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One-Third of Lung Cancer Patients Battle Depression: Study

MONDAY, Dec. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is common among lung cancer patients and can damage their quality of life and treatment outcomes, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that doctors should screen lung cancer patients for depression and refer them for mental health care if necessary, said lead author Barbara Andersen, a professor of psychology at Ohio State Uni...

HIV Testing, Treatment Not Reaching Many Americans

TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too few Americans are getting tested or treated for HIV, a new government report shows.

"The time is now to end HIV in America. We have the right tools, the right data and the right leadership to get this done," said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Those living with HIV are our b...

Self-Testing for Cervical Cancer Increases Screening Rates

FRIDAY, Nov. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mailing self-sampling kits to test for the cervical cancer-causing virus HPV significantly increased screening rates for the cancer, according to a new study.

The research included nearly 20,000 women in the Kaiser Permanente Washington (state) system who hadn't been screened for cervical cancer in more than three years.

About half go...

Screening  Truckers for Sleep Apnea Cuts Health Insurance Costs

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Requiring drivers to get treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) saved a trucking company a large amount in insurance costs for other health conditions, a new study shows.

People with apnea repeatedly stop breathing and wake partially during the night, resulting in poor sleep that can worsen other medical conditions.

Researcher...

Could a Blood Test for Breast Cancer Become a Reality?

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's early promise in the quest for a blood test that might spot breast cancer up to five years before clinical signs of the disease appear, researchers say.

The test identifies specific immune system "autoantibodies," British researchers explained. The immune system produces the antibodies when it comes into contact with tumor-associated an...

Women With More Aggressive Breast Cancer Face Higher Risk of Other Cancers

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women diagnosed with breast cancer between two routine screenings have an increased risk for other types of cancer, a new study finds.

Breast cancer detected between two routine screenings is called interval cancer, and it tends to be more advanced, more aggressive and to have a worse prognosis than cancers found during screenings.

...

Your Noisy Knees May Be Trying to Tell You Something

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ever hear your joints clicking, creaking or crunching? Now, researchers say a new technique that listens closely to knees may help doctors diagnose and monitor osteoarthritis.

In the new study, researchers attached small microphones to participants' knees, which allowed them to listen for high-frequency sounds as the person repeatedly stood ...

Give Seniors a Memory Check at Annual Checkups, Experts Say

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many older people show evidence of mental decline, called mild cognitive impairment, but doctors often miss this sometimes early sign of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

To help doctors get a better handle on their patients' mental state, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is urging physicians to assess patients aged 65 and older at lea...

At-Risk Men May Also Benefit From Regular Mammograms

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography has saved hundreds of thousands of lives by detecting breast cancer early in women.

Could such regular X-ray screening also help men?

A new study argues there's potential benefit in regular mammograms for men who are at high risk of breast cancer.

Mammography accurately detected dozens of cases of breast cancer in n...

Where Women's Health Clinics Close, Cervical Cancer Outcomes Worsen

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As government funding dried up and many women's health clinics across America closed, cervical cancer screening rates fell and deaths from the disease rose, a new report shows.

Nearly 100 women's health clinics in the United States closed between 2010 and 2013, researchers said -- often due to the passage of more restrictive laws or the loss ...

Lung Cancer Screening Can Detect Other Smoking Ills

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- CT lung cancer screening can detect other serious smoking-related conditions, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and emphysema, researchers say.

Medical experts consider lung cancer screening an effective way to detect malignant tumors at earlier, more treatable stages. Now, new research suggests low-dose CT scans of the lungs could also i...

What Is Your Risk for Prostate Cancer?

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men, so it's important to know the risk factors and warning signs, an expert says.

The American Cancer Society estimates there will be nearly 175,000 new prostate cancer cases in the United States this year and over 31,000 deaths. One in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate ca...

Can Older Women Stop Getting Mammograms?

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although regular screening mammograms can catch breast cancer early, new research suggests women over 75 who have chronic illnesses can probably skip this test.

The study findings indicate that women with chronic conditions, such as heart disease or diabetes, would likely die from those conditions before developing breast cancer.

"...

How to Get Your College Years Off to a Healthy Start

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A wellness checklist to help the 20 million new students starting at U.S. colleges this fall is available from Ohio State University experts.

Checklist topics include exercise, healthy eating, stress management, organization, and mental and physical health. The checklist also outlines resources students should pinpoint when they arrive on camp...

Study Points to Harms From MRI 'Dye' in Early Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A concerning number of U.S. women are exposed to the MRI contrast agent gadolinium early in pregnancy, a new study reveals.

In many cases, this exposure occurs before women know they're pregnant.

The researchers said their findings underscore the need for effective pregnancy screening measures before using gadolinium, which can cros...

U.S. Task Force Updates Breast Cancer Gene Testing Recommendations

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in two genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- are known to significantly increase the risk of breast cancer, but experts have long debated which women should be tested for them.

New recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) may help clarify who can benefit most from a risk assessment test. Now, if a woman has a hig...

Pure CBD Won't Make You Fail a Drug Test, But…

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the CBD craze sweeps the nation, some users may wonder whether the cannabis extract can make them fail a drug test. A preliminary study suggests the answer is "no" -- at least if the CBD is pure.

