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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

26 Feb

Very Low COVID-19 Rate Among Dental Hygienists

COVID-19 diagnoses among dental hygienists far below that of other health professionals, researchers say

25 Feb

Irregular Sleep Patterns Tied To Bad Moods and Depression

Variable wake-up and sleep times can increase a person's risk of depression symptoms over time, researchers say.

24 Feb

Heart Health and Brain Power Linked in Preschoolers

4-to-6-year-old children with higher heart-lung fitness perform better on intellectual tests, researchers say

Working from Home? Here's How to Preserve Your Posture

Working from Home? Here's How to Preserve Your Posture

If you're working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, you need to have a work space that's doesn't cause pain or discomfort in your back, neck or legs, a spine specialist says.

"Most couches may not provide the same type of support and contour as an ergonomic office chair, so your back and neck may stay in a fixed, stressed position for ...

FDA Approves Third COVID Vaccine

FDA Approves Third COVID Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Saturday approved Johnson & Johnson's single-shot coronavirus vaccine for emergency use after its advisory panel unanimously backed the vaccine a day earlier.

Adding a third vaccine to the country's arsenal will help boost the nation's limited supply of the two authorized shots, from Pfizer and Mode...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • February 28, 2021
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FDA Set to Approve Third COVID Vaccine

FDA Set to Approve Third COVID Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it will move quickly to approve Johnson & Johnson's single-shot coronavirus vaccine for emergency use after its advisory panel unanimously backed the vaccine earlier in the day.

In a statement, the agency said it has notified the company and federal officials involved in vaccine d...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • February 27, 2021
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Spring Allergies Are Near, Here's What Works to Fight Them

Spring Allergies Are Near, Here's What Works to Fight Them

For millions of Americans, sneezing, coughing, runny noses, itchy eyes and congestion are sure signs that spring is on the way.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) has advice for coping with these classic hay fever symptoms. It recently published a guideline for health care providers caring for patients with thes...

Education Level Now Prime Driver of COVID Vaccine Hesitancy: Poll

Education Level Now Prime Driver of COVID Vaccine Hesitancy: Poll

In the early weeks of the U.S. vaccine rollout, race looked like it would determine who was willing to get a shot in the arm, but education level now plays the most powerful role in that decision, new research shows.

More than three-quarters of adults with at least a bachelor's degree have been vaccinated or plan to be, compared to 53% of ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 26, 2021
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Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Help Fight Severe COVID-19

Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Help Fight Severe COVID-19

Rheumatoid arthritis drugs may save lives of patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19, according to a groundbreaking clinical trial.

The findings, first announced in January, have now been peer-reviewed and published in a major medical journal.

"We are delighted that our full results are now published after peer review. T...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 26, 2021
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AHA News: From Mild COVID-19 to Heart Failure in 4 Weeks – at Age 20

AHA News: From Mild COVID-19 to Heart Failure in 4 Weeks – at Age 20

Madeline Neville tried her best to avoid catching COVID-19 while attending Temple University in Philadelphia.

In late October, she was visiting her parents near Scranton, Pennsylvania, when she learned one of her roommates had been exposed to the virus.

Madeline panicked, realizing that if the coronavirus had been passed along to her...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • February 26, 2021
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Mental Health 'Epidemic' Threatens Communities of Color Amid COVID-19

Mental Health 'Epidemic' Threatens Communities of Color Amid COVID-19

Communities of color face a burgeoning wave of mental health problems as a result of how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people interact and grieve, experts warn.

"We're about to have a mental health epidemic because of COVID," Vickie Mays, a professor of health policy and director of the UCLA Center on Research, Education, Train...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2021
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In Israel, Widespread Vaccination Slashes Severe COVID Cases in Older Patients

In Israel, Widespread Vaccination Slashes Severe COVID Cases in Older Patients

FRIDAY, March 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Israel is among the first nations in the world to have a majority of its citizens vaccinated against the new coronavirus. That effort may be already paying off, with rates of severe COVID-19 cases declining by two-thirds among Israelis over the age of 69, a new report finds.

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  • Ernie Mundell
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  • February 26, 2021
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Expert Panel Set to Consider Approval of J&J COVID Vaccine

Expert Panel Set to Consider Approval of J&J COVID Vaccine

An advisory panel for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will spend Friday weighing whether a coronavirus vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson should be approved for emergency use.

