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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

19 Oct

COVID-19 Linked to Increased Risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a Rare but Serious Autoimmune Disorder, New Study Finds

In a new study, participants recently infected with COVID-19 were six times more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves.

18 Oct

Adult ADHD Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

A new study finds adults with ADHD are nearly 3 times more likely to develop dementia compared to those without the condition.

Wendy Williams Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

Wendy Williams Diagnosed With Frontotemporal Dementia

Former talk show host Wendy Williams has been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia, her representatives announced in a statement on Thursday.

The conditions are the same diagnoses actor Bruce Willis received in 2022; his aphasia later progressed to frontotemporal dementia.

Williams' team said the ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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U.S. Safety Protocols Stopped TB in Imported Lab Monkeys From Spreading to Humans

U.S. Safety Protocols Stopped TB in Imported Lab Monkeys From Spreading to Humans

Rigorous safety protocols prevented an outbreak of tuberculosis last year in lab monkeys imported to the United States from spreading to humans, a new report shows.

Overall, 26 cynomolgus macaque monkeys flown in from Southeast Asia to the United States for research purposes were confirmed to be infected with the Mycobacterium orygis <...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Protecting Yourself From Winter Weather Injuries

Protecting Yourself From Winter Weather Injuries

Falls, frostbite, fractures: They are all potential hazards of icy winter conditions. But experts say there's a lot you can do to avoid injury when snowflakes fall.

First, stay warm.

According to the New York City Department of Health, people lose the bulk of their body heat through their heads, so scarves, hats and ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Don't Use Smartwatches That Claim to Measure Blood Sugar, FDA Warns

Don't Use Smartwatches That Claim to Measure Blood Sugar, FDA Warns

Some Americans living with diabetes are using smartwatches and smart rings that claim to be able to track their blood sugar.

However, such claims from any device that does not pierce the skin are fraudulent and potentially dangerous, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned in an advisory issued Wednesday.

Don't be fooled, the ...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Jill Biden Announces $100 Million for Research on Women's Health

Jill Biden Announces $100 Million for Research on Women's Health

First Lady Jill Biden on Wednesday announced $100 million in federal funding to fuel research into women's health.

“We will build a health care system that puts women and their lived experiences at its center,” Biden said in a White House news release announcing the initiative. “Where no woman or girl has to hear that ‘it’s all i...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Want to Boost Your Preschoolers' Language Skills? Reminisce With Them

Want to Boost Your Preschoolers' Language Skills? Reminisce With Them

Talking about the “good old days” might elicit eye rolls from teenagers, but it could be the key to boosting a preschooler’s language skills, a new study finds.

Reminiscing about past events with preschoolers presents young kids with high-quality speech as good as or better than sharing a book or playing with toys, researchers discov...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Families of Infertile Men Face Higher Cancer Risks

Families of Infertile Men Face Higher Cancer Risks

A deficiency or absence of viable sperm in a man's semen could spell danger for him and those closely related to him, new research suggests.

Cancers are more likely to occur in these men and their families, reports a team led by Dr. Joemy Ramsay, an assistant professor at Utah University in Salt Lake City.

The exact link between canc...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Dirty Air Could Be Raising Your Alzheimer's Risk

Dirty Air Could Be Raising Your Alzheimer's Risk

People exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution are more likely to have more amyloid plaques in their brain, a condition associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a new study finds.

Seniors were nearly twice as likely to have more amyloid plaques if, in the year before their death, they lived in places with high concentrations ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Nearly 4 in 10 Americans Know Someone Who's Died From Drug Overdose

Nearly 4 in 10 Americans Know Someone Who's Died From Drug Overdose

More than two in every five Americans know someone who’s died from a drug overdose, a new study shows.

The study highlights the heavy toll that the U.S. opioid epidemic has taken on the nation, researchers say.

“The experiences and needs of millions of survivors of an overdose loss largely have been overlooked in the clinical and...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Long Hours Watching Videos May Stunt Toddlers' Language Development

Long Hours Watching Videos May Stunt Toddlers' Language Development

Television has been wryly referred to as the “electronic babysitter,” but a new study argues TV or other media could stunt a child’s language development.

