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Health News Results - 14

'Meatless Monday' Can Help Change Diets for Good

Many people who tried going meatless one day a week to call attention to food and climate change continued after the campaign ended, a new study says.

Researchers surveyed 320 households from Bedford, N.Y., that took part in the town's "Meatless Monday" campaign in 2018. For 12 weeks, participants ate no meat one day a week.

In a survey six months later, nearly 57% of re...

Stricter Arsenic Standard Made Public Drinking Water Safer: Study

Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water systems in violation fell from 1.3% in 2008 ...

A Simple Way to Help Prevent Child Obesity

Kids who don't drink water take in nearly 100 more calories from sugary drinks every day than those who do, according to a recent Penn State study.

About one-fifth of children fall into the no-water group.

But a multi-year experiment in the New York City public schools involving more than 1 million students found that installing water dispensers in school can change that. Ha...

Many U.S. Kids Don't Drink Enough Water, and Obesity May Be the Result

On any given day, 1 in 5 American youngsters don't drink any water at all, a new survey shows.

And those who don't end up consuming almost twice as many calories from sugar-sweetened beverages.

That, investigators warn, translates into an extra 100 calories per day, which over time can raise the risk for becoming overweight or obese.

"Drinking water is the healthie...

Attention, Seniors: Drink More Water and Head Off Disease

Not drinking enough water is a common but under-recognized problem among American seniors that puts their health at risk, researchers say.

"So many health issues are related to inadequate hydration," including urinary tract and respiratory infections, frequent falls and other problems, said study author Janet Mentes. She's a professor of nursing at the University of California, Los An...

Are Enhanced Waters Better for Your Health?

You'll find plenty of nutrient-enriched flavored waters on grocery shelves, but are they any better for your diet than a glass of water with a squeeze of lemon?

Many drinks promise health benefits, from more energy and better exercise performance to a stronger immune system. The latest fad is alkaline water, with claims that its manipulated pH has health benefits. But none of the clai...

Hydrate Right, Your Kidneys Will Thank You

Downing the wrong type of drink when you exercise could put you at risk of kidney disease, a new study warns.

Specifically, the threat is from having sugary, caffeinated soft drinks during exertion in a hot environment, according to researchers at the University at Buffalo in New York.

The small study included 12 healthy adults who did long stretches of exercise in a laborat...

Is All Well With Your Drinking Water?

More than 15 million homes in the United States get their water from private wells, according to federal estimates.

While the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates public drinking water, people with private wells need to check their water themselves, along with other maintenance steps.

This is especially important if you're thinking about having a baby. Many studies...

Drinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIs

Women plagued by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) may look no farther than their kitchen tap for relief, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that women who drank plenty of water had a significant reduction in their odds for a recurrence of the common infections.

"This study provides convincing evidence that increased daily intake of water can reduce frequent UTI...

More Water, Mom? H2O Is Top Kids' Beverage in U.S.

U.S. kids are drinking far more water than sodas and fruit drinks, health officials say.

A new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that water accounts for almost half of kids' total beverage consumption.

And together, water and milk comprised about two-thirds of the beverages consumed by Americans aged 2 o 19 between 2013 and 2016.

...

Rehydration: How Much Is Too Much?

Staying hydrated is a mantra not only when exercising, but throughout the day for optimal health.

Yet it's possible to get too much of a good thing.

In recent years, a number of athletes have died from a condition called exercise-associated hyponatremia, or EAH, which results from overwhelming the kidneys with excess fluid and upsetting the body's natural balance of sodium. ...

July Is Peak Time for Illness From Poop in Pools: CDC

Is it safe to go in the water this summer? Not if microscopic germs like E. coli or cryptosporidium are swimming in the pool with you, U.S. health officials warn.

"These germs make people sick when they swallow water contaminated with poop," the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated frankly in a news release on Thursday.

The statement accompanied a new repo...

Does Salt Water Help Your Cut? And Other Health Myths of Summer

It's often said salt water is good for cuts. Or that sunscreen isn't needed on cloudy days.

But both are incorrect, says Isabel Valdez, a physician assistant and instructor of family medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

When you head outdoors this summer, you should be aware of some common health myths, she noted.

"Salt water from the beach can actual...

Health Tips for Summer Fun

Summertime means fun time, but you still need to follow some basic health and safety precautions.

Dehydration is a common summer problem and often results in dizziness, dry mouth and lightheadedness. But it also can be more severe, according to Dr. Ravi Rao, a family medicine physician at Penn State's medical center.

Mild dehydration can be corrected by drinking water or oth...