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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

12 Aug

Vitamin D Does Not Reduce The Risk Of Depression In Adults, New Study Finds.

Researchers say D3 supplementation does not elevate mood, either

11 Aug

Should Your College Student Return to Campus?

Two experts lend their opinions

10 Aug

Even With PPE, Risk of COVID-19 Still High for Frontline Workers

Minority health care workers are at especially high risk for testing positive.

Many Community Outbreaks of COVID Traced to Restaurants, Bars

Many Community Outbreaks of COVID Traced to Restaurants, Bars

New data shows that many of the community outbreaks of coronavirus that have cropped up in the United States this summer have originated in restaurants and bars.

In Louisiana, roughly a quarter of the state's 2,360 cases since March that were outside of places like nursing homes and prisons had their origins in bars and restaurants,

  • Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
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  • August 12, 2020
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Frequent COVID Tests Key to College Reopening: Experts

Frequent COVID Tests Key to College Reopening: Experts

Regular testing to catch "silent" COVID-19 spread among students will be key to safely reopening colleges this fall, campus infection control experts say.

Extensive modeling suggests that testing college students for COVID every two to three days using a low-cost, less accurate test would be the best strategy for campuses to safely reo...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • August 12, 2020
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Could Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Hasten Cancer in Seniors?

Could Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Hasten Cancer in Seniors?

Taking a daily low-dose aspirin may speed the progression of cancer in the elderly, a new clinical trial shows.

Daily aspirin doubled the risk that a person 70 or older would die from a stage 3 cancer, and increased the death risk associated with stage 4 cancers by nearly a third, according to data from more than 19,000 older people in...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • August 12, 2020
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Narcissists Are Blind to Their Own Mistakes

Narcissists Are Blind to Their Own Mistakes

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't acknowledge them, a new study shows.

When faced with a poor outcome due to their decisions, most people ask, "What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?" But a narcissist says, "No one could have seen this coming," according to Oregon State University (OSU)-...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • August 11, 2020
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COVID-19 Risk Up to 7 Times Higher for Young Vapers

COVID-19 Risk Up to 7 Times Higher for Young Vapers

Young people who use electronic cigarettes face an increased risk of COVID-19 infection, according to a new study.

Teens and young adults who vaped were five times more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19. And young folks who vape and also smoke regular cigarettes have a sevenfold higher risk of getting COVID-19, researchers found. <...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • August 11, 2020
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Strict, Costly Measures Needed to Reopen Schools: Study

Strict, Costly Measures Needed to Reopen Schools: Study

As debate intensifies over reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic, Stanford University experts offer some tips to make the return to classrooms safer.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has highlighted the importance of kids returning to the classrooms.

"Prolonged school closures can exacerbate socioeconomic disparit...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • August 11, 2020
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Put the Brakes on Driving After a Concussion

Put the Brakes on Driving After a Concussion

After a concussion, it may not be safe to drive for a while, a new, small study suggests.

"People who have concussions often have slower reaction times as a result, and do more poorly on tests of thinking skills after their injury than their peers without concussions," said researcher Julianne Schmidt, from the University of Georgia.<...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • August 11, 2020
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At High Doses, Popular Biotin Supplement Could Mask Heart Trouble

At High Doses, Popular Biotin Supplement Could Mask Heart Trouble

A growing number of older people are turning to the vitamin biotin to fortify their aging skin, hair and nails.

But a new study shows how large doses of it can interfere with some vital medical tests.

Biotin, or vitamin B7, is an essential nutrient. And there is no issue with the lower doses found in multivitamins, said study...

As Climate Change Intensifies Storms, Seniors' Health Could Suffer: Study

As Climate Change Intensifies Storms, Seniors' Health Could Suffer: Study

Global warming may ultimately rain on everyone's parade, but new research suggests that major thunderstorms are already wreaking some havoc on the respiratory health of seniors.

That's because atmospheric changes that precede storms increase the risk that older people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could de...

Pot Use While Pregnant Tied to Higher Odds for Autism in Kids

Pot Use While Pregnant Tied to Higher Odds for Autism in Kids

Research has shown that pot use during pregnancy may increase the risk of stillborn birth, preterm birth and low birth weight.

Now, a new study adds another danger: children whose mothers used pot while pregnant could be at greater risk for autism.

