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Health News Results - 159

Obesity and 'Spare Tire' Raise Hispanics' Odds for Early Death

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Excess weight, especially a "spare tire" around the middle, increases the risk of an earlier death for Hispanics, a large new study suggests.

The study found that for every 5 point increase in body mass index above 25, the risk of dying prematurely went up by 30%.

Body mass index (BMI) is an estimate of a person's fat levels ...

AHA News: Study Finds Racial Gap in Who Gets Critical Stroke Treatments

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Black and Hispanic people having a stroke are less likely than their white counterparts to get treatments proven to reduce death and improve quality of life, new research shows.

For strokes caused by a clot, the gold standard treatment is a clot-busting drug called alteplase, according to guidelines from the American Heart A...

High Blood Pressure Much More Deadly for the Poor

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure exacts a far greater toll on poor people than it does on affluent Americans, a new, national study finds.

The data from the clinical trial, which was designed to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), showed that poor people were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled over the course of six years. They...

Stress Takes Toll in Very Complicated Births

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A "dual burden" of serious maternal complications and premature birth occurs in about one in 270 births, a new study finds.

But hospital staff are often blind to the stress caused by this double whammy, researchers say.

"The situation of combined maternal and newborn complications is likely to be extremely stressful for families co...

Racial Disparity in Care Starts With Youngest, Frailest Patients

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many studies have uncovered racial gaps in health care in the United States, but now a new review confirms that the disparity begins at birth.

The review, of 41 studies, found that infants born to minority women typically received poorer care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) compared with white newborns.

The finding was oft...

Preterm Births to Hispanic Women Climbed After Trump's Election

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of preterm births to Hispanic women in the United States inched up shortly after the 2016 election -- raising the question of whether the political climate played a role, researchers say.

The study, of births between 2009 and 2017, found an uptick in preterm deliveries among Hispanic women that occurred in the nine months after Pres...

AHA News: Pregnancy Complications Could Be Early Sign of Heart Disease Risk in Black Women

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- A new study confirms that when it comes to assessing heart health, an important question a doctor can ask an African American woman is, "Did you have complications during a pregnancy?"

The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, analyzed data collected on...

CPR Less Likely for Black Kids in Poor Neighborhoods: Study

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest is rare in children. But a new study finds that if it does happen, kids are less likely to get life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they're black and living in a poor neighborhood.

In fact, these kids were much less likely to receive CPR from a bystander than white children living in any type of neighborhood, th...

When It Comes to Treating Infertility, Race, Education and Income Matter

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle with infertility, chances are you will be twice as likely to get treatment for the heartbreaking condition if you are white, college-educated or affluent.

So claims a new study that analyzed data from more than 2,500 women aged 20 to 44 who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2013 and ...

Suicide Rates Soaring Among Black Teens

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tragically, teens can be vulnerable to suicide as they navigate the emotional pitfalls of growing up, and a new U.S. study suggests black teens might be the most vulnerable of all.

Suicide deaths among black females aged 13 to 19 rose 182% between 2001 and 2017, while the rate among black teen males rose 60% during that same period....

More Than 5 Million U.S. Cancer Survivors Deal With Chronic Pain

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of U.S. cancer survivors have chronic pain, and 1 in 6 have levels that restrict their daily activities, a new study finds.

"The prevalence of chronic pain and high impact chronic pain among cancer survivors in our study was almost double that in the general population, suggesting there are important unmet needs in the large and gr...

Bones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at Bay

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Why do so many black adults continue to look youthful as they age?

A new study says it's in their bones.

Researchers found that the facial bones of black adults retain a higher mineral content than those other races, which makes their faces less likely to reflect their advancing years.

The new study is the first to docume...

Race Affects Life Expectancy in Major U.S. Cities

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fifty-six of America's 500 biggest cities have major gaps in life expectancy between neighborhoods, a new study reveals.

These gaps can mean people in one neighborhood live 20 to 30 years longer than those just a mile away -- and the inequalities are prevalent in cities with high levels of racial and ethnic segregation, according to New York U...

Obamacare May Have Helped Close 'Race Gap' in Cancer Care

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding Medicaid coverage after the Affordable Care Act seems to have narrowed U.S. racial differences in cancer treatment, a new study suggests.

Before the Affordable Care Act, blacks diagnosed with advanced cancer were 4.8 percentage points less likely than whites to get treatment within the month after diagnosis, the researchers said.

...

Aggressive Uterine Cancer on the Rise, Especially in Blacks: Study

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's been a steep uptick in aggressive uterine cancers among American women, especially black women, since 2000, a new study shows.

It also found that black women with these aggressive cancers have lower survival rates than other women.

Researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) analyzed data on uterine cancer among 3...

Who's Most Likely to Miss School Due to Eczema?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

...

'Watchful Waiting' Less Likely for Black Prostate Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Watchful waiting" is on the rise overall among U.S. men with low-risk prostate cancer, but black men remain less likely to opt for it, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined 2010-2015 data on more than 50,000 low-risk prostate cancer patients in the United States. The investigators found that black men were 16% less lik...

