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School Lockdown Drills Help Students Feel Safer: Study

Lockdown drills have become a shudder-inducing part of American life, preparing kids to lie low and keep quiet if a gunman chooses to roam their school.

But a new study finds these drills help children who’ve been exposed to violence, helping them feel safer at school.

The findings contradict claims that drills traumatize children rather than making them feel secure, researchers s...

This Election Year, Health Care Costs Top Voter Concerns: Poll

Unexpected medical bills and high health care costs are dominating an election where kitchen table economic problems weigh heavily on voter's minds, a new KFF poll has found.

Voters struggling to pay their monthly bills are most eager to hear presidential candidates talk about economic and health care issues, according to the latest KFF Health Tracking Poll.

Nearly three in four adu...

Political Changes Are Stressing Hispanic Americans: Study

Immigration has become a contentious topic in America, but new research shows the heated debate on the issue may be stressing out Hispanics across the country, whether they are citizens or not.

After analyzing data from 2011-2018, the researchers discovered that, over time, there has an increase in psychological distress among all Hispanics as U.S. immigration policies came under fire.

Stress, Lack of Child Care Driving Many Doctors to Quit

Doctors are bailing on the profession for a reason that may surprise their patients.

It's not frustration with government rules or cumbersome insurance requirements, but problems securing suitable childcare for long and ever-changing working hours, a new survey published Feb. 15 in the BMJ finds.

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 15, 2024
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  • Stress Main Factor Driving Teens to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol

    American teenagers cite stress as the leading reason they might get drunk or high, a new report reveals.

    That only underscores the need for better adolescent mental health care, according to the research team behind the study.

    Better "access to treatment and support for mental health concerns and stress could reduce some of the reported motivations for substance use," concluded inve...

    During Grief and Loss, Simple Steps Can Help You Cope

    Filling the day with simple activities could be the key to improving mood and well-being after a person has suffered the loss of a loved one, a new study finds.

    These “uplifts” -- activities that can improve a person's mood -- helped ease grief on a day-to-day basis, researchers reported recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 9, 2024
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  • Even Mild Cases of COVID Can Leave Lingering Insomnia

    Even mild cases of COVID can trigger insomnia in most people, a new study reports.

    About three out of four people with mild COVID (76%) reported experiencing insomnia following their illness.

    Further, nearly one in four (23%) said they'd experienced severe insomnia, according to results published Feb. 5 in the journal Frontiers in Public Health.

    If you experience insomnia afte...

    Cost, Job Worries Have Many Americans Postponing Surgeries

    Older adults frequently delay needed surgery because of financial concerns, a new study finds.

    Nearly half of people ages 50 and older who were very concerned about the cost of surgery wound up not having an operation they had considered, researchers reported Jan. 30 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

    Further, more than half who were very concerned about taking time off work...

    Stressed Teens at Risk of Heart Trouble Years Later

    Stressed-out teens are likely to have more heart health risk factors in adulthood, a new study says.

    Teens with elevated stress levels tended to have high blood pressure, obesity and other heart risk factors as they aged, compared to those teens with less stress, researchers found.

    “Our findings suggest that perceived stress patterns over time have a far-reaching effect on various...

    The 'Most Wonderful' Time? Maybe Not, Say Holiday-Stressed Americans

    What's even more nerve-wracking than paying taxes?

    The holidays, according to a majority of Americans, who say it takes them weeks to recover from seasonal stress.

    "The holidays are an easy time to justify putting off healthy habits, but it's important to manage chronic stress and other risk factors to stay healthy during the holiday season and into the New Year," said

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 20, 2023
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  • Trim Your Holiday Stress This Season: Experts Offer Tips

    SATURDAY, Dec. 2, 2023 (Healthday News) -- The holidays are typically a happy whirlwind of gift-buying, house decorating, party planning and family gatherings, but all that work can also stress people out.

    Luckily, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center say there are things you can do to keep your stress levels under control and help make your holidays happy.

    “Excess stress wea...

    Holiday Travel Sends Stress Levels Sky High: Here's Tips to Cope

    TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2023 (HealthDay News) --Traffic, crowds and unforeseen delays and disruptions can turn holiday travel from celebratory to chaos in a flash -- especially if you're prone to anxiety.

