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25 Oct

The Weather and Your Heart

Certain weather conditions may increase the risk of heart attack.

Health News Results - 95

August Is Deadliest Month for Young Football Players

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It is an annual rite of summer: sending young men out on football fields across America in the sweltering August heat for grueling practice sessions designed to prepare them for the coming season.

But a new study shows the ritual can be costly if players are pushed too hard. It is the most common way players die of non-traumatic injuries in hi...

Heat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney Patients

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers yet another population that will be vulnerable to the heat waves that climate change is delivering with increasing frequency: people with kidney disease.

Extremely hot days can increase advanced kidney disease patients' risk of hospitalization and death, and climate change means they'll face more such days, the study aut...

Climate Change Could Raise Mercury Levels in Some Fish

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study adds to the list of potential health threats from global warming: Higher mercury levels in certain fish.

While eating fish is considered part of a healthy diet, it's also a source of mercury -- which, in high enough amounts, is toxic to the nervous system and kidneys.

Small fish generally have only small amounts of merc...

In Heat Waves, Fans May Do More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of picking up an electric fan to help keep you cool and protect your health during the next heat wave?

You might want to think again.

Electric fans might make you feel cooler, but they can actually increase your risk of becoming heat sick and even dying from a heat stroke, the evidence shows.

Electric fans could co...

AHA News: Hurricane Checklist: Batteries, Bottled Water – And A Plan for Heart Care

FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- With hurricane season in full swing, the constant counsel along the nation's coastlines is to be prepared.

But that means more than filling disaster kits with non-perishable food or planning out evacuation routes. Doctors who have helped in hurricanes say people also must plan to stay healthy before the storm – and in it...

Could Climate Change Help Spread Dangerous Fungal Infection?

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scary new life-threatening fungal infections could soon menace mankind, thanks to climate change, a new report argues.

In general, humans are incredibly resistant to fungal infections because these organisms don't thrive in warmth, said lead author Dr. Arturo Casadevall, chair of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bl...

AHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer Heat

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- The higher the red line creeps up the thermometer gauge, the more red flags for outdoor exercise.

Summer temperatures shouldn't stop you from jogging, hiking or playing sports outside – but they should alert you to the danger of heat illnesses brought on by exertion.

"Think of the heat like you think of a ...

As Heat Bakes the Nation, Expert Offers Tips to Stay Safe

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The heat is on.

Across two-thirds of the United States, over 115 million Americans live where some level of heat alert is already in effect, and 290 million will see temperatures soar past 90 degrees at some point in the next week, USA Today reported Wednesday.

As a dome of high pressure settles over much of the eastern and ...

Hurricanes Can Hurt Survival Odds Among Those With Cancer

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a hurricane strikes, as tropical storm Barry did this weekend in Louisiana, most people worry about the immediate health dangers such a storm poses.

But new research suggests that the interruptions in radiation therapy caused by power outages may also lower the chances of long-term survival among lung cancer patients.

"While w...

Fatal Opioid ODs Rise as Temperatures Fall

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Why do opioid overdose deaths spike after cold snaps?

That's the mystery Brown University researchers set out to solve in a study of more than 3,000 opioid-related deaths in Connecticut and Rhode Island between 2014 and 2017.

The new analysis uncovered a 25% increase in opioid overdose deaths within three to seven days of free...

Keeping the Lid on Global Warming Could Save American Lives

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis suggests the Trump administration should have considered how unchecked climate change might harm U.S. citizens before it pulled out of a pact aimed at slowing down the pace of global warming.

In the study, researchers calculated that tens of thousands of lives in major U.S. cities would be saved annually if rising temperatures...

Say Cheers to Lighter Summer Drinks

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Want to celebrate longer days and warmer nights with fewer calories? Try these smart ways to cut the calories from favorite cocktails.

If you're a daiquiri diehard, skip the packaged mixers and sugary concentrates. Make your own daiquiri base with naturally sweet-tasting berries. To 1 cup of ice, add 1 cup of any berries, cherries or combinatio...

