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Study Links Muscle Mass to Severity of Hot Flashes in Women

Older women with muscle loss are less likely to have menopause-related hot flashes, a new study finds.

The loss of muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) is one of the most significant changes that occurs with age, and older women are at increased risk due to sex hormone changes after menopause.

Other risk factors for sarcopenia include inactivity, lower protein intake, changes in g...

Women Feel More Stigma From 'Spare Tire' Around Middle Than Men

Belly fat. No one wants it, but women are much harder on themselves about extra pounds wrapped around their middle than men are, regardless of how much they weigh.

And the more they beat themselves up about their "spare tire," the more likely women are to gain weight in this high-risk area, new research suggests. Visceral (belly) fat wraps around the organs in the abdomen, and is thought ...

Table Set for One May Be Tough on Women's Hearts

Eating alone may be a recipe for heart trouble if you're an older woman, Korean researchers suggest.

Those who eat by themselves are likely to eat faster and less healthily, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood pressure and cholesterol levels, increasing the risk for heart disease, the new study found.

"Women who live alone, who aren't cooking for a family or their husband, t...

Women Less Likely to Ask for More Time When Deadlines Loom

It's a case of being your own worst enemy: New research shows that women are more reluctant to ask for deadline extensions at work than their male colleagues are, in part because they worry about being seen as incompetent.

In a series of studies, researchers found that overall, women were less likely than men to ask for extra time to complete a work or school task. And that reluctance see...

When Climbing Corporate Ladder, Women Are as Competitive as Men: Study

Women are as competitive and as willing to take risks as men when it comes to advancing in the workplace, according to a new study on the gender pay gap in the United States.

"If we're finally going to close the gender pay gap, then we have to understand the sources of it -- and also solutions and remedies for it," said study co-author Mary Rigdon, associate director of the Center for the...

PTSD Symptoms May Vary Throughout Menstrual Cycle: Study

Women's symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may vary with their menstrual cycle, which could have implications for diagnosis and treatment, researchers say.

Their study included 40 women between 18 and 33 years of age who had PTSD after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event, such as sexual violence or a serious injury.

"For women who are naturally cycling, it ma...

Too Little Vitamin D Could Raise Colon Cancer Risk in Black Women

Black American women with low levels of vitamin D have higher odds of developing colon cancer, according to a new research that echoes previous findings in white women.

Researchers used a vitamin D prediction model for nearly 50,000 participants in the Black Women's Health Study and concluded that those with predicted levels in the bottom 25% had an estimated 40% higher risk of colon canc...

Vision Troubles Could Raise Midlife Depression Risk for Women

Midlife vision problems could increase women's risk of depression, new research suggests.

Rates of eye problems and depression rise during midlife, but knowledge about how vision affects depression at that time has been limited. The new study identified a significant link between impaired vision and development of depression.

"Given that the combination of visual impairment and depr...

Laser Therapy Promises to 'Rejuvenate' Vaginal Tissue. A New Study Finds Otherwise

Laser-based vaginal "rejuvenation" is all the rage among women concerned about vaginal dryness and other "down there" symptoms of menopause, but it's buyer beware when it comes to these procedures, new research warns.

It turns out that laser-based vaginal rejuvenation may not be any better than placebo (dummy) treatment when it comes to relieving vaginal dryness, itching, burning, irritat...

Women Doctors Face Higher Levels of Harassment, Frustration: Survey

Many female family doctors face sexual harassment, but most remain satisfied with their careers, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed 315 women physicians in family practices from 49 countries and found that 75% said they were satisfied or extremely satisfied with their work conditions and their career.

"Despite all obstacles in the work environment, especially regarding the pay ...

Pandemic Stress Altered Many Women's Menstrual Cycles

From the fear of getting sick to lockdown isolation, the COVID-19 pandemic dramatically increased stress levels, and for many women, the uptick led to changes in their monthly periods.

More than half of respondents to an online survey reported changes in their menstrual cycles during the pandemic, including...

AHA News: How Black Women Can Take Control of Their Blood Pressure

Black women with high blood pressure may benefit from classes where they learn and practice skills to manage the condition, a small study finds.

In the United States, nearly 58% of Black women have high blood pressure compared to about 41% of white and Hispanic women, according to American Heart Association statistics. For Black women, death rates from high blood pressure-related causes a...

Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer May Have Long-Term Risk for the Heart

Younger women who undergo radiation for cancer in the left breast have a heightened risk of heart disease years later, a new study finds.