    Being aware of your triggers can help you be ready for any glitches that arise.

    "Triggers might include uncertainty of traffic, flight delays, being in public places, or seeing friends a...

    'Tis the Season to Be Stressed, New Poll Finds

    The song says 'tis the season to be jolly, but many Americans find it to be more the season of stress and worry, a new survey reports.

    The strain of inflation and world affairs this year are adding to the other holiday-time stressors to create a toxic mental health cocktail, according to findings from Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine.

    Survey resu...

    People's Heart Health Improves in More 'Flexible' Workplaces

    A kinder, more thoughtful workplace can lead to better heart health among older employees, a new study finds.

    Older workers' heart health risk factors decreased significantly when their office employed interventions designed to reduce work-family conflicts, researchers report in the Nov. 8 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

    Specifically, their heart risk factor...

    Teens Are Quitting Sports as Social Media Ups Body Image Concerns

    Kids who get discouraged by idealized athletic bodies on social media may end up dropping out of sports, a small study suggests.

    In a preliminary study of 70 kids who played -- or used to play -- sports, researchers found that some had quit because they thought they didn't have the "right" body for the activity. And most got that idea from media images, including TikTok and Instagram post...

    Are Trigger Warnings Useless? New Study Says Yes

    "Trigger warnings" are now widely accepted as away to help people avoid harm from disturbing content. Trouble is, they just don't work, according to new research.

    Trigger warnings seem like an obvious good: They alert people that a book, video or other media will depict a fraught topic such as sexual assault, abuse or suicide.

    Forewarned, consumers can skip the content or a...

    For the Young, Vaping & Chronic Stress Often Go Together

    Young people who vape are more likely to experience chronic stress, though it isn't clear whether it was the stress that brought on the vaping or the vaping that caused the stress, investigators say.

    “Research is starting to show how vaping affects young people's physical and mental health," said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 12, 2023
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  • More Stress, Higher Odds for A-Fib in Women After Menopause

    Postmenopausal women who are stressed, depressed or have trouble sleeping may face an increased risk of a common heart rhythm disorder, new research suggests.

    The study, of nearly 84,000 women over the age of 50, found that certain psychological factors were linked to the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, or a-fib -- a heart arrhythmia that can cause serious problems over time.

    ...

    As Kids Head Back to School, New Survey Finds 71% Faced Challenges Last Year

    As kids prepare to return to school, a new poll warns that the many children who found the last school year challenging are likely to be apprehensive this time around.

    The online survey, conducted by the Harris Poll on behalf of the nonprofit On Our Sleeves Movement for Children's Mental Health, found that 71% of American parents say their children experienced challenges last school year....

    A Little Drinking Might Help the Heart, and Scientists Think They Know Why

    Many studies have suggested that light drinking can do the heart some good, and now researchers think they have found one reason why: It helps the brain relax.

    It's no secret that many people pour a drink as a way to unwind and shed the stressors of the day. And research suggests that is not just a placebo effect. In the short term, alcohol has a quieting effect on the amygdala -- a brain...

    Inflation Is Really Stressing Americans Out

    The high cost of -- everything: Rising inflation rates are ramping up anxieties among some groups of Americans much more than others, a new study reports.

    Women, middle-age adults and people with less education or lower pay are feeling much more stress over higher prices, as well as people who were previously married but are now widowed, divorced or separated, according to findings publi...

    Discrimination at Work Could Raise Blood Pressure

    Dealing with discrimination at work -- from bosses or coworkers -- may be enough to send your blood pressure through the roof, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among more than 1,200 U.S. workers, those who felt they often faced on-the-job discrimination were 54% more likely to develop high blood pressure, versus workers with little exposure to such bias.

    Over eight year...

    How to Relieve a Stress Headache

    You had a rough day at work and got stuck in traffic on the way home, and suddenly your head starts pounding.

    Stress headaches can be debilitating in the moment, but you don't have to suffer indefinitely.

    If you're struggling with stress, you're not alone. More than one-quarter of adults in the United States reported they're too stressed out...

    Disconnecting From Work in Off-Hours Can Make You a Better Manager

    Striking a better work-life balance might make you a more effective manager on the job, according to a new study.

    A survey of managers and their employees found that bosses who could shut off after-work emails, calls and job-related stress had greater success guiding underlings to meet work goals.