Lupus Takes Bigger Toll on Longevity for Blacks

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease that attacks the skin, joints and organs, can shorten the lives of its victims, but new research shows it can shorten the lives of black patients the most.

Health data from two counties in Georgia found that black people with lupus have an average age at death of about 52. Meanwhile, white people with the d...

Poor, Minorities Shortchanged on Opioid Addiction Treatments

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to opioid addiction treatments, money and race matter, researchers say.

White, wealthy Americans are much more likely to receive medication for their addiction than minorities and the poor, the new study found.

Racial and financial differences have only grown wider as the opioid crisis in the United States has worsene...

Many Pregnancy-Related Maternal Deaths Occur Months After Delivery: CDC

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women still die from pregnancy-related causes, some up to a year after delivery, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About 700 pregnancy-related deaths occur in the United States each year, and 3 out of 5 are preventable, data show.

Nearly 31% of the deaths happen during pregnan...

U.S. Heart Failure Rates Are Rising, Especially for Black Adults

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people are terrified of having a heart attack, but they might also need to worry about heart failure, particularly if they are black.

After years of decline and despite treatment advances, the risk of dying early from heart failure-related causes started increasing after 2012, new research shows. Black men seem especially hard hit by this ...

The Surprising Lead Cause of Death for Pregnant Women

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A major medical group has issued new guidance on detecting and treating the leading cause of death in pregnant women and new mothers in the United States.

Heart disease accounts for 26.5% of pregnancy-related deaths, and rates are highest among black women and those with low incomes. On Friday, the American College of Obstetricians and Gyne...

Black Women in the U.S. Still Missing Out on Heart Care

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Older black American women are much less likely to be treated for heart attack and heart disease than white and Hispanic women, researchers say.

"Our study shows that black women still receive less recommended therapy for heart attacks and coronary heart disease than white women, and that improving these racial disparities is still needed," sa...

Blacks Live Longer, Not Necessarily Better, With ALS

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) tend to live longer than whites with the disease because blacks are more likely to have a procedure called a tracheostomy, a new study shows.

But that may not always be a good thing, the researchers noted.

ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neurodegenerativ...

Ancestry Matters When Seeking Matched Bone Marrow Donors

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.

A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patient's cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with th...

AHA News: Stressful Life Events Tied to Heart Disease in Older Black Women

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Stressful life events were linked to higher incidents of heart attack, stroke and other types of cardiovascular disease in black women, according to new research that also looked at whether a person's resilience could help ward off the impact of stress.

The study did not find a connection between resilience and cardiovascu...

Race Affects Health Care of Even the Smallest and Youngest

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Racial segregation starts early in a child's life, with vulnerable black "preemies" receiving worse hospital care in the United States than white, Hispanic or Asian infants, a new investigation finds.

Researchers looked at segregation and the quality of care at more than 700 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), focusing on babies born very ...

Heart Risks Vary Among Asian-Americans

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not all Asian-Americans are equally susceptible to the deadly damage of heart disease and stroke, new research suggests.

The risk of premature death is highest among Asian Indian, Filipino and Vietnamese subgroups, the researchers found.

For the study, investigators analyzed U.S. death records from 2003 to 2012 to determine aver...

Burden of Autism in Teens Weighs Heaviest on Minorities, Poor

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Autism exacts a heavy toll on the families of teens who struggle with the disorder, but the fight to get treatment and services is even harder among minorities who live in poverty, new research suggests.

"We must understand that many families parenting teens on the autism spectrum are also struggling to make ends meet while trying to navigate...

AHA News: Black Woman in Their 50s Face Especially High Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Black women in their 50s may have more than triple the risk of stroke compared to white women of the same age, according to a new study that also found a healthy lifestyle could help curb much of that risk.

The findings suggest strokes are "impacting black women at a time in their lives when they're most productive at the...

Dementia May Strike Differently, Depending on Race

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia appears to strike people of different races in different ways, brain autopsies have revealed.

Hispanic and black people are more likely to suffer from dementia that's caused in part by micro-strokes or hardening of the arteries that serve the brain, researchers report.

On the other hand, whites are more likely to have deme...

Blacks, Hispanics Bear Burden of Air Pollution: Study

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution caused mainly by white Americans has the greatest impact on black and Hispanic Americans, a new study says.

"Similar to previous studies, we show that racial-ethnic minorities are exposed to more pollution on average than non-Hispanic whites," said lead author Christopher Tessum, a research scientist at the University of Washing...

Poor Asthma Control Tied to Worse School Performance

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with poorly controlled asthma struggle in school, especially those who are ethnic minorities, a new study reports.

Researchers evaluated asthma and allergy status, lung function and school performance of 216 black, Hispanic (Latino) and white children in a U.S. city.

Those with a greater number of daily asthma symptoms had more...

Many Black Americans Live in Trauma Care 'Deserts'

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black neighborhoods in America's three largest cities are much more likely to be located in a "trauma desert," an area without immediate access to a designated trauma center, a new study finds.

