New features, new look and now mobile-responsive! No need to re-register.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Prescription Drugs".

21 Mar

Balancing Safety and Efficacy of ADHD Drugs

The risk of psychosis in young patients taking certain ADHD medications is low.

15 Mar

What's Really In Your Medicine

More than 90 percent of medications contain inactive ingredients that can cause adverse reactions.

Health News Results - 362

Epilepsy DrugTied to Higher Risk of Suicidal Behavior in Young Users

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study supports the notion that a drug used to control epilepsy and other disorders could make some young people more prone to suicide.

The medicine, pregabalin (Lyrica), comes from a class of drugs called gabapentinoids. Besides their use against epilepsy, these drugs are also used to treat nerve pain and anxiety disorders, as well as ...

Opioid Misuse, Binge Drinking Often Go Hand in Hand

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Of the more than 4 million Americans who misuse prescription opioids, more than half also binge drink, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Put another way, people who binge drink are two times more likely to misuse opioids than non-drinkers, the agency reveals in a new study.

"We are losing far too man...

Drug May Help Delay Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A two-year delay in the onset of type 1 diabetes could make a big difference for people with the disease. And researchers say a new drug may make that postponement possible.

Researchers gave the drug teplizumab or a placebo to a small group of people who were nearly certain to develop type 1 diabetes, based on genetics and certain symptoms. Th...

Heartburn Drugs Again Tied to Fatal Risks

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who use common heartburn drugs for months to years may face heightened risks of dying from heart disease, kidney failure or stomach cancer, a new study suggests.

The study included more than 200,000 U.S. veterans. It's the latest to raise concerns over drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). They include prescription and over-the-c...

Dentists Prescribe Antibiotics Far Too Often: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Dentists tend to be overeager when it comes to prescribing antibiotics, new research suggests.

The study authors found that antibiotics prescribed to prevent infection during dental procedures weren't necessary 81% of the time. That's important because 10% of all antibiotic prescriptions come from dentists, the researchers said.

...

'Secret Shopper' Study Finds Many Who Need Addiction Treatment Can't Get It

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When people who are addicted to opioids make the difficult decision to quit, the last thing they need to face are barriers to treatment.

Yet, a new "secret shopper" study suggests most addicts seeking a prescription for buprenorphine -- which helps people stop using opioids -- would have trouble even getting an appointment with a doctor qualif...

Another Use for Beta Blockers? Curbing A-fib

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People whose heart rhythm problems stem from stress and anger may benefit from taking beta blocker drugs, a new study suggests.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is a common type of heart rhythm disorder sometimes triggered by stress and negative emotions.

Beta blockers are drugs that block the effects of adrenaline and related substances....

Newer Drug Extends Lives of Young Breast Cancer Patients

SATURDAY, June 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a newer drug to standard hormone therapy lengthens the lives of younger women with advanced breast cancer, a new trial has found.

The drug, called Kisqali (ribociclib), is already approved for treating such patients -- based on earlier results showing it can delay the progression of their cancer.

...

Patients Who Read Doctors' Notes More Likely to Take Their Meds

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Reading the notes your doctor makes during your visit appears to be good medicine.

An online survey of 20,000 adults treated at three U.S. health systems that have made clinical notes available to patients for several years finds that those who actually read them may be more likely to take medications as prescribed.

Patients listed se...

Many Heart Failure Patients Might Safely Reduce Use of Diuretics

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure is a common ailment afflicting older Americans, and many take drugs called diuretics to rid the body of excess fluid buildup that can impede breathing.

Now, a team of Brazilian researchers say that, in some cases, it's safe for patients with stable heart failure to stop taking diuretic drugs.

"Patients don't like using d...

Though  'Donut Hole' Is Shrinking, Medicare Drug Costs Are Rising: Study

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors' out-of-pocket costs for cancer drugs continue to rise steadily, with patients paying thousands of dollars each year despite efforts to close the Medicare Part D "donut hole," researchers said.