    “We found that when leaders psychologically detached from work when at home -- they ...

    Stress Rash: What Is It and How to Treat It

    We know that stress can take a toll on the body, but many may not realize it can produce a rash.

    “Stress can increase the level of the hormone cortisol, increasing inflammation in your body, which can lead to hives, acne, eczema, and hair loss, among other symptoms," dermatologist Dr. Elizabeth Farhat said in...

    Burnout Levels High Among U.S. Health Care Workers

    Cafeteria workers. Receptionists. Pharmacists. Janitors. Administrators. Physical therapists.

    Much has been made of burnout among doctors and nurses, but a new survey has found high rates of work fatigue in nearly every type of job associated with health care.

    Physicians, nurses, clinical staff and non-clinical support workers in health care all are experiencing substantial levels o...

    Healthy Relationships Could Bring Healthier Bodies, Study Shows

    Close relationships -- and whether your experiences within those relationships are positive or negative -- could influence your physical health.

    New research found that the way you feel about your close relationships may affect the way your body functions.

    “Both positive and negative experiences in our relationships contribute to our daily stress, coping and physiology, like blood...

    Dealing With Caregiver Stress & Burnout: A Guide

    If you've been suffering from caregiver stress, you've got plenty of company.

    It affects about 36% of the 53 million unpaid family caregivers in the United States, according to a recent report by the AARP and the National Alliance for Car...

    Why Do I Sleep So Much? Reasons for Oversleeping

    Your eyes close and your mind shuts down the second your head hits the pillow, but you wake up 10 hours later still feeling tired.

    Many people complain about sleeping too little, but some struggle with the opposite problem: oversleeping.

    Oversleeping, or hypersomnia, is a sleep disorder characterized by complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness occurring regularly or often, ev...

    Parks, Rivers, Lakes: Nature's Great Stress Relievers

    Living closer to outdoor spaces and natural water may be better for your mental health, researchers say.

    A new study finds that close proximity to nature may reduce an older person's risk for serious psychological distress. That distress can lead to mild impairment of thinking and memory, as well as dementia.

    The study is scheduled for presentation at a meeting of the American Acade...

    Political News Takes Mental Toll, But Is Disengaging the Answer?

    In today's highly polarized political environment, is it possible to stay up-to-date with the news of the day without getting totally stressed out?

    If not, is there a way to limit the emotional and physical fallout? Or is all that individual stress in service of a greater societal good?

    New research paints a complex picture with no easy answers.

    On the one hand, paying cl...

    Gig Economy Could Be Harming Workers' Health

    Capitalism is thought to bring out the best in workers, but there's a dark side to tying a person's everyday efforts to their weekly paycheck.

    Folks relying on short-term, freelanced office jobs, or jobs where pay is linked to hustle -- depending largely on tips, commissions and bonuses -- may often suffer poor health related to their financial insecurity, new research has shown.

    Em...

    Doctor's Office Stress Test Could Gauge Your Heart Risk

    Evaluating a person's psychological stress can be a good way to gauge their risk of heart and blood vessel disease, new research suggests.

    And a brief questionnaire could help with the assessment, the study findings showed.

    “Our study is part of the accumulating evidence that psychological distress is a really important factor in a cardiovascular diagnosis, such as the other healt...

    Alcohol-Linked Deaths Soared During Pandemic, CDC Says

    Deaths caused by alcohol skyrocketed in the United States between 2019 and 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold, according to a just-published government report.

    The alcohol-induced death rate jumped 26% during that period, claiming more than 49,000 lives, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported...

    Stress + Air Pollution a Bad Combo in Pregnancy: Study

    Protecting pregnant women from air pollution may improve the birth weight of their babies, a new study suggests.

    This is especially important for stressed-out mothers who live in neighborhoods burdened by poor air quality.

    A mother-to-be's exposure to both

    Stress-Relief Programs Often Rely on Dogs. What About Cats?

    Universities sometimes offer "Pet Your Stress Away" events offering a chance to relax while gently patting the head and stroking the back of a calm dog.

    But some people are more interested in interacting with cats than dogs, according to a new study that linked preference to personality type.

    Lifetime of Stress Tied to Big Rise in Cancer Risk

    Over time, men and women under chronic stress face a significantly higher risk that they will die as a result of cancer, a new study warns.