Researchers found that CBD, or cannabidiol, did not react with either of two commercially available tests used to screen for marijuana use. However...

Are You Still Putting Off Colon Cancer Screening?

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- No one looks forward to a colonoscopy, but it can save your life. So you might be wondering whether a home test is a good alternative.

These tests involve mailing a stool sample to a lab. Older types of tests check for blood, which could signal a cancerous growth. Precancerous polyps are harder to find with these tests, because they tend not to...

New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link ...

Despite Cancer Screening, 'Oldest Old' Have Low Survival Odds: Study

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The oldest Americans have higher cancer screening rates but lower cancer survival rates than younger seniors, a new report shows.

Those 85 and older -- a group dubbed the oldest old -- are also less likely to have cancer surgery than their counterparts between 65 and 84 years of age.

Adults aged 85 and up are the fastest-growing ag...

Routine Screening for Pancreatic Cancer Not Warranted, Expert Panel Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's nothing to be gained by screening for pancreatic cancer in people with no signs or symptoms of the lethal tumor, according to an influential U.S. panel of experts.

Looking over the accumulated data on the subject, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on Tuesday reaffirmed its prior recommendation against routine screening f...

Extreme Eating Habits Could Be an Early Clue to Autism

TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of kids are picky eaters. But when eating habits in young children are extreme, it could be a sign of autism, researchers say.

A new study finds atypical eating behaviors -- such as hypersensitivity to food textures or pocketing food without swallowing -- in 70% of kids with autism. That's 15 times the rate typically found in childre...

Newer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More Lives

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A newer form of lung cancer screening may mean fewer deaths from the disease, a new study contends.

Using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) instead of X-rays helped reduce lung cancer deaths in current and former smokers, the study authors said.

"Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and early detection and t...

Concussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football Player

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Certain high school and college athletes require a longer-than-normal recovery period after a concussion. Researchers say blood tests can predict which ones.

"With so many people sustaining concussions and a sizable number of them having prolonged symptoms and recovery, any tools we can develop to help determine who would be at greater risk ...

Low Vitamin D at Birth Linked to Kids' High Blood Pressure Risk

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Infants and young children with vitamin D deficiency may have a heightened risk for elevated blood pressure later in childhood and in their teens, a new study finds.

Researchers followed 775 children in Boston from birth to age 18. Most were from low-income families in urban neighborhoods.

Compared to children born with normal vitami...

New Urine Test Might Show Whether Prostate Cancer Needs Treatment

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A man who learns he has prostate cancer faces a difficult choice: whether to immediately treat the cancer despite potential side effects or wait and see if it's a slow-growing tumor that never needs treatment.

Men may soon have help making that decision.

Researchers from the United Kingdom report that they've created a urine tes...

Making Sense of Mammography Guidelines

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Experts agree that detecting breast cancer early offers a better outlook, but when to start screenings and how often to have them has changed repeatedly.

The goal has been to balance early detection with the distress of false positives that lead to unnecessary testing. But leading medical organizations differ regarding the guidelines, making...

Could 3-D Mammograms Soon Be the Standard for Breast Cancer Screening?

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More women are getting 3-D mammograms, which spot breast anomalies more accurately than traditional mammograms, a new study shows.

But there are big variations in use across the United States, the researchers noted.

Three-D mammography -- also called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) -- combines low-dose X-rays with software that cr...

No Needle Prick: Laser-Based Test Hunts Stray Melanoma Cells in Blood

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring a melanoma patient's progress is challenging. But a laser-based test might allow doctors to quickly screen the patient's blood to spot tumor cells roaming the body, a preliminary study suggests.

Those cells, known as circulating tumor cells, are "shed" from the original cancer site into the blood vessels or lymph system. They are...

Is MRI Screening Worth It for Breast Cancer Survivors?

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breast MRI screening is a good way to detect small tumors, but it's unclear how much it benefits women with a history of breast cancer, a new study finds.

Right now, experts recommend that breast cancer survivors have yearly mammograms to help catch any recurrences early. An unresolved question is whether adding breast MRI to that screening is...

Blood Test Could Spot Multiple Cancer Types, Researchers Say

WEDNESDAY, May 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A gene-based blood test can accurately detect breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, gastric or bile duct cancers in patients, researchers report.

The test uses artificial intelligence to identify and interpret "fragments" of DNA in the blood that indicate the presence of cancer, explained researchers led by Dr. Victor Velculescu. He...

Blood Banks Could Help Screen for Hereditary High Cholesterol

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1 million Americans have a genetic condition that pushes their cholesterol to dangerously high levels, but many don't know it.

Now, researchers offer a possible way to get more people with so-called familial hypercholesterolemia into treatment for this potentially life-threatening problem.

"The blood donor system could be...

Young, and Learning Too Late That Sun Safety Matters

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game.

"I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor.

Within days, Langill was diagnosed with stage ...

Is AI a New Weapon in Breast Cancer Detection?

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence is the hot new trend in medicine, and now new research suggests it could help doctors better predict a woman's breast cancer risk.