Prices for 13 anticancer drugs available through Medicare Part D in 2010 rose an average 8% over inflation every year over the past decade,...

Opioid Prescriptions to Teens, Young Adults Still Common

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even amid an epidemic of abuse, opioid painkillers are still commonly prescribed to teenagers and young adults for conditions like tooth and back pain, a new study finds.

Researchers found that between 2005 and 2015, opioids were prescribed to teens and college-age adults at nearly 57 million visits to doctors' offices and emergency department...

U.S. Dentists Prescribe 37 Times More Opioids Than in England: Study

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the nation's opioid epidemic, U.S. dentists are far more likely to prescribe addictive opioid painkillers than their British counterparts, a new study reveals.

In 2016, American dentists wrote 37 times as many opioid prescriptions as British dentists: 1.4 million versus 28,000.

And while 22% of all prescriptions fr...

High-Deductible Health Plans Can Harm COPD Patients: Study

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a rule, high-deductible health plans carry lower premiums than low-deductible plans. But that might not be such a great deal for patients struggling with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), new research suggests.

Such plans may be impacting the quality of health care for those with the progressive lung disease, researchers report...

Rising Rx Drug Costs Continue to Create Tough Choices for Seniors

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A solid minority of senior citizens still struggles to afford their prescription medications, a new government report shows.

About 5% of adults 65 and older don't take their medication as prescribed to cut costs, according to survey data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And nearly 1 in 5 seniors has ask...

Kids of Opioid-Using Parents May Be More Likely to Attempt Suicide

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children of parents who use opioids have more than double the risk of attempted suicide, a new study finds.

Researchers noted that along with a dramatic rise in suicides among young people in the United States in the past 15 years, opioid use among adults has spiked. This study suggests a possible link between the two.

"We theorize...

For Many With Mild Asthma, Popular Rx May Not Work: Study

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A widely used type of asthma medication may not work in more than half of patients who are prescribed it, new research shows.

Inhaled corticosteroids, which are designed to reduce airway inflammation, are recommended for all patients with persistent asthma.

But this medication's effectiveness may be limited to a type of inflammation ...

Anxiety Meds Like Valium, Xanax Could Raise Miscarriage Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy is often a time of heightened worry. But researchers warn that taking anti-anxiety drugs like Valium and Xanax may increase the risk of miscarriage.

Called benzodiazepines, these powerful drugs have long been prescribed to treat a variety of mood disorders. However, a new Canadian study finds that when taken in early pregnancy, t...

Quantity, Not Type of Opioid Matters for Post-Op Dependency

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the United States struggles with a painkiller-abuse epidemic, researchers have found that it's the quantity of opioids prescribed after orthopedic surgery, not the type of opioid, that corresponds with long-term use.

"One of the frequent myths we encounter among clinicians is that some types of opioids, such as hydromorphone, are more dange...

Americans' Prescription Med Use Is Declining

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bucking a longstanding upward trend, new data shows that the percentage of Americans taking any prescription drug has fallen slightly over the past decade.

Still, nearly half -- 45.8% -- of Americans said they took at least one prescription medicine over the past month, according to a national survey conducted in 2015-2016.

Tha...

Dispensing Opioid Antidote Without a Prescription Might Save Lives

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid overdose deaths would decline dramatically if U.S. pharmacists could dispense the antidote naloxone without a doctor's prescription, a new study says.

In states that have adopted such laws, opioid deaths fell an average of 27% in the year after passage and 34% in following years, according to a RAND Corp. analysis of 2005 to 2016 ...

Could Common Heart Meds Lower Prostate Cancer Risk?

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Good news for men: That blood pressure medication you're taking might be doing double duty, helping reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer, a new study shows.

Researchers found that a beta blocker called atenolol cut men's risk of intermediate-grade prostate cancer about in half, compared with men not taking a beta blocker.

It ...

MS Patients Now Pay 20 Times More for Drugs Than a Decade Ago

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and Parkinson's can be physically taxing conditions, but new research shows they exact a huge financial toll as well.

