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Results for search "Psychology / Mental Health: Misc.".

27 Feb

Work Hours And Mental Health

Women who work extra-long hours face increased risk of depression.

14 Dec

Brain Teasers and Mental Decline

Do crossword puzzles and chess really help keep your memory sharp as you age?

Health News Results - 518

Is Caffeine Fueling Your Anxieties?

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you struggle with anxiety, you might want to skip that second cup of coffee, new research suggests.

For some people, caffeine may help with concentration and provide an energy boost, but it can cause problems for those with general anxiety disorder, said Dr. Julie Radico, a clinical psychologist with Penn State Health.

"Caffeine i...

Money Motivates Smokers to Quit Long Term, Study Finds

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Financial rewards for quitting smoking do help smokers -- including pregnant women -- kick the habit and remain smoke-free, a new study confirms.

"Rewards, such as money or vouchers, have been used to encourage smokers to quit, and to reward them if they stay stopped. Such schemes have been used in workplaces, in clinics and hospitals, and ...

Can a Broken Heart Contribute to Cancer?

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after ...

The Happiness Dividend: Longer, Healthier Lives

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Happiness may truly be some of the best medicine available to us, a new study suggests.

People happy with themselves and their well-being tend to live longer and healthier lives than those who are perpetually down in the dumps, British researchers report.

Women in their 50s who reported enjoying their lives had a projected live expec...

Can a Budget Make You Happier?

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Clever websites and smartphone apps have made creating a household budget easier, though it's still an unappealing chore for some. But what if using a tool that makes you smarter about money could also make you happier? That would make budgeting a lot more attractive.

What's the connection? Budgeting causes you to rethink spending decisions...

Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time Together

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ageism is pervasive throughout society, and harmful to young and old alike. But a new study finds some simple steps can help erase it.

Mixing younger and older people in various settings, combined with educating younger people about the aging process and its misconceptions, works quickly to reduce ageism, the new research indicates.

...

Parent Who Listens Can Help Kids Thrive Despite Trauma

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heartfelt talks between parent and child are essential to help kids overcome tough times and do their best at school, a new study says.

Traumatic events in a kid's life can cause the child to neglect school work and increase the odds that they'll wind up repeating a grade, researchers found.

But having even one parent lend a kind and...

How Are You Feeling? Check Your Wristband

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Remember the "mood ring" craze of the 1970s?

A high-tech wristband is being developed along the same lines, potentially helping patients who struggle with mood disorders.

The smart wristband would use a person's skin to track their emotional intensity. During a mood swing, either high or low, the wristband would change color, heat up,...

Connected Teens Become Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who feel connected with others at home and school have fewer serious health problems and risks as young adults, a new study suggests.

Young adults who had higher levels of connectedness -- feeling engaged, supported and cared for at home and at school -- when they were teens were as much as 66% less likely to have mental health probl...

Meet 'Huggable,' the Robot Bear Who's Helping Hospitalized Kids

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of s...

Selfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You might be more apt to seek out a face-lift, a new nose, hair implants or a boob job if you're a fan of posting selfies on social media, a new study reports.

Adults who regularly use social media are more likely to consider getting plastic surgery to improve their online appearance, particularly if they prefer photo-heavy sites and apps, t...

How to Move Past Life's Inevitable Speed Bumps

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Setbacks are a part of life for everyone, but these stumbling blocks can be extremely difficult, even debilitating, to navigate.

Taking certain steps can make it easier for you to rebound, according to experts at the University of California, Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

It's easy to get caught up going over what happene...

Vets With PTSD Face Higher Odds for Early Death From Multiple Causes

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. veterans with PTSD are twice as likely as the general population to die from suicide, accidents and viral hepatitis, a new study finds.

Veterans with PTSD also have a higher risk of death from diabetes and liver disease, according to the study published June 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"Our findings...

Thanks for the Stinky Memories: Scientists Say Bad Smells Boost Recall

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bad smells, better memory?

