Up the Odds for Irregular Heartbeat

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Men with erectile dysfunction are more likely to be diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat, according to a new study.

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is an irregular or quivering heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke and heart failure. The condition affects up to 6.1 mi...

AHA News: Bacteria in Your Spit Might Play a Role in Heart Disease

AHA News: Bacteria in Your Spit Might Play a Role in Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Bacteria in the saliva of people with clogged arteries appears to be different from that of healthy people, according to a small study. The finding which could open the door for new strategies to fight heart disease.

The preliminary research, presented this week at the Americ...

'Don't Give Up:' Parents' Intuition Spots a Rare Illness Before Doctors Do

'Don't Give Up:' Parents' Intuition Spots a Rare Illness Before Doctors Do

TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents usually know their child better than anyone, and if a parent suspects something is wrong, it probably is.

That was the case for Dan and Laura Wallenberg from Columbus, Ohio. EV Wallenberg was just 5 months old when they noticed that their daughter wasn't eating normally. They schedule...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • November 19, 2019
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Most Parents Struggle to Spot Depression in Teens

Most Parents Struggle to Spot Depression in Teens

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most American parents say they might have trouble distinguishing between a teen's typical mood swings and possible signs of depression, a new survey finds.

The nationwide poll of 819 parents with at least one child in middle school, junior high or high school found that while one-third were co...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 19, 2019
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U.S. Hurricanes Are Bigger, Stronger, More Destructive: Study

U.S. Hurricanes Are Bigger, Stronger, More Destructive: Study

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change has increased the size, strength and destructive force of hurricanes that strike the United States, according to a new Danish study.

It also reported that the most severe hurricanes are more than three times as common as they were 100 years ago.

The conclusions are base...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 18, 2019
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With Blood Draws, Bedside Manners Matter

With Blood Draws, Bedside Manners Matter

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- How much pain you feel when blood samples are taken could depend on how nice the person wielding the needle is, new research suggests.

Patients were 390% more likely to say their pain was well-controlled when the person taking their blood was courteous, according to a study presented recent...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 18, 2019
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Stereotypes About Girls and Math Don't Add Up, Scans Show

Stereotypes About Girls and Math Don't Add Up, Scans Show

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Girls and boys have no differences in brain function or math ability, according to researchers who used imaging to analyze kids' brain development.

The study is the latest to debunk the common myth that women are less suited to work in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fie...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 18, 2019
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Statins Won't Harm Aging Brains, and May Even Help

Statins Won't Harm Aging Brains, and May Even Help

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can impair brain health appear to be unfounded, according to new research.

"Statins won't make you stupid or cause memory loss," said lead researcher Dr. Katherine Samaras, a professor of medicine at St. Vincent's Clinical School of Medicine in ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • November 18, 2019
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Muscle in Middle Age Might Help Men's Hearts Later

Muscle in Middle Age Might Help Men's Hearts Later

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men who maintain their muscle mass may lower their risk of heart disease as they get older, a new study suggests.

Beginning in the mid-30s, muscle begins to decline by about 3% each decade. Previous studies found that muscle mass is associated with heart attack/stroke risk, but ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 18, 2019
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Fish Oil Rx Slows Clogging in Arteries

Fish Oil Rx Slows Clogging in Arteries

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prescription-strength fish oil slows the development of artery-clogging plaques, according to early results from an ongoing clinical trial.

Icosapent ethyl, sold under the brand name Vascepa, is a drug derived from fish that contains pure EPA, a key nutrient in fish oil. In the new study, Vasce...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • November 18, 2019
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AHA News: High Blood Pressure, Unhealthy Diets in Women of Childbearing Age

AHA News: High Blood Pressure, Unhealthy Diets in Women of Childbearing Age

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- One in five women of childbearing age has high blood pressure, according to a new study that found few of these women are on a diet that could help them – and their babies – reduce their risk for health problems.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, in ...

Expert: Herbal Aids Can Cause Harm When Breast Cancer Spread to Skin

Expert: Herbal Aids Can Cause Harm When Breast Cancer Spread to Skin

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Using herbal products to treat breast cancer that's spread to the skin could slow wound healing and interfere with chemotherapy or hormone treatment, an expert warns.

Many patients try herbal products and creams to treat these skin lesions, according to Dr. Maria Joao Cardoso, head breast surge...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 18, 2019
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AHA News: Millions Who Never Smoked Cigarettes Are Using Other Tobacco Products

AHA News: Millions Who Never Smoked Cigarettes Are Using Other Tobacco Products

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Adults who have never smoked traditional cigarettes are being lured into tobacco use by a host of other products, including e-cigarettes, new research shows.

The study found 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. who had never smoked reported trying non-cigarette tobacco products – w...

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