Over a 12-year period, out-of-pocket costs for Americans with these illnesses jumped, with the biggest increase seen among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Those patients paid 20 times more fo...

Newer Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Kids, Teens

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A type 2 diabetes drug for adults also controls blood sugar levels in children and teens with the disease, researchers report.

Type 2 diabetes is on the rise among children and teens, but they have fewer treatment choices than adults, the study authors said. Currently, the only drugs approved for treatment of children and teens with type 2 d...

VA Doctors Prescribing Unnecessary Antibiotics, Study Says

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic overuse is a major problem throughout the world. Now a new study finds four in 10 outpatients were inappropriately prescribed antibiotics at a major U.S. Veterans Affairs health system.

That rate is higher than in previous studies on outpatient antibiotic use. Improper use of the drugs is associated with increased illness, cost and...

Got Unused Meds? Saturday Is National Drug Take Back Day

FRIDAY, April 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you have unused or expired medications at home, be sure to take them to one of thousands of drop-off sites across the country on National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, Saturday, April 27.

Getting rid of excess meds could save a life, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

"From our studies of the opioid epidemic,...

Medical Marijuana Use Rising Among Cancer Patients

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with cancer are more likely to use marijuana and prescription opioids than those without cancer, and the use of medical marijuana by this group is on the rise, new research shows.

Pain is common among cancer patients, but many do not get adequate pain relief, the researchers noted.

The new study looked at more than 800 adu...

Heart Patients Pay the Price When Nearby Pharmacy Closes

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a neighborhood pharmacy shuts down, it could have dire repercussions for heart patients living nearby, new research suggests.

That's because such closures could mean patients skip or stop taking the prescriptions they need to stay healthy and safe, according to a team from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

"These findings ...

Chemo Drug Shortages Have Little Effect on Cancer Care: Study

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer drug shortages don't appear to have a significant impact on chemotherapy treatment in the United States, according to a new study.

"These findings are surprising in light of the substantial media and policy attention that the cancer drug shortage problem has garnered," said study co-author Mireille Jacobson. She's an associate profes...

Don't Suddenly Stop Taking a Prescribed Opioid, FDA Warns

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the danger of "serious harm" to patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising doctors not to suddenly stop patients from taking opioid painkillers, or drastically lower the dose.

In a statement released Tuesday, the agency said it is adding a warning about sudden discontinuation of use to the prescribing informatio...

Insurers' Denials of Opioid Coverage Spurs CDC to Clarify Guidelines

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with severe pain from cancer or sickle cell anemia should not be denied coverage for opioid painkillers, a new clarification on federal guidelines states.

In the wake of the national opioid epidemic, various medical societies had encouraged doctors to rein in prescriptions for the powerful painkillers.

In 2016, the U.S. Cente...

Nurse Practitioners Often Restricted From Prescribing Opioid Treatments

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that suggests that not all weapons are being deployed in the opioid war, new research shows that nurse practitioners often face tough restrictions for prescribing a medication that treats opioid addiction.

At least six states with high opioid addiction rates have rules that restrict nurse practitioners (NPs) in prescribing bupren...

Microbes on International Space Station Are Familiar From Earth

MONDAY, April 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have been cataloging bacteria and fungi inside the International Space Station (ISS), and they say their efforts will should keep astronauts safe and could also have benefits on Earth.

The team analyzed samples collected from eight locations on the space station during three flights across 14 months. The samples came from the viewin...

High Insulin Costs Come Under Fire on Capitol Hill

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For many Americans, the cost of lifesaving insulin is simply too high, leading as many as one in four to ration the drug, experts testifying before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce said this week.

The meeting focused primarily on defining the problem and exploring potential solutions, such as lowering the list prices of insulin an...

Is That Medication Safe When Breastfeeding?

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Far too little is known about the safety of medication use during breastfeeding -- and it's time to get some answers, experts say.