A series of experiments with volunteers aged 13 to 25 showed that they were better able to recall images that were associated with unpleasant odors.

Specifically, they had better recall of images 24 hours after seeing them if the images were paired with a bad smell.

The study also found that peopl...

How Working Out in Anger Can Put You at Risk

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Research points to a very long list of benefits from exercise, from improving your overall health to easing stress and enhancing mental well-being. But a landmark study in the journal Circulation highlights a negative, yet specific, concern.

While health factors like obesity and diabetes are known heart attack triggers, data from 12,500...

'Lost Wallet' Test Reveals How Honest People Are

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you tend to doubt the honesty of strangers, the results of a new study may come as a surprise: All around the globe, people are more likely to return a lost wallet if it's loaded with cash.

In experiments done in 40 countries, researchers found that people were more likely to return a lost wallet to its owner if it contained a large amoun...

How Much Work Brings Happiness? Not Much, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.

The study, of more than 70,000 adults in the United Kingdom, found that when unemployed people found a job, their mental health typically improved. But, on average, it only took eight hours of work per week -- w...

Many Lesbian, Gay Teens Still Face Rejection by Parents

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents of lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) children take years to adjust after learning about their sexual orientation, a new study finds.

The study included more than 1,200 parents of LGB youth aged 10 to 25. The parents visited a website with LGB resources and were asked to complete a questionnaire.

Of those parents, 26%...

U.S. Youth Suicide Rate Reaches 20-Year High

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide rates among teens and young adults have reached their highest point in nearly two decades, a new study reports.

Suicides among teens have especially spiked, with an annual percentage change of 10% between 2014 and 2017 for 15- to 19-year-olds, researchers said.

"It really is an unprecedented surge," said lead author Oren Mir...

Why Do Young Women Get Addicted to Indoor Tanning?

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of depression and genetic risk may fuel an addiction to indoor tanning.

That's the conclusion of a new study out of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.

For the study, researchers surveyed nearly 300 women who used indoor tanning beds, sunlamps or sun booths, and analyzed DNA samples. Th...

Did 'Puppy Dog Eyes' Evolve to Please Humans?

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pooches look up at people with quizzical, pleading eyes that are tough to resist. Now, research suggests evolution played a role in that irresistible gaze.

Dogs were domesticated more than 33,000 years ago and have changed over time to communicate with people, the study authors noted.

Dogs' eyebrows are particularly expressive. Dogs...

When Healthy Eating Turns Into a Dangerous Obsession

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When eating healthy becomes an around-the-clock obsession, it could be a sign of trouble.

An extreme preoccupation with clean eating is an eating order called orthorexia nervosa. Though less well-known than anorexia nervosa or bulimia -- and not as well-documented -- a new study review says orthorexia can also have serious emotional and physica...

2 Hours/Week in Nature: Your Prescription for Better Health?

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Spending just a couple of hours a week enjoying nature may do your body and mind some good, a new study suggests.

The study, of nearly 20,000 adults in England, found that people who spent at least two hours outdoors in the past week gave higher ratings to their physical health and mental well-being.

There could, of course, be many...

Drug ODs, Suicides Soaring Among Millennials: Report

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- So-called "deaths of despair" are skyrocketing among millennials, with thousands of 18- to 34-year-olds losing their lives to drugs, alcohol and suicide each year, a new report says.

During the past decade, drug-related deaths among that age group increased by 108%, alcohol-induced deaths by 69%, and suicides by 35%, according to t...

Workouts: A Prescription to Ease Severe Chronic Anxiety?

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone experiences anxious moments now and then. But for those with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), the worry is frequent and overwhelming, often interfering with everyday activities.

Now, a small study suggests that these burdensome feelings can be quelled with a little heart-pumping activity.

The study found that just a h...