Fewer Deaths Tied to Dirty Air, But Threats Persist: Report

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Significant but uneven improvements in air quality have greatly reduced U.S. deaths related to air pollution over the past decade, a new study shows.

But researchers are concerned that climate change and regulatory rollbacks under the Trump administration will wipe out those advances and put thousands more lives at risk from bad air every ye...

Drier Winter Air May Propel Flu's Spread

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ever wonder why the flu rarely strikes in the summer?

New research offers an explanation: That dry air your heating system sends throughout your home in the winter weakens your immune system, making you a prime target for viral infection.

Cold temperatures and low humidity were known to increase transmission of flu viruses, but ex...

Summer Is Tough for Asthma Sufferers

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime can bring asthma sufferers a lot of misery, but lung experts say watching for warning signs of breathing trouble can guard against serious complications.

"As the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health, we think it's crucial for people with asthma to know as much as they can about the disease," said Dr. D...

U.S. Improves Emergency Readiness, but Gaps Persist

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The United States' ability to deal with major health emergencies quickly has improved significantly in recent years, researchers say.

In 2019, America scored 6.7 on the 10-point National Health Security Preparedness Index. That's a 3.1% improvement over the last year, and up 11.7% since the index was created in 2013.

The fin...

Climate Change Could Worsen Sneezin' Season

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Have you started feeling like your allergies are acting up earlier every year, or maybe they're lasting longer?

New research suggests it's not just your imagination -- climate change appears to be disrupting nature's usual calendar.

Areas with an earlier spring had a 14% higher rate of seasonal allergies (hay fever), the re...

Major Flooding Can Bring Skin Infection Dangers

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Flooding from hurricanes and other natural disasters increases the risk of skin infections among victims and relief workers, a skin expert warns.

"In 2017, we experienced almost as many flooding events as we did throughout the previous 10 years," said Dr. Justin Bandino. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at San Antonio Military Medica...

Blood Donors Needed as Cold Weather Freezes U.S. Supply

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. blood supply is expected to drop to dangerously low levels as sub-zero weather in many parts of the country forces cancellation of crucial blood drives, American Red Cross officials warn.

Severe winter weather has already led to 370 cancellations across the country, resulting in the loss of 11,600 anticipated blood donations, the ag...

AHA: Chilling Studies Show Cold Weather Could Raise Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- Overexertion with a snow shovel isn't the only cardiovascular risk during the winter.

When temperatures go down, the incidence of stroke -- the country's fifth-leading cause of death -- appears to go up.

"There have been a number of studies that have confirmed this in different parts of the world," said Dr. Daniel Lac...

Polar Vortex Brings Frostbite Danger: Protect Yourself

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Minus 29 Fahrenheit in Fargo, minus 28 in Minneapolis, minus 13 in Des Moines.

With potential record-setting low temperatures ahead for much of the nation, one expert warns that frostbite can quickly strike exposed skin.

"With wind chills approaching the single digits and below zero, it is possible to develop 'frostnip' with progr...

Plunging Temperatures a Threat to People With Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The polar vortex that has enveloped much of the United States this week poses a special danger to people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

"This type of weather can be hazardous for everyone, but even more so for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease, who may have difficulty noticing temperature and weather changes...

Layer Up During the Polar Vortex

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare to venture outside.

The swath of the cold freeze is so wide and deep that roughly 75 percent of Americans living on the U.S. mainland...

Climate Change Already Hurting Human Health, Review Shows

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said ...

Simple Treatments to Banish Winter Blues

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The gray days of winter bring many people down, but a few simple steps can pep you up, an expert says.

A condition known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can cause feelings of sadness or depression, lack of energy, problems sleeping, moodiness, changes in appetite and loss of interest in usual activities.

"It is most common amo...

Climate Change Ups Heat Deaths, Especially Among Elderly: Report

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of heat-related disease and death is rising worldwide due to climate change, a new report warns.

