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For People With PAD, Exercise Can Be Tough But Rewarding

Fast-paced walking is painful for the millions of people with peripheral artery disease (PAD). But new research shows that a slower, pain-free pace won't cut it if improvement in mobility is the goal.

The study included more than 300 of the roughly 8.5 million Americans with PAD. It's a condition in which plaque build-up in arteries slows the flow of blood to the legs.

"People ...

Jail Dims Hopes for Recovery for Young People With Mental Illness

Being jailed puts teens with untreated psychiatric disorders at increased risk for long-term mental health struggles, researchers say.

"These are not necessarily bad kids, but they have many strikes against them," said study lead author Linda Teplin. "Physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect are common. These experiences can precipitate depression. Incarceration should be the last resort....

What Is Endometriosis, and How Is It Treated?

There's no cure for endometriosis, but women have several treatment options for the painful condition, an expert says.

With endometriosis, tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of it, where it can reach the fallopian tubes, ovaries, bowel, bladder, diaphragm and, more rarely, other parts of the body. It can reduce fertility.

Symptoms can include chronic p...

Why Are Half of U.S. Kids With Mental Health Issues Not Getting Treatment?

Over half of high-risk children in the United States are not receiving behavioral health services critical to their mental, emotional and physical well-being, new research warns.

"It's a pretty simple and kind of widely agreed upon finding that there are a lot of at-risk kids, when you look at it in terms of adversities or symptoms, who aren't getting mental health services, behavioral he...

Drug Shows Promise Against Rare Condition That Stunts Kids' Growth

A new medication may offer hope to children with achondroplasia, a rare bone growth disorder that causes very short stature coupled with disproportionate limb and trunk size.

The experimental drug is called vosoritide. By tamping down overactive growth plate signaling that impedes bone growth, the drug seeks to offer affected children the possibility of greater height and improved proport...

New Thyroid Eye Disease Treatment Could Harm Hearing

The first drug approved in the United States to treat thyroid eye disease may come with an unwelcome side effect for many: A small, new study finds that up to two-thirds of patients who take the medication experience hearing problems.

Teprotumumab (Tepezza) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in January 2020. In two clinical trials conducted before FDA approval of the dr...

Cancer Survivors May Face Higher Odds for Heart Trouble

Cancer survivors, especially older ones, have an increased risk of heart disease over the next decade, a new study finds.

Ohio State University researchers analyzed data from more than 15,000 U.S. adults, aged 40 to 79, who were followed from 2007 to 2016. At the start of the study period, 13% reported a history of cancer but none had a history of heart disease.

Over the next decade...

Lockdowns Are Putting People With Eating Disorders in Crisis

At Eating Recovery Center, which offers treatment and services for people who have eating disorders, intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs were switched to virtual when the pandemic began.

But that didn't sit well with people who were working on their recovery.

"Our patients said, 'You can't do this. This is not enough support for us,'" said Ellen Astrachan-Fletc...

On-the-Road Help: 'Mobile Stroke Units' Are Saving People's Lives

Time is never more precious than in the minutes after a stroke. Now, research is confirming that a "mobile stroke unit" can rush aid to patients quickly, potentially saving lives.

"Patients who are treated early benefit from a complete reversal of stroke symptoms and avoidance of disability," said lead study author Dr. James Grotta. He is director of stroke research at the Clinical Instit...

Certain HIV Meds Have Patients Packing on Pounds

A commonly prescribed component of the life-saving antiretroviral drug cocktails used to treat HIV may trigger weight gain, new research warns.

The concern stems from tracking patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since the mid-1990s, the therapy has relied on various drug combinations to essentially outwit HIV, controlling viral loads and turning a once-deadly infection into a ma...

Minutes Mean Months: Getting Stroke Care Fast Is Vital, Study Confirms

For someone suffering a severe stroke, every 10 minutes that goes by before treatment starts in the emergency room may cost eight weeks of a healthy life, Canadian researchers report.

In fact, delays in the hospital may have worse consequences for recovery than delays in getting to the hospital, they noted.

"Our study confirmed that any delay in delivering appropriate stroke treatme...

Could Low-Dose Aspirin Help Shield You From COVID-19?

It's already being taken by millions to help ward off heart issues, and now preliminary research hints that daily low-dose aspirin might also cut your odds of contracting COVID-19.

As the Israeli research team noted, aspirin is an anti-inflammatory and previous studies have shown that it may help the immune system combat some viral infections. According to the researchers, aspirin was wid...