'Dad Shaming' Is Real, Survey Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not just Moms: Just ahead of Father's Day, a new survey finds that about half of American dads say they've been criticized about their parenting styles.

The way they enforced discipline topped the list of things naysayers called them to task on, with two-thirds of critiques focused on that subject.

Forty-four percent of the ...

1 in 5 People Living in Conflict Areas Has a Mental Health Problem

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 22% of people who live in conflict areas suffer from mental health problems, a new study review finds.

Common problems include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, according to the World Health Organization. About 9% have a moderate to severe mental health condition.

<...

Soldiers' Odds for Suicide Quadruple When Loaded Gun at Home

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Owning their own firearm, carrying it in public and keeping it loaded in the home: These three factors are each tied to a fourfold rise in the likelihood that a U.S. soldier will take his or her own life, a new report finds.

Suicides among soldiers remain rare, but numbers have been on the rise in recent years, noted study lead author Dr. Davi...

Feeling Stressed? Then Your Dog Probably Feels Stressed, Too

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- This dog-eat-dog world got you feeling anxious? If so, your canine companion probably feels the same way, new research shows.

A Swedish research team measured levels of the stress hormone cortisol in hair samples taken from dogs and their owners.

"We found that the levels of long-term cortisol in the dog and its owner were synchroniz...

Instagram 'Self-Harm' Posts Give Rise to Copycat Behavior

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being an Instagram influencer isn't always a good thing. New research found that vulnerable young people who see online posts of self-harm -- like cutting -- may copy those destructive behaviors.

Almost one-third of teens and young adults who reported seeing self-harm posts on Instagram said they had performed the same or similar self-harming...

Lesbian, Gay Youth at Higher Risk for Self-Harm

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An alarming number of teens practice self-harm, but lesbian, gay and bisexual teens may be more than twice as likely as their straight peers to cut, hit or bruise themselves, new research warns.

While between 10% and 20% of heterosexual teens engaged in these dangerous behaviors, 38% to 53% of lesbian, gay and bisexual teens did...

Many Feel 'Frozen' When Heart Attack Strikes

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a heart attack occurs, delaying treatment by even a few minutes could be deadly.

But many people wait hours after symptoms set in to get care -- either because they feel mentally "frozen" and unable to act, or because they're slow to recognize the seriousness of the situation, a new survey reveals.

The finding stems from a look...

Teasing Kids About Weight Linked to More Weight Gain

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research illustrates a heartbreaking, vicious cycle: Teasing kids about their weight not only bruises their self-esteem, it also appears to trigger more weight gain.

In fact, middle schoolers who reported high levels of weight-related teasing had a 33% higher jump in their body mass index per year compared to peers who weren't teased ...

For People With Heart Failure, Loneliness Can Mean Worse Care

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than 1 in 10 heart failure patients follow lifestyle treatment recommendations, and a new study suggests that loneliness is a major reason why.

Polish researchers assessed 475 heart failure patients' compliance with a regimen of restricting salt and fluid intake, being physically active, and weighing themselves each day.

Only 7...

Doctor Burnout Costly for Patients, Health Care System

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exhausted, stressed-out doctors are responsible for poorer care, patient dissatisfaction and malpractice lawsuits that carry a huge cost for U.S. health care, researchers report.

In fact, it's calculated that physician burnout adds nearly $5 billion a year to health care spending in the United States.

"Physician burnout is known to b...

Who's Most Likely to Miss School Due to Eczema?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic and black children are more likely to miss school than white children due to the chronic skin condition eczema, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed more than a decade of data on more than 8,000 2- to 17-year-olds enrolled in a national eczema registry. Overall, 3.3% missed six or more days of school over a six-month period.

...

Worry Less for Better Health

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you worry a lot? Besides the anxiety it's causing you emotionally, it can threaten your health.

Whether you worry over actual problems or the fear of future ones, it interferes with sleep and quality of life. And, according to research done at Case Western Reserve University, it can be so intrusive that it harms your important relationships,...

