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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

27 Feb

Work Hours And Mental Health

Women who work extra-long hours face increased risk of depression.

14 Dec

Brain Teasers and Mental Decline

Do crossword puzzles and chess really help keep your memory sharp as you age?

Health News Results - 522

Four-Legged Friends Help Buffer Loss of a Spouse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of a loved one is one of life's most stressful events. But new research suggests that having a furry loved one still at home may help ease the pain.

Investigators looked at 437 older adults, some of whom lost a spouse, either through divorce or death. They found that having a cat or dog at home was linked to an easing of lonelin...

Age Often Dampens Narcissists' Self-Love, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Narcissism is not a good look at any age, but new research suggests it fades as people enter their 40s.

However, the degree of decline in narcissism varies between individuals and can be related to their career and relationships, the researchers added.

Overall, the "findings should bring comfort to those who are concerned that yo...

Are You Just a Worrywart or Is It Something More?

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone goes through moments of worry, but for some people, anxiety takes over their lives. How can you tell if you're an average worrywart or if you might have an anxiety disorder? Your degree of distress is often a good indicator.

Normal anxiety typically comes from a specific source of stress, like an upcoming job interview or a fight wi...

First Sexual Experience Was Forced for 1 in 16 U.S. Women

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Changes wrought by the #MeToo movement can't come soon enough, say researchers who found that for 1 in 16 U.S. women, their first sexual experience was forced.

"In a nationally representative sample of more than 13,000 women, 6.5% said their first sexual encounters was forced as opposed to voluntary," said the study's lead author, Dr...

More U.S. Teen Girls Are Victims of Suicide Than Thought, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The gender gap in teen suicide is smaller than previously estimated, with more girls dying by suicide each year, a new study contends.

Suicide death rates among 10- to 19-year-old girls have been systematically underestimated, while rates among boys have been overestimated, according to the report published Sept. 13 in JAMA Network Open....

What Fuels Your Appetite for Taking a Gamble?

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Variations in brain activity when a person is idle may affect their decisions about risky behavior, according to a new study.

The findings may help explain why people are inconsistent -- and sometimes irrational -- and could lead to new treatments for gambling addiction, the researchers said.

"Experts have long struggled to expla...

Lots of Time on Social Media Linked to Anxiety, Depression in Teens

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who spend more time with social media are more likely to suffer from social withdrawal, anxiety or depression, a new study says.

Twelve- to 15-year-olds who spent more than six hours a day on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social media were nearly three times more likely to have these types of "internalizing" mental health issu...

Dogs Help Injured Vets Cope

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A big floppy-faced St. Bernard saved the life of Army veteran and combat medic Brian Gliba -- but not in the way you might think.

Gliba first met Zeus in 2009 while battling post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dealing with the medical havoc wrought by an IED blast he survived in Iraq.

Zeus' main job was to help Gliba remember...

Don't Blame Technology for Young People's Mood Problems: Study

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Spending time on their phones or online doesn't harm teens' mental health, according to a new study that challenges a widely held belief.

"It may be time for adults to stop arguing over whether smartphones and social media are good or bad for teens' mental health and start figuring out ways to best support them in both their offline and onl...

Suicide Becoming All Too Common in U.S.

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide continues to become more common in the United States, with rural areas hit hardest by this ongoing crisis of despair, a new study reports.

Deprivation, isolation and lack of access to mental health care all appear to be driving the crisis in rural America, said lead researcher Danielle Steelesmith. She's a postdoctoral fellow at Ohio S...

Hurricanes Like Dorian Take Heavy Toll on Mental Health

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When severe storms or hurricanes like Dorian sweep through communities with high winds and flooding, they can leave more than physical damage in their wake.

New research suggests that dealing with the aftermath -- which can include a damaged home and property -- puts people at high risk for depression, anxiety and other mental health problem...

Posting All Those Selfies Online Could Backfire, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Posting selfies on social media won't do you any favors in terms of likability.

A small new study finds that many people take a dim view of others who post a lot of selfies on Instagram.

Researchers at Washington State University conducted an experiment to determine which posts lead to snap judgments about the user's personality. ...

Transgender 'Conversion Therapy' Common, Potentially Harmful

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than one in 10 transgender people say they've been pressured by a professional counselor to accept their birth sex.

So finds the largest survey to date on the issue.

Nearly 14% of transgender people say that some sort of professional -- a psychologist, counselor or religious advisor -- urged them to identify only with t...

Personality Reboots Are Possible, Studies Suggest

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you ever think that being more at ease at social and business functions could make you happier or possibly help you get ahead at work?

Your personality greatly influences your life because it influences so many aspects of your day-to-day world, from personal to business relationships, from your mental to your physical well-being.

...

What Treatments Work Best to Prevent Suicide?

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you or someone you love is thinking about suicide, a new review points to effective treatments that can reduce suicide risk.

Some involve therapy -- cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) -- while others involve medication, such as ketamine (by infusion) or lithium.