Could a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?

Just two weeks of treatment with an experimental drug can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes by several years, researchers report.

The drug, called teplizumab, is already under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration based on earlier evidence of its effectiveness.

If it gets the green light, it would become the first drug approved for delaying type 1 diabetes in high-risk pe...

No Sense of Smell After COVID? Therapies Can Help Bring It Back

So, you had COVID-19 a few months back and you still can't smell that first steaming cup of coffee in the morning. Is there anything you can do to hasten the return of that vital sense?

Experts say there is, including "physical therapy" for your nose.

"In most cases, smell loss is temporary, but it can take months or even years to recover," said researcher Dr. Tran Locke. She's an a...

Opioid Addiction Relapse May Be Different for Men, Women

Who is more likely to relapse after opioid addiction treatment -- women or men?

A new study that followed 1,100 recovering opioid users reveals that their risks are different.

The researchers followed the men and women for one year after treatment at more than 100 substance-use treatment facilities across the United States. During that time, 55% of the women and 51.5% of the men use...

Does an Arthritis Drug Help Patients Battling Severe COVID? It Depends on the Study

Two new studies suggest that the jury is still out on whether the arthritis drug tocilizumab helps those with severe COVID-19.

Both reports were published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. The first, from scientists at the University of California, San Diego, found tocilizumab didn't improve outcomes or reduce the risk of death in patients with severe COVID-19 pneu...

Could ADHD Raise Odds for More Serious Psychiatric Ills?

As if attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) isn't already tough on a child, new research suggests the condition might also raise the odds for a psychotic disorder later in life.

But parents should not panic.

"I would say that this finding should not be an alarm for parents and people who have ADHD, because the absolute risk for psychotic disorders remains low," sa...

Stem Cell Injections Show Early Promise Against Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal cord injuries can be devastating to the more than 17,000 Americans who suffer them each year. But many patients may have new reason for hope: Early research suggests infusions of stem cells could help them regain lost sensation and movement.

These improvements may occur within days or weeks of receiving the stem cell therapy, and can last at least six months, according to the small...

Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds May Help Fight Severe COVID-19

Rheumatoid arthritis drugs may save lives of patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19, according to a groundbreaking clinical trial.

The findings, first announced in January, have now been peer-reviewed and published in a major medical journal.

"We are delighted that our full results are now published after peer review. This confirms the robustness of our findings, that t...

Pandemic Putting Added Strain on Parents of Kids With Cancer

A cancer diagnosis for your child is devastating enough, but new research shows the coronavirus pandemic has made the battle even harder for many families.

"Parents and caregivers of children who have cancer are already under tremendous stress," said study author Kyle Walsh, an associate professor in the department of neurosurgery at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. "And while the pandemi...

COVID No More Deadly for People With Asthma, Large Study Shows

During the pandemic, people with asthma have worried that their respiratory condition might raise their risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19, but new research findings should calm their fears.

After analyzing data from 57 studies that included a total of over 587,000 people, scientists discovered that rates of asthma among people with COVID-19 were similar to rates in the general...

New Variants Mean COVID Vaccines, Tests May Need Tweaking: FDA

The emergence of new SARS-CoV-2 variants could require a quick pivot on the part of pharmaceutical and medical device companies, to help stay one step ahead of COVID-19.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines Monday encouraging drug and test developers to pay attention to new coronavirus variants and be prepared to make that pivot if necessary.

The guidance provides...

New Hope for Better Treatments Against Macular Degeneration

A number of new treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a progressive eye disease, are under development. AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in older people.

About 11 million Americans have AMD, which affects part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD is treated with eye injections every month or two, and dry AMD with an...

Insight Into Why a Prostate Cancer Therapy Works Better for Black Men

Higher levels of a certain type of immune cell may explain why immunotherapy for prostate cancer is more effective in Black men than in white men, researchers say.

The finding could lead to immunotherapy-based precision treatment for localized aggressive and advanced prostate cancer in all races.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 1,300 prostate tumor samples and found that, on...

New Rabies Prevention Treatment Also Works in Kids: Study

Getting bitten by a dog or wild animal is frightening, especially for kids, but a new study may help relieve some of the worry about catching rabies.

The rabies prevention treatment KEDRAB is safe and effective for patients 17 and younger, a groundbreaking pediatric clinical trial has shown.

The trial included 30 kids with suspected or confirmed rabies exposure who were treated with...

