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Are Pins or a Cast Better for a Broken Wrist?

A cast is as good as metal pins for treating a broken wrist, researchers report.

A broken wrist in which bone fragments move out of their normal alignment is called a displaced wrist fracture. After the bones are put back in place, they're typically held in position by a molded plaster cast or by pins/pla...

Is a Night in the Hospital Necessary After Hip, Knee Replacement?

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- For many people undergoing total hip or knee replacement, same-day surgery is a safe option, new research shows.

Among folks in overall good health, the study of nearly 1.8 million patients found similar post-op complication rates among those who had outpatient joint replacement surgery compared to those who spent a night or ...

Exercise Soon After Breast Plastic Surgery Is Safe, Healthy

While some plastic surgeons recommend no exercise for weeks after breast augmentation, new research suggests the ban may not be necessary.

A new clinical trial found that women who resumed exercise after one week off did not have more complicati...

Are Opioid Painkillers Needed Weeks After Heart Surgery? Maybe Not

Recovery from heart surgery can bring some pain. But a new study suggests patients don't need potentially addictive prescription opioids to control that post-op discomfort.

"This study shows that discharge without opioid pain medicine after cardiac surgery is extremely well tolerated...

Poor Outcome More Likely When Patient Is Female, Surgeon Is Male: Study

You can’t always choose who operates on you, especially in an emergency, but the sex of your surgeon shouldn’t matter, should it?

It just may, according to a

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 13, 2021
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  • U.S. Surgery Rates Rebounded Quickly After Pandemic Shutdowns

    U.S. operating rooms got busy once again soon after the first round of pandemic shutdowns, according to a study that challenges the widely held belief that operations have been curtailed indefinitely during the age of COVID-19.

    "It's an untold story," said senior study author Dr. Sherry Wren, a professor of general surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine, in California. "It's t...

    Removing Ovaries During Hysterectomy Before 50 Can Bring Health Risks

    New research on hysterectomies among women who don’t have cancer determined there is an age at which it is safer to also remove the ovaries and fallopian tubes and an age at which it isn't.

    Canadian scientists studied the cases of more than 200,500 women who had a hysterectomy for noncancerous reasons. They found an increased risk of death in women under 50 when the ovaries and fallopia...

    Cataract Surgery Might Lower Your Odds for Dementia

    People who undergo surgery to treat cataracts may have a lower likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

    Of more than 3,000 older adults with the eye disease, those who had surgery were about 30% less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the coming years, researchers found.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 7, 2021
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  • Black Women Have Triple the Odds for Lymphedema After Breast Cancer Surgery

    A condition called lymphedema is a well-known side effect of breast cancer treatment that can lead to swelling in the arms and legs.

    New research suggests that Black women experience are at more than three times the risk of this painful issue compared to white women.

    "Lymphedema worsens quality of life for breast cancer patients," said the study's lead author, Dr. Andrea Barrio. S...

    FDA Approves Imaging Drug That Can Help Surgeons Spot Ovarian Cancers

    Early detection of ovarian cancer helps boost a woman's survival, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a new imaging drug that can help spot tumors during surgery.

    The drug, Cytalux (pafolacianine), is meant to improve a surgeon's ability to detect ovarian cancer while operating on a patient.

    It is administered intravenously before surgery and is used in conj...

    What You Need to Know About Stomach Cancer

    New treatment options are giving hope to patients with stomach cancer.

    Also known as gastric cancer, the disease is the world's sixth most common cancer with 1.09 million new cases in 2020, according to the World Health Organization.

    It's an abnormal growth of cells that can affect any part of the stomach, but typically forms in the main part.

    "I tell patients who have been re...

    Addictive Opioid Painkillers Might Not Be Needed After Knee Surgery

    Addictive opioid painkillers aren't the only option for patients seeking relief following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) knee reconstruction, researchers say.

    As the United States wrestles with skyrocketing rates of opioid abuse and drug overdose deaths, the findings may come as good news.

    After ACL surgery, Advil and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminop...

    Blood Pressure During Surgery May Be Crucial After Spinal Cord Injury

    Tight blood pressure control -- not too high and not too low -- during surgery for spinal cord injuries may improve patients' outcomes, a new study suggests.

    "Damage to neurons in spinal cord injuries leads to dysregulation of blood pressure, which in turn limits the supply of blood and oxygen to stressed spinal cord tissue, exacerbating spinal neuron death," said co-lead author Abel Torr...

    Advances in Care, Impact of COVID Highlights of Latest Cardiologists' Meeting

    The COVID-19 pandemic, heart-healthy eating, and better ways to treat and prevent heart disease were among the hot topics that emerged during the American Heart Association's annual meeting this week.