It's a critical gap, given that breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for babies -- and moms are encouraged to do it. But when a woman has questions about the safety of any medication she's taking, docto...

Under-the-Tongue Allergy Pills Replacing Shots for Many

TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Under-the-tongue allergy pills have quickly caught on as a way to treat hay fever and dust mite allergies, a new study finds.

Allergy shots have been available for more than 100 years, while sublingual, or under-the-tongue, allergy pills were only approved for use in the United States in 2014.

But of 268 U.S. allergists surveyed las...

Second New MS Drug Secures FDA Approval

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved another new multiple sclerosis drug -- the second in one week.

Mavenclad (cladribine) pills can be used to treat relapsing forms of MS in adults, including relapsing-remitting disease and active secondary progressive disease. The drug is not recommended for MS patients with a course of the dis...

Special Bag Helps Patients Get Rid of Unused Opioids

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After undergoing surgery, many people who are prescribed opioid painkillers have no idea how to dispose of leftover pills so they won't be misused by others or harm the environment.

Giving special disposal bags to these patients more than doubled the percentage of people who safely disposed of their unused painkillers, according to researcher...

Common MS Treatment Can Bring Longer, Healthier Life

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An older but still common multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment has an unexpected perk: It not only quells symptoms, but patients may also live longer.

New research revealed that patients taking a beta interferon drug for more than three years were likely to live longer than those who took one for a shorter time or who didn't take one at all. <...

Dual-Drug Therapy May Boost Odds Against a Tough Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's good news for women battling a particularly difficult form of advanced breast cancer.

In a new study of patients with so-called "hormone receptor-positive" breast cancer that's spread beyond the breast, women who received a combo of two anti-estrogen drugs right away lived many months more than those who got just one drug, the rese...

FDA OKs New Drug for Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new pill for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) has won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Generally, relapsing MS involves periods of worsening symptoms followed by recovery periods. Over time, some disability follows independent of relapses, and this is called secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, or SPMS....

Bad Info May Be Scaring Patients Away From Heart-Healthy Statins

WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than a quarter of people who could benefit from taking statins don't, and a new survey suggests that while not enough doctors are prescribing the cholesterol-lowering drugs, fears about side effects also play a part.

"There is so much misinformation about statins in the media that it's clearly permeated and now is affecting people's a...

Risk of Psychosis Varies With ADHD Meds, But Still Small: Study

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stimulant drugs used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) carry a small risk of a psychotic episode, but it appears to vary depending on which medication young people use, a new study finds.

Soon after receiving a stimulant prescription, about one in 660 teens and young adults developed psychotic symptoms, such as hall...

Many With Opioid Addiction Don't Get Meds That Can Help

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people struggling with opioid addiction lack access to FDA-approved medications that can head off withdrawal symptoms and quell their cravings, a new report finds.

Methadone, buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone all help opioid addicts by targeting the same brain receptors triggered by narcotics, and they have been proven eff...

Prescription Fish Oil Pill Lowers Heart Attack Risk in Those Already on Statins

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have high triglycerides and take cholesterol-lowering statins to lower their risk for heart attack or stroke can cut that risk by another 30 percent by adding a high-dose omega-3 fatty acid pill, investigators report.

The prescription drug, called Vascepa, is not to be confused with over-the-counter dietary omega-3 (often...

Despite Big Heart Benefits, Far Too Many Skip Statins

SATURDAY, March 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who've already had a heart attack or stroke can cut their odds for another one in half if they regularly take cholesterol-lowering statins.

Yet new research found that only about 6 percent of patients take these drugs as prescribed by their doctor.

"Very few patients were optimally compliant. We...

Opioid Rxs Decreasing, But Not for All Doctors

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors may be pulling out their prescription pads less often for opioid medications, but not everyone's on the same page yet.

New research found that initial prescriptions for the addictive painkillers have dropped by around 50 percent.

"The good news is that we're making progress curtailing prescription opioids, but we have t...