Even Low-Intensity Exercise Can Help During Cancer Treatments

If you have cancer and you're trying to exercise to boost your health, new research suggests you don't have to knock yourself out during your workout.

Light exercise is just as beneficial as more demanding workouts for cancer patients, the researchers found.

Previous research has shown that physical activity can improve cancer patients' physical and mental health, reduce fatigue and...

Interferon Shot Might Keep COVID-19 Patients Out of the Hospital

An experimental antiviral drug known as peginterferon lambda can speed up COVID-19 patients' ability to shed the virus and recover, scientists report.

"One of the important things about this treatment that's different from the other things that have been studied for COVID-19 is that this is working on the person, not on the virus. So it doesn't depend at all on the strain or the sequence ...

Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

The team from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., led by Sayeh Nikpay, now an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota...

Drug Combo May Boost Survival for Tough-to-Treat Liver Cancers

A new drug combination for advanced liver cancer can extend people's lives substantially more than the long-standing drug of choice, new study findings confirm.

The treatment involves two drugs approved to fight various cancers: bevacizumab (Avastin) and atezolizumab (Tecentriq). Avastin, an intravenous (IV) drug, starves tumors by preventing new blood vessel growth.

Tecentriq, also...

Could a Common Prostate Drug Help Prevent Parkinson's?

While scientists still don't know what causes Parkinson's disease, new research shows an association between a drug that some men take for an enlarged prostate condition and a reduced risk of developing the illness.

A team led by scientists at the University of Iowa, working in collaboration with researchers in Denmark and China, found that the drug terazosin and similar medications may h...

Too Many U.S. Doctors Biased Against Patients With Disabilities: Study

Dr. Lisa Iezzoni is all too familiar with the discrimination that patients who have a disability can face: Having lived with multiple sclerosis for more than four decades and now in a wheelchair, she has also studied health care experiences and outcomes for people with disabilities for more than 20 years.

But her new survey on doctors' attitudes towards disabled patients still surprised h...

Kiss Chapped Lips Goodbye This Winter

Dry and chapped lips are common during the winter, but there are a number of things you can do to protect them, an expert says.

"Cold, dry weather; sun damage; and frequently licking your lips are just some of the reasons your lips might feel dry and chapped this winter," dermatologist Dr. Noëlle Sherber said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Understanding these causes...

Strong Blood Thinners May Help COVID Patients, But Degree of Illness Is Key

Full doses of blood thinners can benefit patients hospitalized with COVID-19, but the severity of their illness matters, researchers say.

The new global analysis found that hospitalized patients with moderate COVID-19 may benefit from the drugs' clot-preventing powers, but patients with illness so severe it requires admission to an intensive care unit may not.

"SARS-CoV-2 infectio...

FDA Approves First Once-a-Month HIV Therapy

The first monthly shots to treat adults with HIV were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday.

"Currently, the standard of care for patients with HIV includes patients taking daily pills to adequately manage their condition. This approval will allow some patients the option of receiving once-monthly injections in lieu of a daily oral treatment regimen," said Dr. John...

Could Stem Cell Therapy Be a Breakthrough Against MS?

Stem cell transplants may have long-lasting benefits for some people with aggressive cases of multiple sclerosis, a new study suggests.

Italian researchers found that among 210 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who received a stem cell transplant -- with cells from their own blood -- two-thirds saw no worsening in their disability 10 years out.

That included 71% of patients with rela...

A Promising New Therapy Against OCD?

Noninvasive electrical stimulation of the brain, fine-tuned to specific "circuitry" gone awry, might help ease obsessive-compulsive behaviors, an early study hints.

Researchers found that the brain stimulation, delivered over five days, reduced obsessive-compulsive tendencies for three months, though in people who did not have full-blown obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

It's too...

New Hope Against Diseases Marked by Progressive Scarring of Lung Tissue

An inhaled medication might make every day physical activity a bit easier for patients with serious scarring of the lungs, a new clinical trial finds.

The study, published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved patients with high blood pressure in the lungs caused by interstitial lung disease (ILD).

ILD is a broad term for progressive scarring of th...

Stuck at Home, Suffering With COVID? Experts Offer Guidance on Care

Most folks infected with COVID-19 will only have mild or moderate illness -- but that means they'll still be stuck at home and feeling really lousy.

What's the best way to cope?

In many ways, you want to behave as you would if you were suffering from a cold or the flu, said infectious disease expert Dr. Aaron Glatt.