    "I was at the sessions yesterday, I was actually in clinic this morning, and there were things I learned at the sessions that are affecting how I care for my patients," Dr. Manesh Patel, cha...

    Low-Dose CT Scans Can Diagnose Appendicitis

    CT scans expose patients to radiation even as they help doctors spot serious health problems. Now a new study finds low-dose scans can readily spot appendicitis while reducing patients' radiation exposure.

    "The results of this study suggest that the diagnostic CT scan radiation dose can be significantly decreased without impairing diagnostic accuracy," said lead study author Paulina Salmi...

    Exercise Helps Ease Arm, Shoulder Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    Arm and shoulder pain are common for women after breast cancer surgery, and beginning a supervised exercise program soon afterwards can go a long way to easing the discomfort, new research suggests.

    As the team of British investigators explained, restricted shoulder movement and chronic pain or swelling in the armpit area can really impact a patient's recovery and quality of life.

    ...

    Sexism May Play Role in Who Performs Your Surgery

    Male doctors are much more likely to refer patients to male surgeons, rather than send them to female surgeons with equal qualifications and experience, a new study finds.

    "During my 20 years in practice, I always had the sense it was easier for my male surgical colleagues to get referrals than it was for me, and the patients they were referred were more likely to need surgery," said seni...

    Hip Replacements on the Rise Among the Very Young

    It may look like bad news, but a new study says it's not: The number of people younger than 21 who had total hip replacement surgery in the United States jumped from 347 in 2000 to 551 in 2016.

    The increase wasn't due to a rise in the number of children with inflammatory arthritis, which often prompts a hip replacement in the very young. That suggests that non-surgical treatments to contr...

    Most Americans Would Skip Opioids After Surgery If They Could: Survey

    More than two-thirds of Americans would be willing to try alternatives to prescription opioids to control pain after surgery, a new survey shows.

    The United States is grappling with an opioid addiction crisis, and it's common for addiction to begin when patients get painkillers after surgery or an injury.

    The survey of more than 2,000 U.S. adults aged 18 and older found that four ou...

    Study Compares Bypass, Stenting for Patients With Severe Heart Disease

    Bypass surgery is slightly better overall than stenting to open blocked arteries in people with severe coronary artery disease, new research shows.

    But decisions may still need to be made on a case-by-case basis: Stenting appeared more beneficial in some patients, particularly if they didn't have complex disease.

    The findings should help guide decisions about which treatment is best...

    Shorter Course of Post-Op Radiation May Work Well for Prostate Cancer Patients

    After prostate cancer surgery, men can safely undergo fewer radiation treatments at higher doses, a new clinical trial shows.

    Researchers found that the shorter regimen — given over five weeks, instead of seven — did not raise patients' odds of lasting side effects.

    Safety has been a "major concern" because when patients have fewer radiation treatments, the daily dose needs to b...

    Routine Ventilation of Surgical Patients Won't Raise COVID Transmission Risk

    Routine face mask ventilation during an operation doesn't increase the surgical team's risk of coronavirus infection, according to a new study.

    Face mask ventilation is typically used for surgical patients under general anesthesia. However, its designation as an "aerosol-generating procedure" by the World Health Organization has altered operating room procedures and efficiency during the ...

    Cataracts Tied to Higher Odds of Death From Heart Disease

    Cataracts, a common eye disorder that often comes with age, may also be linked to a heightened risk of death from heart disease, new research shows.

    Experts stressed that the finding doesn't mean that cataracts somehow cause heart trouble, and the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect.

    "A variety of medical conditions like [high blood pressure], diabetes or smoking have be...

    Gender-Affirming Mastectomies Give Boost to Patients' Mental Health

    Gender-affirming breast removal (mastectomy) can greatly enhance a patients' mental well-being, a new study finds.

    Gender-affirming mastectomy is the most common type of gender-confirming surgery, but there's "not a lot of information out there about how exactly these types of surgeries help people," said study co-author Dr. Megan Lane. She is a plastic surgery resident at Michigan Medic...

    Acupuncture During a Knee Replacement Could Lessen Post-Surgical Pain

    After knee replacement surgery, many patients experience a level of pain that has them reaching for prescription opioid painkillers. Now new research suggests that using acupuncture during the operation may help reduce that pain without raising the risk of addiction.

    "The opioid epidemic has been in the news and on our minds for years and has created an urgency for us to seek alternatives...

    Surgery Often a Gateway to Opioid Abuse, Study Confirms

    Surgery is a common gateway to opioid misuse that can put patients at risk of an overdose.

    That's the conclusion of a new analysis of data from nearly 14,000 adults who had surgery between 2013 and 2019 at UCLA hospitals. All were opioid-naive, meaning they had not filled a prescription for an opioid painkiller for up to one year before their surgery.