Hotter temperatures threaten the elderly and other vulnerable people with heat stress, and heart and kidney disease, according to an international team of experts.

Last year, more than 157 million at-risk people were exposed to ...

Warmer Winters, More Violent Crimes?

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Milder winters caused by climate change may lead to an increase in violent crime in the United States, researchers say.

"During mild winters, more people are out and about, creating the key ingredient for interpersonal crimes: opportunity," explained study author Ryan Harp, from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

The findings ar...

AHA: Warm, Wet Weather Linked to Better Outcomes for Stroke Survivors

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Rainy days may bring a lot more than relief from summer heat -- they also are connected to better survival chances and overall outlook for stroke survivors, according to a new study.

Researchers examining the connection between strokes and seasonal weather in the United States found that hospital admissions for ischemic strokes, ...

Climate Change Could Change the Ragweed Sneezin' Season

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you live in Maine and you've never experienced hay fever, new research predicts that climate change has an unwelcome surprise in store for you.

Warmer temperatures in the northern United States will allow ragweed -- the plant that triggers hay fever -- to flourish in areas it's never been before. About 35 years from now, the study predict...

Cold, Windy Days Can Strain the Heart

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Brisk autumn winds and chilly winter temperatures may make you more vulnerable to heart trouble, a new study suggests.

Researchers found "an increase in heart attacks in low temperature, strong wind, low sunshine duration and low atmospheric pressure," said senior author Dr. David Erlinge, head of cardiology at Lund University in Sweden.

Warmer Weather Gets Seniors Outdoors and Moving

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The better the weather, the more seniors venture out and get active.

So say researchers who assessed the activity levels of more than 1,200 adults in Norway, aged 70 to 77, who were grouped based on whether they scored low, medium or high on a fitness test.

"Older people in poor physical condition become less physically active if th...

Michael's Lingering Threat: Mold

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the flooding and devastation left by Hurricane Michael, Americans faced with the clean-up are facing a new health threat: mold.

Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in the path of the storm, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

"Where there's dampness and water, ther...

As Hurricane Michael Hits Florida, Experts Urge Safety

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As category 4 Hurricane Michael slammed into northern Florida on Wednesday, the National Safety Council offered residents steps to stay safe.

First, the council urges those in the storm's path to monitor its progress and heed government warnings.

It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need during any severe weathe...

As Hurricane Michael Nears, Expert Warns of Gas-Powered Generator Dangers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hurricane Michael, now a powerful category 4 storm, is expected to make landfall in northern Florida Wednesday.

And as with every such storm, power outages will occur, along with the risk of deadly carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from gas-powered generators.

"Unfortunately, poison control centers continue to see surges in generato...

AHA: Stroke Care Gains in Puerto Rico Falter After Hurricane Maria

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A project aimed at improving the inequalities in stroke care between Puerto Rico and the mainland did just that -- until Hurricane Maria roared ashore last September and further hobbled the territory's already inadequate health care system, experts say.

Researchers at the University of Miami started the Florida-Puerto Rico Collab...

Florence's Lingering Threat: Mold

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, residents of the Carolinas are facing a new health threat: mold.

Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in North and South Carolina, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

"Where there's dampness and water, there's mold," said Paul...

After Florence Comes the Cleanup: Stay Safe

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- True to its storm-of-the-century hype, Hurricane Florence pounded the Carolinas with historic rainfall and catastrophic flooding -- and continuing danger looms in its wake.

Infection and injury are the big threats as cleanup begins, and experts say it's important to be smart as you tackle the dirty work.

"The 'it's-not-going-to-happ...

Flooding One of Florence's Big Dangers

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As Florence unleashes her full fury on the Carolinas, residents who stayed put need to know that flooding will be even more dangerous than the high winds of this hurricane.

Making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., around 7 a.m. Friday, the category 1 hurricane was pounding the historic town of New Bern, which sits just to the north of...