"People should be aware that ther...

Why ADHD Might Raise the Risk of Early Death

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Swedish researchers think they have honed in on why people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to die prematurely.

Accidental injuries, suicide and substance abuse all play a part, and psychiatric problems fuel these factors, a new study from the Karolinska Institute suggests.

To arrive at that concl...

Staying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study Shows

MONDAY, Aug. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us...

How to Get Your College Years Off to a Healthy Start

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A wellness checklist to help the 20 million new students starting at U.S. colleges this fall is available from Ohio State University experts.

Checklist topics include exercise, healthy eating, stress management, organization, and mental and physical health. The checklist also outlines resources students should pinpoint when they arrive on camp...

Restless Legs Syndrome Might Raise Risk of Suicide, Self-Harm

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) have nearly three times the risk of suicide and self-harm, which indicates that there may be a link between the physical condition and mental health.

In a new study, Penn State researchers analyzed data on more than 24,000 people with RLS and about 145,000 people without the neurological condition. None...

How Helpful Are Self-Help Programs?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's no shortage of self-help apps, videos and podcasts on topics from having better mental health to having a better six-pack.

Though the programs they offer bring the convenience of working at your own pace and in your own space, it's important that you evaluate any program on its merits before committing your time and energy. Also, r...

Could Dirty Air Spur a Rise in Serious Mental Illness?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As air quality declines, the prevalence of mental health conditions may rise, a large, new study suggests.

Looking at data on millions of people in the United States and Denmark, researchers found correlations between air pollution exposure and rates of certain psychiatric disorders. In both countries, poorer air quality was linked to a sligh...

City Parks Are a Mood Booster

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living in the city can be hard on the senses and the spirit, but spending some time in a tree-lined park could counteract that stress, new research suggests.

"Over a three-month period, we collected tweets from 4,688 Twitter users before, during and after they posted from the park," explained study author Aaron Schwartz. He's a Ph.D. candidat...

The 4 Keys to Emotional Well-Being

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're satisfied with your life, you probably have emotional well-being.

Emotional well-being can be mastered just like any other skill, according to Richard Davidson, founder of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

How? By developing four key traits, said Davidson, a neu...

For Heart Patients, CPAP Treatment May Ease Depression: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea can ease depression in people with heart disease, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Patients who have had a stroke or heart attack are prone to suffer from low mood and are two to three times more likely to develop clinical depression, which then further el...

Higher Risk of Mental Health Problems for Transgender College Students: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender college students are two to four times more likely than their classmates to have mental health problems, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 1,200 gender-minority students on 71 U.S. campuses who took part in an annual nationwide survey. Gender-minority means their gender identity differs from the sex assigned to the...

Nearly Half of U.S. Patients Keep Vital Secrets From Their Doctors

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. patients don't tell their physicians about potentially life-threatening risks such as domestic violence, sexual assault, depression or thoughts of suicide, a new study finds.

"For physicians to achieve your best health, they need to know what you are struggling with," said study senior author Angela Fagerlin.

U...

Here's How Too Much Social Media Can Harm Girls

WEDNESDAY, Aug 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bingeing on social media isn't good for any teen, but new research has pinpointed three ways in which hours spent on Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Facebook may harm the mental health of young girls in particular.

"Almost all of the influence of social media on mental health could be explained by the three mechanisms examined -- namely exp...

Unplugging From Social Media on Vacation? It's Tough at First

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking a vacation from social media and digital technology while you travel can cause withdrawal symptoms, but a small study suggests you'll come to enjoy the offline experience.

The British study included 24 people. During their travels to 17 countries and regions, most unplugged from technologies such as mobile phones, laptops, tablets, s...

Caring Doctors Can Be Life-Changing for Diabetic Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A kind, understanding doctor could spell the difference between life or death for diabetes patients, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that patients had a lower risk of early death if their primary care doctor exhibited empathy.

The study included 628 patients in the U.K. with type 2 diabetes. A year after their diagnos...

How to Kickstart Your Creativity

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You don't have to have the talent of a Rembrandt or Yo-Yo Ma to express creativity and get some very special benefits from doing so. Everyday creativity boosts well-being and can give you a stronger sense of purpose and engagement, and everyone can tap into it.

So why don't we do more of it?

The book, The Creativity Challenge...

Doctors Come Out Against Gay Conversion Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- So-called "conversion therapy" can trigger depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal thoughts and attempts, and it should be banished in the United States, medical experts say in a new report.

Conversion therapy is used in an attempt to change a person's sexual orientation or gender identity, most t...

New Tool for Med Students: 'Fat Suit'

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Can skinny doctors ever understand what it's like to be fat? A German medical school believes they can -- after they treat patients wearing "fat suits."

Having patients don fat suits may help teach medical students about obesity and uncover their biases against patients struggling with their weight, the researchers say.

They said red...

Explaining, Easing the Horror of Mass Shootings for Your Kids

MONDAY, Aug. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past weekend, 21 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, while a separate incident in Dayton, Ohio, claimed the lives of nine people. Dozens more were injured.