    Afterward, they were prescribed...

    1 in 7 Cancer Patients Worldwide Missed a Surgery Due to Pandemic

    In yet another illustration of how the pandemic wreaked havoc on medical care, a new report shows that 15% of adult cancer patients worldwide didn't get potentially lifesaving surgery due to COVID-19 lockdowns.

    "Our research reveals the collateral impact of lockdowns on patients awaiting cancer surgery during the pandemic. Whilst lockdowns are critical to saving lives and reducing the spr...

    Weight Loss Surgery a Good Option for Severely Obese Kids: Study

    Severely obese children who are unable to slim down should be eligible for weight loss surgery, a new study suggests.

    The gastric sleeve procedure is safe and effective long-term, said a research team that followed participants as young as 5 for a decade.

    "Lack of long-term data and some pediatricians' fears that bariatric [weight loss] surgery might affect children's linear g...

    Telemedicine Gets High Marks for Follow-Ups After Surgery

    After routine surgery, a "virtual" follow-up visit might be just as good as a traditional office appointment, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that surgery patients who had video follow-up appointments were just as satisfied with their care as those who made a trip to the office. And they appreciated the convenience of skipping the commute and the doctor's waiting room.

    The p...

    Flat-Footed: What Works Best to Fix 'Fallen Arches'?

    If you have fallen arches, you know just how debilitating they can be.

    Now, doctors have some new guidance on which patients with this condition -- also called flat feet -- would benefit most from surgery.

    "Roughly half of patients will need surgery," said Dr. Scott Ellis, a foot and ankle surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York and senior author of a new study. "If ...

    How Common Is Opioid Misuse Among Seniors After Hip Surgery?

    Many seniors who undergo surgery after breaking a hip continue to take opioids long after being released from the hospital, new research indicates.

    After tracking nearly 30,000 U.S. older patients, investigators found that nearly 17% were still taking opioids as much as half a year after hip surgery. At three months after surgery, that figure was nearly 70%, while almost 84% of the patien...

    Recent COVID-19 Raises Odds for Clots After Surgery by 90%

    COVID-19 infection significantly increases the risk of dangerous blood clots after surgery, a new study finds.

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potential complication of surgery in which blood clots form in the veins. It is a leading preventable cause of death in hospital patients.

    This study found that VTEs were 50% more likely after surgery in patients with a current COVID infect...

    How Did New 'Surprise Medical Bill' Laws Affect Your State?

    Anesthesia is a vital part of almost every surgery, but unexpected bills for the service can cause a lot of pain. Now, a new study finds that these costs fell in several states that introduced legislation targeting "surprise" billing.

    "These price declines show that state surprise billing laws both directly lower out-of-network prices and indirectly lower in-network prices, providing evid...

    Barnacles Inspire a Better Way to Seal Off Wounds

    Barnacles may be the bane of ships, but they could point to new ways to quickly halt severe bleeding, researchers report.

    Barnacles are small crustaceans that attach to rocks, ship hulls and even other animals, such as whales. Their ability to cling to surfaces that are often wet and dirty caught the attention of researchers trying to find new ways to seal wounds in emergency situations.<...

    Pre-Surgery COVID Precautions Tied to Worse, Not Better, Patient Outcomes

    Surprisingly, patients who isolate before surgery to protect themselves from COVID-19 actually have a higher risk of lung complications after their operation than those who don't isolate, a new study reports.

    The findings conflict with current guidelines that recommend isolation before surgery, researchers noted.

    "Our evidence suggests that removing preoperative isolation strategies...

    New Drug Might Be Non-Surgical Option for Common Skin Cancers

    An experimental gel has shown early promise in treating the most common form of skin cancer -- hinting at a potential alternative to surgery in the future.

    Researchers tested the gel in 30 patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), a skin cancer diagnosed in more than 3 million Americans each year. The tumors rarely spread and are highly curable, usually through surgical removal.

    Eve...

    White Men's Grip on U.S. Health Care May Be Slipping

    The U.S. medical field is less dominated by white men than it used to be, but there are still few Black and Hispanic doctors, dentists and pharmacists, a new study finds.

    The study, which looked at trends over the past 20 years, found that white men no longer make up the majority of physicians and surgeons in the United States.

    By 2019, they accounted for about 44% of those position...

    One-Dose Blood Thinner Could Slash Blood Clot Risk After Knee Replacement

    Anyone who's ever undergone knee replacement understands the real and troubling risk of post-op blood clots. Many patients are told take a daily blood thinner pill long after their procedure.

    But a new study finds that a one-time injection of an experimental blood thinner called abelacimab may greatly reduce the odds for these clots in recovering knee replacement patients.