Among women who received radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer, 10.5% developed coronary artery disease over the next 27 years, researchers found. That was close to double the rate among women who had radiation for tumors in the right breast.

More Women Turning to Marijuana Products to Help With Menopause

Sleeplessness. Night sweats. Anxiety. Irritability. Aches and pains.

Would smoking a little pot help women deal with these common symptoms of menopause?

A good number of middle-aged women apparently think so, because they've been turning to marijuana to help handle the change of life, a new study reports.

"Midlife women within the menopause transition period of their life are ...

Migraines and More Severe Hot Flashes Could Be Linked

Women with a history of migraine headaches may suffer severe hot flashes during menopause, and this combo may boost their risk for heart disease, researchers say.

Migraine doesn't cause more or worse hot flashes — or vice versa. But both are believed to be related to changes in blood vessels known as neurovascular dysregulation, according to Dr. Stephanie Faubion, medical director of th...

Depression During Menopause: How to Spot It and Treat It

Emotional changes in the run-up to menopause can sometimes lead to depression.

It can be important to see a doctor to help determine whether you're just feeling stressed or "blue" -- or whether you might have clinical or major depression, a condition associated with a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Changing hormones during perimenopause -- the time when a woman's body is preparing...

Is Hysterectomy Always Needed for a Common, Painful Gynecologic Condition?

A hysterectomy isn't necessarily needed to treat a common women's health problem, researchers report.

Adenomyosis is abnormal tissue growth in the wall of the uterus, which causes cramps and heavy menstrual bleeding. The condition affects as many as one in three women.

But it often goes undiagnosed until it results in a hysterectomy, according to a broad review of medical literature...

Your State's Laws Might Save Your Life If Breast Cancer Strikes

When Nancy Cappello was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer in 2003, she was stunned.

How could this have happened? She went for her annual screening mammogram every year and was always told that all was fine.

It wasn't.

Cappello had dense breasts, but no one had ever told her. "The tumor was likely growing for five to seven years," said her husband, Joseph Cappello. "At th...

Mom-to-Be's 'Leaky' Heart Valves May Pose More Danger Than Thought

Leaky heart valves can put pregnant women at serious risk, according to a large study that runs counter to established practice.

The condition used to be considered relatively harmless during pregnancy. But this analysis by Johns Hopkins University researchers of more than 20,000 individual medical records reveals that heart valve disease puts women at risk for bleeding, high blood pressu...

Why Are Sports-Linked Concussions Rising Among Girls?

Sports-related head injuries in male athletes tend to grab all of the headlines, but new research shows that female athletes are also increasingly at risk.

From 2000 to 2019, there was a threefold jump in sports-linked concussions seen among high school-aged girls. These injuries were most likely to occur during soccer, basketball, cheerleading, softball and volleyball, but they also happ...

Pandemic Brought Big Drop in Breast Cancer Screening in Older, Low-Income Women

Many parts of the United States saw a significant drop in breast cancer screening of older low-income women during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

The analysis of data from 32 community health centers that serve low-income people found that breast cancer screening for 50- to 74-year-old women dropped 8% between July 2019 and July 2020. That wiped out an 18% increase between Jul...

College Is Even More Stressful for Girls: Study

Even before COVID-19, college could be a challenging experience, but a new study suggests those stresses are much higher for female students.

Still, in the face of a continuing pandemic, all students may need interventions to develop healthy coping strategies, the study authors said.

"They're balancing work, classes, relationships and family -- and then now you're throwing COVID on ...

Women May Find It Tougher to Quit Smoking Than Men

Women smokers puff fewer cigarettes than men but have more trouble quitting, French researchers report.

"Our findings highlight the need to provide smoking cessation interventions tailored to the needs of women," said Ingrid Allagbe, a doctoral student at the University of Burgundy, who led the research.

The study included nearly 38,000 smokers (about 43% women) aged 18 and older in...

Women Less Likely to Get Best Care for Deadly Form of Stroke

Women are less likely than men to get the most effective treatment for a serious type of stroke, new research shows.

Emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) is a type of ischemic stroke caused when blockages in large blood vessels cut off significant blood flow to the brain.

The most effective treatment to prevent long-term disabilities from this type of stroke is a minimally invasiv...

HRT Could Raise Odds for Asthma

Millions of women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease their transition through menopause may be unknowingly upping their risk for asthma.

The concern follows a study that spent more than two decades tracking a potential link between HRT and late-onset asthma among roughly 380,000 Danish women.

Two New York City physicians who were not involved in the study said the fi...

Acne Can Take Big Emotional Toll on Women

Acne is more than skin deep.