The study is the latest to explore the potential role of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine.

Typically, it works like this: Researchers develop an algorithm using "deep learni...

Use of Meds for Enlarged Prostate Might Delay a Cancer Diagnosis

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Men who take medicines for an enlarged prostate can have years-long delays in their diagnosis of prostate cancer and more advanced prostate cancer when they're diagnosed, a new study finds.

The reason? Drugs in this class -- such as Proscar (finasteride) and Avodart (dutasteride) -- can drive down blood levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)....

The Surprising Lead Cause of Death for Pregnant Women

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A major medical group has issued new guidance on detecting and treating the leading cause of death in pregnant women and new mothers in the United States.

Heart disease accounts for 26.5% of pregnancy-related deaths, and rates are highest among black women and those with low incomes. On Friday, the American College of Obstetricians and Gyne...

Developmental Tests Might Spot Autism at Even Younger Ages

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a child with autism is diagnosed, the better, and now new research describes a novel way of catching it earlier than ever.

Well-child visits that include developmental screening might pick up the first hints of autism risk in some children, the study suggests.

"We think this has the potential to identify children at risk fo...

Not All Cervical Cancer Rates Are Declining

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A type of cervical cancer that's less sensitive to Pap testing is increasing among white women in the United States, new research shows.

An overall decline in cervical cancer rates in recent decades has been driven by decreases in squamous cell carcinomas. Most of the rest of cervical cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which are less likely t...

Quick Test Helps Predict Hospital Readmission Risk After Heart Attack

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly heart attack survivors, how well they perform on a simple mobility test could help predict whether they will be back in the hospital within a month, researchers say.

Nearly one in five of these heart patients are readmitted with complications such as heart failure, bleeding or irregular heart beat within 30 days after leaving the...

When Do Women Need a Mammogram? New Guideline Tries to Clarify

MONDAY, April 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A group representing U.S. family doctors issued updated mammography guidelines Monday, adding to an ongoing debate over how early and how often women should be screened.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) now recommends a mammogram every other year for women ages 50 to 74 who are at average risk for breast cancer and have no symptoms.

U.S. Leads World in Reducing Prostate Cancer Cases

TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of prostate cancer cases and deaths have declined or stabilized in many countries. And the United States had the largest recent decrease in disease incidence, a new study says.

"Previous studies have indicated significant variation in prostate cancer rates, due to factors including detection practices, availability of treatment, and gen...

FDA Says Breast Density Must Be Reported to Women During Mammograms

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women with dense breasts who get mammograms must be told of their higher risk for breast cancer under new rules proposed Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The FDA would also tighten its regulation of mammogram facilities, giving the agency the power to notify patients if problems are found at a center so that repeat mammo...

Choose the Right Colon Cancer Screening Option

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer is highly preventable through regular screening. But the right type of screening depends on your particular risk factors, an expert says.

Each year in the United States, more than 140,000 people are diagnosed with colon cancer, and about 50,000 die from the disease. It's the second-leading cause of cancer death in the country.

Affordable Care Act Brought Big Benefits to Women: Study

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More American women had health insurance and access to care after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was fully in place in 2014, and poorest women benefited most, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers examined U.S. National Health Interview Survey data on insurance affordability, access to care and the use of preventive services --...

Could the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?

FRIDAY, March 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- No one likes to get a colonoscopy, but new research suggests that mailing at-home colon cancer tests to folks who are overdue for their checks might prompt them to get screened.

"We believe that mailing kits directly to patients, which frames participation as the default, reduced steps in the screening process, making it easier for patients t...

Blood Test to Diagnose Heart Attacks May Not Be Foolproof

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test used to detect a heart attack may often provide some misleading results, British researchers report.

In a new study of patients undergoing blood tests at a hospital in England, one in 20 people had high blood levels of troponin, a protein released into the bloodstream during a heart attack. But most of them had no clinical sign...

AI Takes Aim at Lung Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The term artificial intelligence (AI) might bring to mind robots or self-driving cars. But one group of researchers is using a type of AI to improve lung cancer screening.

Screening is important for early diagnosis and improved survival odds, but the current lung cancer screening method has a 96 percent false positive rate.

But i...

NFL Players' Enlarged Hearts May Harm Health for Decades

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Athlete's heart" -- an enlarged heart created by intense physical training -- is a common and often brushed-off condition within elite and professional sports.

But a new study of National Football League players is raising concern about the long-term consequences of athlete's heart when it comes to retirees who have long left the field.

Too Few Seniors Are Getting Their Memory Tested

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most seniors expect their doctor to recommend testing of thinking and memory when it's needed.

But a new survey discovered that is rarely the case: Only one in seven seniors received a regular assessment for memory and thinking (or "cognitive") troubles.

That finding is in sharp contrast to those who receive assessments for other c...

Colon Cancer Usually Diagnosed Late in Under-50 Adults

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults are increasingly developing colon cancer -- and it's often diagnosed at a late stage, after they've seen several doctors and been misdiagnosed, a new survey shows.

Researchers questioned nearly 1,200 colon cancer patients diagnosed before age 50. Most cases were correctly identified only after the cancer was more advanced. In f...