"The general good advice we give to people is eat well, make ...

Crowdsourcing Raises Billions for Families Hit Hard by Medical Bills

You have probably seen the social media posts: Your good friend's co-worker is raising money online to help pay for cancer treatments or another friend needs funds to pay medical bills after a car crash.

Crowdsourced fundraising seems to, at least partly, fill a gap between out-of-pocket health care costs and what people can afford.

A new study looked at what the role of one of the ...

COVID Survivors' Plasma Might Prevent Worsening Illness in Older Patients: Study

Blood plasma from people recovering from COVID-19 could help prevent severe illness in older patients newly infected with the virus, a small new Argentinian study finds.

The findings give new hope to the notion that so-called "convalescent plasma" might have a role to play in treating COVID-19. Earlier studies had been disappointing, showing the treatment had little effect on people with...

Health Care After COVID: The Rise of Telemedicine

In late December, Dr. Ada Stewart asked her staff to check on a patient who had missed an appointment.

She soon learned that the patient had no transportation for the 45-minute drive, so Stewart offered to conduct the appointment by phone instead.

"It still accomplished so much. I was able to see how their diabetes was doing, how they were preparing for the holiday seaso...

Trials Find Full-Dose Blood Thinners May Harm, Not Help, COVID Patients in ICU

Because COVID-19 is known to raise the odds for dangerous blood clots, blood thinners have quickly become part of routine care for many hospitalized patients.

But three clinical trials testing full doses of these drugs in COVID-19 patients have now paused recruitment of critically ill patients because the medications could end up doing more harm than good.

According to experts at th...

Women Less Likely to Survive Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Women who are resuscitated from cardiac arrest are less likely to receive two common treatments once they arrive at the hospital, and are much more likely to die while hospitalized than men, a new study finds.

The researchers analyzed data gathered on nearly 4,900 resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in the United States and Canada from 2010 to 2015. Of those, just over 37...

For Cancer Patients, Holiday Season Can Be a Stressful Time

The holiday season can be difficult for people with cancer, especially with the added stress of the COVID-19 pandemic this year.

As they undergo treatment and cope with symptoms and side effects, they may struggle to get any pleasure from the season, according to the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

Emotional and physical fatigue can make it hard for cancer patients to take p...

A Better, Safer Way to Rid Some Kids of Seizures?

Children with tough-to-treat epilepsy now have another choice to help them live a life free of seizures, a new study suggests.

MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive procedure for kids who have drug-resistant epilepsy, is successful in more than half of all cases and has a short recovery time, researchers report.

To arrive at that conclusion, the inves...

Could Gene Therapy Cure Sickle Cell Disease? Two New Studies Raise Hopes

A pair of new gene therapies promise a potentially lasting cure for sickle cell disease by subtly altering the genetic information in patients' bone marrow cells, researchers report.

Both therapies work by switching on a gene that promotes production of fetal hemoglobin, said Dr. Lewis Hsu, chief medical officer of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America.

Sickle cell dis...

Another Study Casts Doubt on 'Convalescent Plasma' as COVID-19 Treatment

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, anecdotal reports suggested that infusing very sick patients with the blood plasma of people who'd survived the disease might help boost outcomes.

But study findings released Nov. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, along with disappointing results from prior trials, suggest that those initial hopes may have been unfounded.

The new stu...

Family Tragedy Has Mindy Kaling Speaking Out on Pancreatic Cancer

When actor, writer and producer Mindy Kaling's mom was fighting pancreatic cancer, it was the biggest struggle the family had ever experienced.

Swati Chokalingam, a Boston-area obstetrician/gynecologist and Kaling's mom, died in 2012 after getting a stage 4 diagnosis eight months earlier.

Now Kaling is raising awareness for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) as official b...

U.S. Daily COVID Case Count Nears Record for Pandemic

The United States on Thursday recorded its second highest daily total of new coronavirus cases since the pandemic began, with 75,000 new infections, while eight states broke single-day records of new cases.

Also on Thursday, the antiviral medicine remdesivir became the first drug to gain U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to fight COVID-19.

Such drugs are urgently n...

Could Common Asthma Meds Weaken Bones?

People who use common asthma controller medications are vulnerable to developing brittle bones and suffering fractures, a new study shows.

The findings point the finger at anti-inflammatory corticosteroids -- whether taken by pill or inhaler.

Corticosteroids are widely used to prevent asthma attacks, particularly in the form of inhalers. When asthma is more difficult to cont...