Open Communication Helps Teens Manage Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a simple concept, but new research reinforces the idea: Teens with type 1 diabetes benefit when they feel their concerns have been heard.

Teens with type 1 diabetes may experience anger, frustration and anxiety if they haven't met their treatment goals. Their parents and health care providers may also feel frustrated and may blame the t...

Love the Smell of a Cup o' Joe? Here's What That Reveals About You

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Java junkies can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee, and the more they drink, the better they can smell it, British researchers say.

It's a discovery with powerful implications for treating people addicted to substances with a distinct smell.

"The higher the caffeine use, the quicker a person recognized the odor of coffee," said s...

Suicides Increase Among U.S. Kids, But More in Girls Than Boys

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide rates are on the rise among American children, but the increase is greatest among girls, a new study finds.

"Overall, we found a disproportionate increase in female youth suicide rates compared to males, resulting in a narrowing of the gap between male and female suicide rates," said study author Donna Ruch. She is a postdoctoral resear...

When E-Cig Makers Offer Promotional Items, More Teens Likely to Vape

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coupons, samples, branded hats and T-shirts: When teens use or wear promotional items from companies that make alternative tobacco products like electronic cigarettes, they are more likely to try those products, new research shows.

The study included 757 California teens, aged 13 to 19, who were followed for a year. At the beginning of the year...

Many Elite Athletes Ashamed to Seek Help for Mental Illness

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds.

It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping and lack of understanding about mental health issues.

That's the consensus of resea...

Millennials Believe 'Narcissist' Label, But Don't Like It

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young Americans tend to accept the popular notion that their generation is self-centered and entitled, but they also resent those labels, new research suggests.

In a series of surveys, researchers found that most people -- regardless of age -- believed the narcissistic stereotype often assigned to millennials and Generation Z.

Youn...

Anxiety Meds Like Valium, Xanax Could Raise Miscarriage Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy is often a time of heightened worry. But researchers warn that taking anti-anxiety drugs like Valium and Xanax may increase the risk of miscarriage.

Called benzodiazepines, these powerful drugs have long been prescribed to treat a variety of mood disorders. However, a new Canadian study finds that when taken in early pregnancy, t...

Thriving in a Multi-Generational Home

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're part of a multi-generational home, you're in good company. The number of Americans living with two or more adult generations of one family rose during the last recession and has grown to an all-time high during the recovery.

More than 64 million Americans live in a multi-generational home, according to a census analysis by the Pew ...

More Than 600,000 Opioid Abusers Raising Kids in U.S.

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They might be too young to abuse opioids themselves, but America's kids are suffering nonetheless because of their drug-dependent parents.

New research shows more than 600,000 American parents with kids under 18 are addicted to opioids.

That amounts to almost 1% of parents of minors, most of whom aren't getting treated, the study...

Anger a Threat to Health in Old Age

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it's anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more.

Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and arthritis, the researchers said.

"As most people age, they simply cannot do the act...

New Treatment Guideline Focuses on Tourette Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tourette syndrome can be a nerve-wracking condition, but there are effective treatments for sufferers, a new American Academy of Neurology guideline says.

Tourette is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins in childhood and causes involuntary vocalizations and repetitive movements known as tics.

Accurate diagnosis, ongoing medical...

Shame Around Mental Illness May Be Fading, Survey Shows

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stigma regarding mental health could be disappearing in the United States, a new survey finds.

In the online poll of more than 1,000 adults, 87% said a mental disorder is nothing to be ashamed of, and 86% said they believe that people with such disorders can get better.

And a sizable group doesn't view the most common mental d...

Want to Save Money While Shopping? Leave Your Phone Home

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows about cellphones and the threat of distracted driving. But how about distracted shopping?

Using your cellphone while shopping might make you susceptible to buying stuff you didn't intend to buy, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that people who used cellphones while shopping were more likely to forget what they we...

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