For adults, horrific and senseless events like these have become a tragic, recurrent aspect of American life over the past few decades.

B...

Could a 'Tickle' a Day Keep the Doctor Away?

FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A small electric "tickle" to the ear may affect the body's nervous system, and British researchers claim this can promote overall well-being and may potentially slow down some effects of aging.

The tickle treatment is called transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS). The procedure involves placing custom-made clips containing electrodes on...

Overweight Men May Feel Stigmatized, Too

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not only women who agonize over their excess pounds. Stigma about being overweight can cause physical and emotional harm to men, too.

"It's often assumed that conversations about weight loss, poor body image, and dieting are more salient for women. Men are frequently overlooked, but that does not necessarily mean that men are less affe...

Trees an Oasis of Mental Well-Being

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- City dwellers who live on tree-lined streets might be happier and healthier for it, a large new study suggests.

The study, of nearly 47,000 urban residents, found that those who lived in areas shaded by tree canopy reported less psychological distress and better general health over six years.

Green grass, on the other hand, didn't c...

Brain Changes Noted in Holocaust Survivors and Their Children

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Holocaust survivors may have suffered permanent harmful changes to their brain structure, and the brains of their children and grandchildren may also be affected, a small study reveals.

"After more than 70 years, the impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant," said researcher Ivan Rektor, a neurologist from Brno, Cze...

Is Caffeine Fueling Your Anxieties?

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle with anxiety, you might want to skip that second cup of coffee, new research suggests.

For some people, caffeine may help with concentration and provide an energy boost, but it can cause problems for those with general anxiety disorder, said Dr. Julie Radico, a clinical psychologist with Penn State Health.

"Caffeine i...

Money Motivates Smokers to Quit Long Term, Study Finds

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Financial rewards for quitting smoking do help smokers -- including pregnant women -- kick the habit and remain smoke-free, a new study confirms.

"Rewards, such as money or vouchers, have been used to encourage smokers to quit, and to reward them if they stay stopped. Such schemes have been used in workplaces, in clinics and hospitals, and ...

Can a Broken Heart Contribute to Cancer?

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after ...

The Happiness Dividend: Longer, Healthier Lives

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Happiness may truly be some of the best medicine available to us, a new study suggests.

People happy with themselves and their well-being tend to live longer and healthier lives than those who are perpetually down in the dumps, British researchers report.

Women in their 50s who reported enjoying their lives had a projected live expec...

Can a Budget Make You Happier?

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Clever websites and smartphone apps have made creating a household budget easier, though it's still an unappealing chore for some. But what if using a tool that makes you smarter about money could also make you happier? That would make budgeting a lot more attractive.

What's the connection? Budgeting causes you to rethink spending decisions...

Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time Together

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ageism is pervasive throughout society, and harmful to young and old alike. But a new study finds some simple steps can help erase it.

Mixing younger and older people in various settings, combined with educating younger people about the aging process and its misconceptions, works quickly to reduce ageism, the new research indicates.

...

Parent Who Listens Can Help Kids Thrive Despite Trauma

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heartfelt talks between parent and child are essential to help kids overcome tough times and do their best at school, a new study says.

Traumatic events in a kid's life can cause the child to neglect school work and increase the odds that they'll wind up repeating a grade, researchers found.

But having even one parent lend a kind and...

How Are You Feeling? Check Your Wristband

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Remember the "mood ring" craze of the 1970s?

A high-tech wristband is being developed along the same lines, potentially helping patients who struggle with mood disorders.

The smart wristband would use a person's skin to track their emotional intensity. During a mood swing, either high or low, the wristband would change color, heat up,...

Connected Teens Become Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who feel connected with others at home and school have fewer serious health problems and risks as young adults, a new study suggests.

Young adults who had higher levels of connectedness -- feeling engaged, supported and cared for at home and at school -- when they were teens were as much as 66% less likely to have mental health probl...

Meet 'Huggable,' the Robot Bear Who's Helping Hospitalized Kids

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of s...

Selfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You might be more apt to seek out a face-lift, a new nose, hair implants or a boob job if you're a fan of posting selfies on social media, a new study reports.

Adults who regularly use social media are more likely to consider getting plastic surgery to improve their online appearance, particularly if they prefer photo-heavy sites and apps, t...

How to Move Past Life's Inevitable Speed Bumps

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Setbacks are a part of life for everyone, but these stumbling blocks can be extremely difficult, even debilitating, to navigate.

Taking certain steps can make it easier for you to rebound, according to experts at the University of California, Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

It's easy to get caught up going over what happene...

Vets With PTSD Face Higher Odds for Early Death From Multiple Causes

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. veterans with PTSD are twice as likely as the general population to die from suicide, accidents and viral hepatitis, a new study finds.

Veterans with PTSD also have a higher risk of death from diabetes and liver disease, according to the study published June 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"Our findings...

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