The expert panel is expected to endorse the vaccine, meaning that the United States could have a third vaccine at its disposal as early as Saturday, Th...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • February 26, 2021
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Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

Pandemic Is Hitting Hospitals Hard, Including Their Bottom Line

U.S. hospitals are expected to lose billions again in 2021, leaving them in dire financial shape as the COVID-19 pandemic guts the industry for a second year.

Hospitals could lose $53 billion to $122 billion in revenue in 2021, between 4% and 10% of their total revenue, according to an analysis prepared by consulting firm Kaufman Hall & As...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2021
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Common Antidepressants Won't Raise Risk for Bleeding Strokes: Study

Common Antidepressants Won't Raise Risk for Bleeding Strokes: Study

The most widely prescribed antidepressants in the United States don't appear to increase the risk of the deadliest type of stroke, according to a new preliminary study.

It examined the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and intracerebral hemorrhage. This is when a brain blood vessel bursts and blood spreads...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 26, 2021
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Hair Salon Talk Can Spread COVID, But Face Shields Cut the Danger

Hair Salon Talk Can Spread COVID, But Face Shields Cut the Danger

Just having a chat in a hair salon can spread the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, a new study finds.

The same is likely true in many health care settings, the same research showed.

Most research on exhaled air and the spread of the virus has focused on coughing or sneezing, which can spread small respiratory droplets across long ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 26, 2021
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As Climate Change Lengthens Allergy Season, Pollen Travels Farther

As Climate Change Lengthens Allergy Season, Pollen Travels Farther

If you suffer the itchy, sneezy, wheezy consequences of seasonal allergies, you're probably painfully aware that pollen season is starting earlier and lasting longer than ever.

It's an upshot of climate change, and new research from Germany offers an explanation for this extended sneezin' season: Pollen is on the move, with early blooming ...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 25, 2021
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Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

If you think you can safely exercise without your mask in a gym during the pandemic, two new government reports show you are mistaken.

Coronavirus outbreaks at fitness centers in Chicago and Honolulu last summer were likely the result of exercisers and instructors not wearing masks, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 25, 2021
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Alzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different Ways

Alzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different Ways

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The ravages of Alzheimer's may strike later in women than men, but once it takes hold women tend to deteriorate far faster than men, according to a new study.

Something known as cognitive reserve helps the aging brain function better for longer, and researchers report that wome...

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 25, 2021
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Mediterranean Diet Could Keep Aging Brains Sharp

Mediterranean Diet Could Keep Aging Brains Sharp

THURSDAY, Feb. 25, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Helping your brain stay sharp with age may be as simple as changing up the food on your plate at dinnertime, a new study suggests.

The study focused on the healthy "Mediterranean" diet, a regimen reliant on olive oil, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, with chick...

  • Colin Tweedy HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 25, 2021
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Why Is Liver Cancer More Lethal for Black Patients?

Why Is Liver Cancer More Lethal for Black Patients?

THURSDAY, Feb 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Black people with hepatitis C develop liver cancer sooner than people in other racial groups and the cancer is often more aggressive, but current screening guidelines may not be broad enough to catch these cases early, according to a new study.

Why? Despite often being more adva...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 25, 2021
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AHA News: Why Experts Say a Good Mood Can Lead to Good Health

AHA News: Why Experts Say a Good Mood Can Lead to Good Health

It doesn't take a scientist to understand that laughter feels good, while anger feels awful.

But it does take one to explain why one of these feelings can boost the immune system, while the other can wear it down, damage the heart and increase the risk for dementia.

Simply put: "Mood can influence your health," said Dr. Erin Michos, ...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • February 25, 2021
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COVID Cases, Deaths Plummet in Nursing Homes After Vaccine Rollout

COVID Cases, Deaths Plummet in Nursing Homes After Vaccine Rollout

In a hopeful turnaround during a long pandemic, U.S. nursing homes that were once the epicenter of coronavirus infections are now seeing both cases and deaths fall steeply as the country's vaccination rollout starts to take hold.

From late December to early February, new cases among U.S. nursing home residents fell by more than 80 per...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • February 25, 2021
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