This is the overarching message of a new study that looked at the mental and psychological toll that acne can take on adult women.

"Some felt that their acne made them appear less professional or qualified at work, and many described that having fewer peers with acne in adulthood magnified the impact of acne on their mental health, leading to feelings of...

Why Strokes Can Affect Women, Men Differently

It is often said that stroke affects men and women differently. Now, scientists say the location of the stroke's damage in the brain may help explain why.

Women have more strokes, and are more likely to have symptoms such as fatigue and mental confusion rather than classic indications such as paralysis. Women also tend to have more severe strokes, according to the authors of a new study.<...

Primary Care Doctors Often Miss Heart Failure in Women, Black Patients

White men are more likely to a receive correct and timely diagnosis of heart failure in their primary care doctor's office compared to other types of patients, new research shows.

The serious and common heart ailment is too often missed in women, Blacks and poorer people when they see their health care provider for a regular appointment, the Stanford University researchers said.

T...

Are Antibiotics Really the Answer for UTIs in Women?

Urinary tract infections: They're the bane of millions of women, and a new study finds that many sufferers are unhappy that diagnosis and treatments are still limited for this painful condition.

One of the biggest concerns researchers found was that many women think frequent antibiotic use to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) might not be the best solution. The study also noted frustr...

Screening Often Misses Endometrial Cancer in Black Women

A noninvasive method of screening for endometrial cancer often fails to detect signs of it in Black women, a new study says.

The findings raise questions about the use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) to determine the need for a biopsy in these patients, according to the authors.

"Black women have an over 90% higher [death] rate after diagnosis of endometrial cancer when compared w...

Urinary Incontinence Can Affect a Woman's Mental Health

Millions of women are plagued by the daily disruptions of urinary incontinence, and new research suggests it might also be harming their mental health.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 10,000 adult women who took part in a Portuguese Health Ministry survey conducted every five years. Overall, one in 10 reported having urinary incontinence, but the rate was four in 10 among wo...

Pandemic Day Care Closures Forced 600,000 U.S. Working Moms to Leave Jobs

When child care centers were forced to close in the pandemic's early months, hundreds of thousands of American working mothers lost their jobs, new research shows.

The study is just the latest illustration of the toll the pandemic has taken on working women in the United States.

Over the first 10 months of the U.S. pandemic, more than 2.3 million women left the labor force, accordin...

Fertility Drugs Won't Raise Breast Cancer Risk

Women battling infertility are often given medications to help them conceive, and potential side effects are always a concern. Now, research suggests use of the drugs won't raise a woman's odds for breast cancer.

Researchers at King's College London in the United Kingdom analyzed studies from 1990 to January 2020 that included 1.8 million women of all reproductive ages who underwent ferti...

Marijuana Use Tied to Higher Odds for Thoughts of Suicide

Young adults who use marijuana appear to have an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

In fact, the risk that someone between 18 and 34 will think about, plan for or attempt suicide increases with the amount of marijuana they use, according to results published June 22 in the journal J...

It's a Myth That Promiscuous Women Have Low Self-Esteem

The old double standard lives on.

A new study finds that many people still believe -- incorrectly -- that women who engage in casual sex have low self-esteem. And they don't think the same is true of men.

"We were surprised that this stereotype was so widely held," said study first author Jaimie Arona Krems, an assistant professor of psychology at Oklahoma State University. "This st...

Fibroid Pain, Bleeding Is Driving Thousands of Women to the ER

Far too many women are showing up in U.S. emergency rooms due to fibroids, according to a new study spanning 12 years.

Fibroids are common noncancerous growths in the uterus. They don't always cause symptoms, but those that do may result in heavy menstrual bleeding and severe abdominal pain.

Fully tens of thousands of women are seen annually in the emergency department for fibroids ...

A Woman's Diet Might Help Her Avoid Breast Cancer

Women whose diets tend to feed inflammation may have a heightened risk of breast cancer, a preliminary study suggests.

The study, of more than 350,000 women, found that the more "pro-inflammatory" foods women consumed, the higher their breast cancer risk.

The term refers to foods thought to contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation throughout the body - a state implicated in vari...

Aortic Tears Are Even More Deadly for Women, Study Finds

Women may have different symptoms and are more likely to die after acute aortic dissection than men, a new study finds.

Up to 40% of patients die instantly from this spontaneous tear in one of the body's main arteries, and the risk of death increases about 1% for every hour of delay in diagnosis and surgery, according to the findings published online June 2 in The Annals of Thoracic S...