As Earth Warms, Heat-Related Deaths Will Multiply

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could become very deadly, as heat-related deaths rise with increases in global temperatures, a new report shows.

"Currently, we are on a trajectory to reach over 3 degrees Celsius of warming, and if this trend continues there would be serious consequences for health in many parts of the world," said study co-author Antonio Ga...

Beware a Bolt From the Blue

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- They say lightning never strikes twice, but once is enough for the 47 people it kills in the United States each year.

The National Weather Center calls lightning "an underrated killer, hotter than the surface of the sun."

According to University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers, Nebraska alone sees an average of 773,000 lig...

As Hurricane Florence Targets U.S., Experts Urge Safety

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With Hurricane Florence barreling toward the Carolinas, the National Safety Council offers steps to stay safe.

As mass evacuations begin in coastal North Carolina, and states of emergency are declared in Virginia and North and South Carolina, the council urges those along the East Coast to monitor the storm's path and heed government warnin...

More Rattlesnake Bites After Rainy Spells

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The threat of rattlesnake bites in California decreases during droughts and increases after rainy weather, a new study finds.

Rainy spells result in more shrub growth and, with that, more rodents, the snakes' primary food source, said study author Dr. Grant Lipman, an emergency medicine physician at Stanford Medicine, and colleagues.

...

Severity of Alzheimer's Can Vary by Season

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The thinking ability of people with Alzheimer's disease changes depending on the season, researchers report.

These patients are better in the late summer and early fall than in the winter and spring, according to the analysis of data on nearly 3,400 Alzheimer's patients in the United States, Canada and France.

"There may be value in...

Forecast Sees Abnormal Heat Worldwide Through 2022

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- This year's record-breaking worldwide heat wave is likely a preview of coming attractions, scientists say.

Using a new method for predicting global temperatures, researchers concluded that 2018-2022 may be even hotter than expected.

While global warming appeared to have eased early in the 21st century, the new forecasting method ...

AHA: With Hurricane Season Underway, Health Experts Urge More Support for the Vulnerable

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- When Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last fall, José Maldonado was heartbroken. Although he now lives in Maryland, he has strong ties to the island where he was born. But when his sisters tried to convince him to help with disaster relief, he was skeptical.

"In the beginning, I told them they were crazy to have me do...

Study Forecasts Dramatic Floods in Western U.S. Due to Climate Change

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could more than double the risk of rain-on-snow flooding in parts of the western United States and Canada by the end of the century, researchers report.

The risk is highest in the Sierra Nevada, the Colorado River headwaters and the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Rain-on-snow events can cause damaging flooding as rapid snowmelt trigge...

Climate Change Means More Deadly Heat Waves: Study

TUESDAY, July 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As the northern hemisphere is struck by one deadly heat wave after another this summer, new research suggests things are only going to get worse.

Climate change is triggering record high temperatures. And extreme heat has been blamed for hundreds of deaths, while dangerous wildfires have raced through neighborhoods in the western United State...

Summers Less Smoggy Now, But Winter Air Hasn't Improved

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Air quality improvements in the United States have been significant but largely limited to summer. Now, researchers say they know why.

For decades, summer air was the worst of the year, replete with haze-containing particles that cause asthma, lung cancer and other illnesses.

But overall lower levels of emissions from power plants an...

It's Hot Outside: How to Stay Safe When Thermometers Rise

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As much of the United States continues to swelter through 90-plus temperatures and high humidity, one emergency physician is offering advice on keeping safe.

First, Dr. Robert Glatter said, it's important to know that anyone can be a victim of heat stroke, but some people are at particular risk.

"Heat stroke develops when the body is...

AHA: Protect Your Heart and Health During 'Dog Days' of Summer

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Summer is a time for barbecues and other outdoor fun, but it's also a time for sweltering heat. And experts say everyone, especially the elderly and very young, need to know how to limit the potentially deadly effects of high temperatures.

The ancient Greeks and Romans called the sultriest days of summer the "dog days." The Old F...

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