    The finding comes from an analysis of more than three decades of U.S. data from a federal health and nutrition survey.

    After adjusting f...

    Perceptive Pooches Can Smell Your Stress

    Everyone knows dogs have a keen sense of smell, but now researchers have discovered they can even smell stress in the breath and sweat of humans.

    "Dogs possess an incredible sense of smell. Previous research has demonstrated their ability to detect changes within the human body from odor alone, such as ou...

    Stress Before COVID Infection Could Raise Odds for Long COVID

    As scientists around the world investigate why long COVID strikes some and not others, a new study finds that suffering psychological distress prior to COVID-19 infection may increase the chances of getting the lingering condition.

    Resea...

    Women Exposed to Racism at Higher Odds for Premature Delivery

    Numerous studies have found discrimination can hurt aspects of human health.

    Now, new research adds to that the impact of discrimination on the youngest humans by linking discrimination with a heightened risk of underweight and premature infants.

    Maternal death rates amo...

    There's Stress, and Then There's 'Good Stress'

    A tight deadline at work. A tough exam at school. A big vacation that requires tons of planning. A home repair that's gone awry.

    These sources of stress are anything but pleasant, but a new study suggests that they might actually be good f...

    Panting Pooches: When Summer Heat Is Too Much for Your Dog

    Summer is a great time to enjoy the outdoors with your dog, but when the temperatures spike or the fireworks come out, it's time to make sure your furry best friend is having just as good a time as you are.

    When a heat wave rolls in, try to only take your dog for walks in the coolest hours of the day, advised Mark Fr...

    Gardening Can Blossom Into Better Mental Health

    If you are feeling stressed and depressed, new research suggests that grabbing a trowel and getting your hands dirty may improve your mood.

    Researchers found that tending to plants can reap mental health benefits, even for first-time gardeners. The activity was linked to decreased stress, anxiety and depression in h...

    Are Workplace Robots Bringing Mental Harm to U.S. Workers?

    It takes much less than a "Matrix" plot to make American workers afraid for their jobs: New research reveals they stress out when they have to work alongside robots.

    Even though many robots took on the most dangero...

    Inflation Has Americans' Anxiety Levels Surging: Poll

    Nearly all Americans are worried about inflation as economic worries oust COVID-19 as the nation's top source of stress, a new poll reveals.

    Nearly nine out of 10 Americans (87%) said they are anxious or very anxious about inflation, up 8 percentage points from the previous month, according to...

    Poll Finds Many Diabetes Caregivers Exhausted, Lacking Support

    Diane Kondyra knows a lot about the hidden dangers of diabetes.

    Both she and her husband have been diagnosed with the blood sugar disease, and her husband suffered one of its devastating complications in 2018 when he developed a staph infection that cost him part of his leg. Uncontrolled diabetes can restrict blood flow to the legs, making it more likely that simple cuts can turn int...

    Muting Your Phone May Cause More Stress, Not Less

    Are you plagued by FOMO -- "fear of missing out"? Then silencing your smartphone may not be the stress-buster you think it is.

    That's the takeaway from a new study that found many folks check their phones a lot more when they're set to mute or vibrate than when they beep and ring.

    "Without any clear 'buzz' or sou...

    Pets Help Their Humans De-Stress, Stay Fit: Survey

    While chronic stress is a key risk factor for heart disease and stroke, most cat and dog owners say pets help them chill out and stay active.

    A new American Heart Association (AHA) survey of 1,000 pet owners found 95% relying on their animal companions for stress relief. About 7 in 10 said they'd rather spend time with their pet than watch television, and nearly half (47%) said their pets...

    Ageism Is Everywhere and Can Harm Health

    In a cancel culture where there's zero tolerance for prejudice, at least one form of discrimination appears to be alive and well.

    Ageism involves prejudice based on people's advancing age. It can be as overt as not hiring someone because they are older, or as subtle as giving a loved one a...

    How Grief Harms the Body After a Spouse's Death

    Heartache and heartbreak are apt terms for the intense grief caused by losing a spouse.

    A new study says such a loss can lead to major health problems and even death, and the paper may help explain why that happens.

    When faced with stressful situations, grieving spouses have significant increases in

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