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Results for search "Cancer: Testicular".

Health News Results - 6

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research should reassure dads-to-be who've had testicular cancer that treatment with radiation or chemotherapy doesn't raise the risk of fathering babies with birth defects.

"Our research set out to investigate whether treatment for the most common cancer among young men leads to a higher risk of fathering a child with a birth defect and w...

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- She's cute, and perhaps a medical breakthrough.

Scientists say they have used frozen testicular tissue to achieve the birth of a healthy baby monkey named Grady -- a success they hope to eventually translate to childhood cancer survivors whose treatment has left them infertile.

Infertility is a potential side effect of the chemoth...

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young men diagnosed with testicular cancer often worry that treating the disease may jeopardize their chances of having children, but new research should ease their minds.

In the study, sperm counts rebounded in men who received one course of chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery for early-stage testicular cancer.

It was k...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Testicular cancer occurs most often in young men, and they need to know the signs of the disease, a urologist says.

Testicular cancer is relatively rare -- about 9,000 new cases will be diagnosed this year in the United States -- but it is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males aged 15 to 40.

It's a highly treatable disease, e...

FRIDAY, Aug. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young boys with undescended testes are at increased risk for testicular cancer and infertility in adulthood, new research suggests.

Undescended testes are the most common birth defect in infant boys, affecting one in 100. Corrective surgery is required.

For the new study, researchers examined data on nearly 351,000 boys who were born...

MONDAY, April 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young men who survive testicular cancer may need to worry about more than a return of their disease: A new study suggests they also face greater heart risks down the road.

"The overarching goal of our study is to implement early interventions in order to reduce the risk of heart disease," said researcher Dr. Mohammad Abu Zaid. An assistant pro...

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Wellness Library Results - 1

Is it important to examine my testicles? Routine self-exams have not been shown to improve your chances of detecting and surviving testicular cancer. However, if you have symptoms of testicular cancer such as pain or swelling of the testicles or the scrotum, a testicular exam could save your life. Most cases of testicular cancer are first detected by men themselves, when they notice something unus...

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