Moderate Use of Hair Relaxers Won't Raise Black Women's Cancer Risk: Study

Moderate use of hair relaxers doesn't increase a Black woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.

"While there is biologic plausibility that exposure to some components contained in hair relaxers might increase breast cancer risk, the evidence from epidemiologic studies to date continues to be inconsistent," said lead author Kimberly Bertrand, an epidemiologist and assistant...

Osteoporosis Might Also Raise a Woman's Odds for Hearing Loss

It's a connection most women may not be aware of, but a new study suggests osteoporosis may raise your risk of hearing loss, and the drugs often used to treat thinning bones won't lower that risk.

According to researcher Dr. Sharon Curhan, data from her team's new study suggests that "osteoporosis and low bone density may be important contributors to aging-related hearing loss."

Tha...

'Yo-Yo' Dieting May Mean Sleepless Nights for Women

So-called yo-yo dieting may increase a woman's risk of insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep problems, a new study suggests.

Yo-yo dieting -- formally called weight cycling -- is defined as losing and regaining 10 pounds or more when not pregnant.

The study included more than 500 women in every stage of adult life, including childbearing, premenopausal, menopausal and postmenopausal...

Gluten Doesn't Trigger 'Brain Fog' for Women Without Celiac Disease: Study

Going gluten-free is a trend that touts benefits for the mind and body, but a new study finds no evidence that gluten is bad for your brain.

Among nearly 13,500 middle-aged women, researchers found no connection between eating wheat, barley or rye (the sources of gluten) and mental ability.

According to the study authors, the only folks who benefit mentally from avoiding gluten are...

When Diabetes Strikes in Pregnancy, Do Women Eat Healthier?

Women who develop diabetes in pregnancy don't tend to make healthy diet or exercise changes to help fight it, a new study finds.

That could have dire consequences: Gestational (pregnancy-related) diabetes raises the risks of high blood pressure in mothers, larger babies, cesarean delivery, low blood sugar in newborns, and development of chronic diabetes later in life.

Moms-to-be who...

Smoggy Air Might Raise Black Women's Odds for Fibroids


TUESDAY, May 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) - Exposure to ozone air pollution may make Black women more likely to develop fibroids.

Compared to women exposed to the lowest levels of the pollutant, Black women exposed to the highest levels had a 35% increased risk for developing the non-cancerous growths in and around their uterus. The link was even stronger among women younger than...

Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

When young women land in the emergency room with chest pain, they wait longer and get less treatment than their male counterparts, a preliminary study finds.

Using a federal survey of U.S. hospitals, researchers found that younger women with chest pain were treated less urgently than men their age. That included a lower likelihood of receiving standard tests for diagnosing a heart attack....

Pregnancy Within 1 Year of Weight-Loss Surgery Carries Added Risks

Women who get pregnant within a year of having weight-loss surgery are more likely to have preterm and smaller-than-normal babies, a new study suggests.

Dutch researchers said their findings support current recommendations to avoid pregnancy for 12 to 24 months after weight-loss (bariatric) surgery.

"We should encourage women who wish to conceive after bariatric surgery to avoid pre...

Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women

Young Black American women have high rates of lifestyle-related risk factors for heart disease, a new study indicates.

The findings show the need to help them adopt healthy eating and physical activity habits, as well as make it easier for them to access health care, the researchers said.

"Young people should be the healthiest members of our population, with normal body weight and n...

A Vitamin Could Be Key to Women's Pain After Knee Replacement

Older women with low levels of vitamin D may have more pain after total knee replacement than those with adequate levels of the nutrient, a new study suggests.

Vitamin D is an important part of a healthy diet, and its benefits include protecting against bone disease and maintaining soft tissue health.

Estrogen deficiency, inactivity and a lack of sun exposure have been linked w...

Obamacare Gave More Breast Cancer Survivors Access to Breast Reconstruction

Breast reconstruction rates rose significantly among Black women after Obamacare expanded access to Medicaid, a new study says.

It also found a large increase in reconstruction rates among women with lower income and education levels.

The findings suggest "that Medicaid expansion was highly effective in doing what it was supposed to do -- breaking down barriers to care," said lead r...

Better Sleep May Mean Better Sex for Women

Good sleep might be the best prescription for sexual satisfaction among older women, a new study suggests.

Women who did not routinely get restful slumber were nearly twice as likely to report sexual problems, such as lack of desire or arousal, researchers found.

"Sexual dysfunction…is defined as the presence of sexual problems associated with distress, and this relationship was s...

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