And the increased danger wasn't slight: Using data on every birth in Ontario, ...

  • Serena McNiff
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  • August 11, 2020
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AHA News: Black People Get Fewer Heart Valve Replacements, But Inequity Gap Is Narrowing

AHA News: Black People Get Fewer Heart Valve Replacements, But Inequity Gap Is Narrowing

Black people with severely malfunctioning heart valves are less likely than their white peers to receive lifesaving valve replacements, according to a new study.

The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked at the treatment rates by race for aortic valve stenosis, a condition when the valve doesn'...

Bias More Likely in Medical Journals That Accept Reprint Fees: Study

Bias More Likely in Medical Journals That Accept Reprint Fees: Study

There is a longstanding fear in the scientific community that pharmaceutical companies could sway the research published in medical journals by paying them for advertising, but a new study reveals that advertising might not be the problem.

"All the available literature suggests that ad revenue should be the real concern, but that's not...

  • Serena McNiff
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  • August 11, 2020
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Trump May Block Citizens From Re-Entry if COVID Infection Suspected

Trump May Block Citizens From Re-Entry if COVID Infection Suspected

The Trump Administration is weighing a new rule that would temporarily block an American citizen or legal permanent resident from returning to the United States from abroad if authorities believe the person might be infected with the coronavirus.

President Donald Trump has already imposed sweeping rules that ban entry by foreigners int...

  • Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
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  • August 11, 2020
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Hospitals Full, Doctors Treated Her Severe COVID-19 at Home

Hospitals Full, Doctors Treated Her Severe COVID-19 at Home

New York City resident Jeanne Jennings was so sick with COVID-19 she couldn't draw a decent breath.

"Even going from my bed to the bathroom was such a difficult task, I felt like I was going to pass out," Jennings, 46, said.

Jennings wanted to go to the hospital, but this was early May, the height of the Big Apple's COVID-19 ...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • August 11, 2020
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Another COVID Hazard: False Information

Another COVID Hazard: False Information

Be careful that the COVID-19 information you're getting is accurate and not opinion masquerading as the real McCoy, says the American College of Emergency Physicians.

Watch out for bold claims and instant cures touted on social media or by friends. Get health and medical information from experts like the ACEP and the U.S. Centers for ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • August 11, 2020
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Mental Health Woes Spiraled Among College Students Early in Pandemic

Mental Health Woes Spiraled Among College Students Early in Pandemic

Depression, anxiety and inactive lifestyles are all too common among college students, and a new study finds they may have escalated during the initial outbreak of COVID-19.

Using a mix of smartphone data and online surveys from more than 200 students, researchers at Dartmouth College determined that the coronavirus pandemic had an imm...

  • Serena McNiff
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  • August 11, 2020
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Telemedicine Is Here: Experts Offer Tips for Seniors

Telemedicine Is Here: Experts Offer Tips for Seniors

Virtual medical visits have been invaluable for many during the COVID-19 pandemic, but older adults may still need help managing them -- especially if they are hard of hearing.

That's according to doctors at Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore. Writing in the Aug. 11 Annals of Internal Medicine, they offer some practical advi...

Many Deaths Labeled 'Cardiac Arrest' Could Be Drug ODs: Study

Many Deaths Labeled 'Cardiac Arrest' Could Be Drug ODs: Study

Americans have long known that there's an epidemic of opioid abuse and deaths in the United States. But a new report suggests the true extent of these tragedies has been underestimated.

The study, from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, finds that 1 in every 6 deaths attributed to sudden cardiac arrest among Sa...

Can Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?

Can Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?

As researchers hone in on ways to detect whether someone has a high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before they have any symptoms, mental health professionals have worried what the psychological fallout of that knowledge might be.

But new research suggests that people can handle the truth.

In the study, seniors who d...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • August 10, 2020
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COVID-19 Fears Stop Americans From Seeking Help for Heart Emergencies

COVID-19 Fears Stop Americans From Seeking Help for Heart Emergencies

Black and Hispanic Americans are much more likely than white people to avoid going to the hospital for heart attack or stroke symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic, an online survey reveals.

More than half (55%) of Hispanics, 45% of Black people and 40% of white people said they'd be scared to go to the hospital if they tho...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • August 10, 2020
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