Census data for neighborhoods in New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles revealed that neighborhoods made up of mostly black residents are more often 5...

AHA News: Smoking Doubles Stroke Risk Among African-Americans

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- African-Americans who smoke cigarettes are twice as likely to have a stroke than those who avoid tobacco, according to new research.

Previous studies have shown that, overall, African-Americans between ages 45 and 64 have two to three times the risk of stroke compared to white people. But there has been little research on lin...

AHA News: Can Social Connection Aid Heart Health in African-American Community?

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- For black adults, connecting with neighbors could do much more than create a sense of community -- it also might be good for their heart.

A study presented this week at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions suggests black adults who interact re...

U.S. Deaths From Suicide, Substance Abuse Reach Record High

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Deaths from drugs, alcohol and suicide in the United States hit an all-time high in 2017 -- more than 150,000 in all.

That number was more than double 1999 levels, according to a chilling new analysis of U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data by the Trust for America's Health and Well Being Trust, two health policy organizations...

AHA News: Why Are Black Women at Higher Risk of Dying From Pregnancy Complications?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Serena Williams and Beyoncé are at the top of their professions. Williams is one of the best tennis players, and arguably athletes, of all time. Beyoncé is a singer who sells out arenas within hours.

But last year, they shared similar stories: Each experienced life-threatening complications in their pregnanci...

AHA News: Despite Socioeconomic Gains, Black-White 'Health Gap' Remains

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Boston pediatrician Dr. April Inniss has read the studies. She has reviewed the reports. She's spoken with colleagues. She has even done her own research.

Yet the information remains shocking to her, flying in the face of her medical training and even, seemingly, common sense: "Black women with a college education or great...

High Blood Pressure Hits Urban Blacks Harder

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are black and live in a city, you may be five times more likely to have extremely high blood pressure than the U.S. national average.

That's the conclusion of a study that analyzed the records of more than 3,500 patients with elevated blood pressure treated in the emergency department of Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in New Jersey, ...

AHA News: Post-Stroke Depression Common Among Black, Hispanic Survivors

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- For the nearly 800,000 people who experience a stroke each year in the United States, the aftereffects are likely to be life-changing.

Often, it's the long-term physical complications that get the most attention, problems ranging from temporary weakness or permanent paralysis to difficulty swallowing, talking or thinking.

...

State Prisons Need More Smoking-Cessation Programs: Study

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many inmates in U.S. state prisons who want to quit smoking have nowhere to turn for help, a new study finds.

That increases their risk of smoking-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease and stroke.

And the risk is especially high for black men, who are six times more likely to be imprisoned than non-Hispanic white men. The...

More Smoking, Heart Woes Boost Native Americans' Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke risk factors are on the rise among Native Americans, a new study reveals.

Previous research has shown that Native Americans have a higher rate of stroke than other racial groups in the United States.

"It was alarming to find a significant increase in modifiable risk factors, like smoking and high blood pressure," said study ...

Smoking Puts Blacks at High Risk of Serious Artery Disease: Study

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases black Americans' risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study warns.

PAD -- a narrowing of arteries that provide blood to the arms, legs, brain and other organs such as the kidneys -- can lead to stroke, kidney failure, erectile dysfunction, pain in the legs when walking and loss of limbs.

Black Americans a...

At Risk for Breast Cancer? Your Race Matters

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black women at risk of breast cancer may face a disadvantage because of racial disparities in health care, a small new study suggests.

Ohio State University researchers interviewed 30 white and 20 black women at high risk for breast cancer due to family history and other factors.

The investigators found that black women were less lik...

Money Woes May Take Toll on Black Americans' Hearts

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Money worries may contribute to heart disease in black Americans, a new study suggests.

"Stress is known to contribute to disease risk, but the data from our study suggest a possible relationship between financial stress and heart disease that clinicians should be aware of as we research and develop interventions to address social determinan...

Race May Matter for Liver Transplant Success

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans who receive a liver transplant to treat liver cancer may survive much longer if the new organ comes from a black donor, a new study suggests.

"Our data are intriguing. But our results require validation," said study author Dr. T. Clark Gamblin, chief of surgical oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

...

Vaccine, Screening Can Prevent Cervical Cancer Deaths

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 4,000 women in the United States die from cervical cancer each year -- even though there's a preventive vaccine and screening to catch the disease early.

"When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable," said Dr. Sarah Ramirez, a family medicine physician with Penn State Health. "So it's important to make sure you are being...

AHA: Why Do IVF Pregnancies With Frozen Embryos Raise Preeclampsia Risk?

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- For women who use in vitro fertilization to get pregnant, particularly those who find success with frozen embryo transfers, recent studies have found they have an increased risk of preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication and serious blood pressure condition.

Now, academic researchers may have uncovered why.

"Many have r...

AHA: New Cholesterol Guidelines Put Ethnicity in the Spotlight

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- As in most things, family matters. Specifically, your family's ethnicity could make a difference, at least when it comes to cholesterol and your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

In a recent update of cholesterol guidelines, a national panel of scientists and health experts stressed a more personalized approach to risk asse...