Children plopped in front of videos for hours on end tend to use phrases and sentences with fewer words, researchers reported recently in the journal Acta Paediatrica.

...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Could Hair Loss Drug Finasteride Help Men's Hearts?

Could Hair Loss Drug Finasteride Help Men's Hearts?

The common hair-loss drug in Propecia and Proscar might lower men’s risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels, a new study suggests.

Finasteride is used to treat male pattern baldness, and it’s also been shown effective in treating an enlarged prostate, researchers said in background notes.

But men who use finasteride ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Scientists May Have Spotted a Key to Long COVID

Scientists May Have Spotted a Key to Long COVID

Infection with the COVID-19 virus triggers the production of an immune system protein that's long been associated with fatigue, muscle ache and depression.

Trouble is, for folks suffering from Long COVID this protein overproduction does not stop, researchers at the University of Cambridge report.

“We have found a potential mechanis...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Recognize the Signs of Burnout in Yourself and Others

Recognize the Signs of Burnout in Yourself and Others

Burnout: It's a common enough concept, but how do you know if you're experiencing it at work and at home?

According to experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, a myriad of daily pressures placed on individuals can culminate in burnout.

“Burnout is not a result of one singular thing,” explained Dr. Eric Storch, vice chai...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 22, 2024
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Move to Electric Vehicles Could Prevent Millions of Child Asthma Attacks Each Year

Move to Electric Vehicles Could Prevent Millions of Child Asthma Attacks Each Year

If all cars and trucks sold in America were "zero emission" by 2040 and the country's electric grid was also powered by clean energy, nearly 2.8 million child asthma attacks would be prevented annually, a new report finds.

The American Lung Association (ALA) report also estimates that with cleaner air, 508 infant lives would also be save...

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

Unexpected medical bills and high health care costs are dominating an election where kitchen table economic problems weigh heavily on voter's minds, a new KFF poll has found.

Voters struggling to pay their monthly bills are most eager to hear presidential candidates talk about economic and health care issues, according to the latest KFF He...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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WHO Reports 79% Increase in Measles Cases Worldwide

WHO Reports 79% Increase in Measles Cases Worldwide

Measles cases around the globe have climbed 79%, with over 300,000 cases reported last year, World Health Organization officials said Tuesday.

The U.N. health agency said it did not yet have a tally for measles deaths in 2023, but it expects that number will also rise.

"In 2022, the number of deaths increased by 43%, according to our...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Alabama Supreme Court Rules Frozen Embryos Are Children

Alabama Supreme Court Rules Frozen Embryos Are Children

In a ruling that could drastically limit future infertility care, the Alabama Supreme Court has ruled that frozen embryos can be considered children under state law.

In the decision, judges turned to what it called anti-abortion language in that state's constitution and concluded that an 1872 state law that allows parents to sue over the d...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Mercury Levels in Tuna Haven't Budged Since 1971

Mercury Levels in Tuna Haven't Budged Since 1971

Mercury levels in tuna haven't changed since 1971, despite efforts to reduce emissions of the toxic metal into the environment, researchers report.

Their analysis of nearly 3,000 tuna samples caught in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans between 1971 and 2022 revealed stable mercury concentrations in tuna during those five decades.

...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Menthols Ban Would Slash U.S. Smoking Rates: Study

Menthols Ban Would Slash U.S. Smoking Rates: Study

A ban on menthol cigarettes would likely lead to a meaningful reduction in smoking rates, a new review argues.

Almost a quarter of menthol smokers quit smoking altogether after menthol cigarettes were banned in their country or community, researchers report Feb. 21 in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

“This revi...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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Cutting Out Meat Might Help Prevent Snoring: Study

Cutting Out Meat Might Help Prevent Snoring: Study

A person’s diet can influence their risk of obstructive sleep apnea, a new study says.

Those who eat a healthy plant-based diet rich in vegetables, fruit, whole grains and nuts are less likely to suffer sleep apnea, according to findings published Feb. 20 in the journal ERJ Open Research.

On the other hand, people who eat ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 21, 2024
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