Are 'Inactive' Ingredients in Your Drugs Really So Harmless?

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 90 percent of the medications that Americans take contain an inactive ingredient that could cause an allergic reaction, a new study suggests.

Lactose, peanut oil, gluten and chemical dyes are added to drugs to improve taste, prolong shelf life, improve absorption or make the drug tamper-proof, researchers explained. But they can ...

FDA OKs Blood Pressure Drug to Ease Shortage Due to Recalls

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new generic version of the high blood pressure/heart failure drug valsartan, saying the move might help ease the current medication shortage.

The agency said it prioritized review of the drug from Alkem Laboratories Ltd. after multiple recalls of other generic valsartan products d...

ADHD Meds Safe With Epilepsy, Study Finds

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often occurs in people with epilepsy. Now, new research provides reassurance that taking ADHD medications won't raise their risk of seizures.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from thousands of epilepsy patients in Sweden. Taking ADHD medications such as Ritalin (methylphenidate), was as...

Show All Health News Results

Wellness Library Results - 9

How do you tell whether an online pharmacy is legitimate? Armed with the information below, you can easily weed out unscrupulous sellers and take advantage of the convenience of buying prescription drugs online. How do I know if a pharmacy is legitimate? The National Association of Boards of Pharmacies has an excellent screening tool: It issues a seal of approval, called VIPPS, which is short for ...

Ever since aspirin hit the market in the late 1800s, it has been a fixture in medicine cabinets everywhere -- and for good reason. It erases headaches, soothes arthritis, lowers fevers, helps prevent heart disease, and may even ward off some types of cancer. If it were discovered today, doctors would hail it as a medical breakthrough. But for some people, aspirin has a serious downside -- especia...

"I used to stockpile antibiotics," admits Ann Pascual, an editor for an Internet-based company in northern California. "I'd get a prescription, take half of it, and keep the rest. Sometimes I'd give a handful to friends who were sick. Instructions on the label? I don't think I ever really even read them." Fortunately, Pascual suffered no ill consequences from taking antibiotics haphazardly. Barbar...

What special risks do medications pose for seniors? As people grow older, needing a prescription medicine is almost as inevitable as gray hair and reading glasses. Two-thirds of all seniors take at least one medication each day, and 25 percent take three or more. Many seniors owe their lives -- or at least their lifestyles -- to medications, but the remedies can also carry serious risks. As a sen...

Can prescription drugs be hazardous for senior citizens? Senior citizens need more medications than any other sector of the population, and the drugs can take a toll. By some estimates, one-third of their prescriptions may trigger serious consequences. While some of the risk is unavoidable, you can provide some protection for yourself and loved ones by staying informed. Many thousands of dangerou...

At a time when millions of Americans are making dangerous mistakes with their medications, experts are taking a hard look at the labels on prescription drugs. Are the labels really as clear and informative as they could be? The instructions on labels are often complicated and hard to understand -- if you can read the small type in the first place. But the most baffling items on labels may be the ...

A pill bottle with a skull and crossbones on it sends a universal warning: DANGER. But in plain view in the average home, dozens of items used every day are potentially hazardous. And when young children touch and swallow things that catch their eye -- peppermint pink cleaning fluid or bright red iron pills -- the substances can be fatal. Hundreds of children were dying from poisoning each year ...

What image comes to mind when you think of a drug addict? Do you picture someone smoking crack or shooting heroin? You'd be wrong. A typical drug abuser could easily be your next-door neighbor, the teen who babysits your kids, or the grandmother you chat with at the grocery store. That's because drug abusers could be abusing the medication they bought at the local pharmacy. About 7 million Americ...

Thanks to the tribulations of Rush Limbaugh and a cover story in The New York Times Magazine, just about everyone has heard of OxyContin addiction. Naturally, some patients with prescriptions for the pain reliever are worried that they, too, will get hooked. OxyContin is one of many opioids that are used for chronic pain management. When taken properly, these opioids are very effective and very s...

Show All Wellness Library Results