    The rese...

    Pope Leaves Hospital 10 Days After Colon Surgery

    Ten days after surgery to remove half of his colon, Pope Francis has been discharged from a Rome hospital.

    The Associated Press reported that a car carrying Francis, 84, left Rome's Gemelli Polytechnic hospital and traveled to the Vatican on Wednesday morning.

    After being diagnosed with diverticular stenosis, a severe narrowing of the large intestine, half of the pope's col...

    Black Men Less Likely to Get Best Prostate Cancer Treatments

    Black American military veterans with aggressive prostate cancer who would benefit from surgery or radiation are less likely to get those treatments than men of other races, despite equal access to health care, a new study finds.

    "Despite great strides in prostate cancer care over the past few decades, racial disparities in care persist, and there remains a lot to be done to better unders...

    Clot-Removing Procedure Can Sometimes Backfire for Stroke Patients

    When someone suffers a stroke, doctors can often remove the culprit clot obstructing blood flow to the brain. Now, a new study sheds light on why those successful procedures do not always translate into a good outcome.

    Researchers found that when clot retrieval takes more than one attempt, stroke patients are more likely to still have some degree of disability three months later.

    An...

    People Over 80 Benefit From Surgery for Benign Brain Tumors

    Surgery for the most common type of benign brain tumor should be considered for patients 80 and older, Finnish researchers say.

    Meningiomas originate in the meninges surrounding the brain, and the primary treatment is surgery. But the risks of operating increase with age, so surgery for meningioma patients who are 80 and older is rare in most countries, according to University of Helsinki...

    Alligator Attack Nearly Cost This Firefighter Dad His Arm

    You might not believe it, but Florida firefighter Carsten Kieffer was incredibly lucky when a 12-foot alligator leapt into his boat and chomped down on his right forearm.

    Just about no one else thought so, and that went double for Kieffer: Both main bones in his arm were broken, and a big bite had been taken out of the back of his forearm. After the attack, the arm essentially dangled fro...

    Red Cross Warns of Severe Blood Shortage

    There's a severe blood shortage in the United States due to a recent surge in trauma cases, organ transplants and elective surgeries, the American Red Cross says.

    The Red Cross is appealing to Americans to roll up their sleeves and donate blood immediately.

    "Our teams are working around the clock to meet the extraordinary blood needs of hospitals and patients -- distributing about 7...

    Many U.S. Seniors May Need Better Knee Arthritis Care

    Just a fraction of older Americans with arthritic knees try physical therapy, pain-relieving injections or other more conservative measures before undergoing knee replacement surgery, new research shows.

    And this may be driven by what type of doctor they see to treat their achy knees, as well as where they live, the study findings suggest.

    Knee osteoarthritis occurs when the cartila...

    Cataracts: Common, and Easy to Treat

    Many aging Americans can have their vision dimmed by cataracts, but the good news is that they're easily treated, one expert says.

    By age 80, half of Americans either have cataracts or have had surgery to remove them, according to Dr. Waid Blackstone, an ophthalmologist at University of Alabama at Birmingham Callahan Eye Hospital Clinic at Pell City.

    "In terms of the typical age-rel...

    Old Age No Bar to Successful Heart Transplant, Study Finds

    People over 70 are far less likely to be considered for or to receive a new heart -- even though new research suggests their survival rates after transplant are similar to those of younger patients.

    For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 57,000 adults (aged 18 and older) listed as heart transplant surgery candidates in the United States between January 2000 and August 2...

    Can You Keep Your Bladder After Bladder Cancer Strikes?

    After being diagnosed with bladder cancer, some patients face an almost impossible decision -- have their bladder removed or take a risk knowing that the cancer may be more likely to spread if the bladder is left intact.

    But what if there was another way?

    For David Cabelis, 68, the decision was more straightforward than most, as he had a unique opportunity to take part in a clinical...

    Don't Delay Lung Cancer Surgery, Study Suggests

    Surgery soon after a diagnosis of early-stage lung cancer is crucial in reducing the risk of recurrence and death, a new study finds.

    "Patients with early-stage cancer have the best chance for survival," said senior author Dr. Varun Puri, a thoracic surgeon and professor of surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "That's why it's critical for patients to promptly...

    Many Pre-Surgery Tests Are Useless, So Why Are Hospitals Still Using Them?

    Patients facing relatively simple outpatient surgeries are nonetheless being told to undergo a number of preoperative tests that just aren't necessary, a new study reports.

    More than half of a group of patients facing low-risk outpatient surgery received one or more tests -- blood work, urinalysis, an electrocardiogram (EKG), a chest X-ray -- prior to their operation.

    One-third of p...