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Depression Could Take Toll on Memory With Age

Depression and memory declines may be closely linked in older people, new research suggests.

“Our study shows that the relationship between depression and poor memory cuts both ways, with depressive symptoms preceding memory decline and memory decline linked to subsequent depressive symptoms," said senior study author Dr. Dorina Ca...

Work That Challenges Your Brain Helps You Stay Sharp With Age

Jobs that challenge your mind could help your brain age more gracefully, a new study suggests.

The harder your brain works on the job, the less likely you are to have memory and thinking problems later in life, researchers reported April 17 in the journal Neurology.

“We examined the demands of various jobs and found that cognitive stimulation at work during different sta...

More Evidence Sleep Apnea Harms Thinking, Memory

Sleep apnea could have detrimental effects on the brain, causing memory or thinking problems, a new study suggests.

People suffering from sleep apnea are about 50% more likely to also report having memory or thinking problems, compared to those without sleep apnea, researchers say.

“These findings highlight the importance of early screening for sleep apnea,” said researcher

Your Brain Finds Ways to Compensate Against Age-Related Decline

No one's brain is as sharp at 60 as it was at 20.

However, new research supports the notion that folk's brains can make subtle adjustments with age to compensate for that decline.

A team of British researchers has found more evidence that as the mind ages, it sometimes recruits help from certain brain regions to make up for deficits elsewhere.

This does not happen for everyone...

Ancient Greeks Seldom Hit by Dementia, Suggesting It's a Modern Malady

Dementia seems like a disorder that's always haunted the human race.

But this form of severe memory loss is actually a modern malady, if classical Greek and Roman physicians are to be believed.

A new analysis of ancient Greek and Roman medical texts suggests that dementia was extremely rare 2,000 to 2,500 years ago, in the time of Aristotle, Galen and Pliny the Elder.

The new ...

Poor Sleep in Your 30s, 40s Could Mean Memory Problems Later

People who get poor sleep in their 30s and 40s might be more likely to develop memory and thinking problems a decade later, a new study warns.

Those who had the most disrupted sleep in early adulthood had more than double the odds of poor thinking performance when tested in middle age, compared to those who had the best sleep, researchers found.

At the same time, researchers found n...

Resolve to Get a Free Memory Screening in 2024

There are so many New Year's resolutions from which to choose, but an important one could be to schedule a memory screening, experts say.

Memory screenings consist of a series of questions that gauge memory and brain function, according to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA).

These regular screenings are an important way to detect memory problems early, and should be part of...

Pets Bring Health Boost to Single Seniors' Brains: Study

For the growing number of American seniors who live alone, having a beloved dog or cat by their side could help them maintain a healthy brain.

New research on more than 7,900 people averaging 66 years of age found that those who lived alone were able to stave off losses in memory and thinking if they had a pet.

Pet ownership didn't seem to affect the cognition of older folks who liv...

More Research Shows the Brain Benefits of Exercise

Regular exercise appears to enhance and even grow crucial areas of the human brain, new research using MRI scans shows.

It's long been known that physical activity is a brain-booster, but this international study illustrates ways this could be happening.

“With comprehensive imaging scans, our study underscores the interconnected synergy between the body and the brain," said study ...

Wasabi Shows Memory-Boosting Powers in Study

Wasabi, that green condiment that spices up your sushi, may possess memory-boosting powers, a new Japanese study suggests.

Lead researcher Rui Nouchi, an associate professor at Tohoku University's Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, said the strength of the results surprised the team, despite th...

Cognitive Decline May Come Earlier for People With Epilepsy

People with epilepsy suffer quicker declines in thinking than people without the brain disorder, particularly if they also have risk factors like high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study finds.

The difference was significant: Over the course of the 14-year study, those with epilepsy experienced a 65% to 70% faster decline in memory and thinking skills.

On top of that, having ris...

In Twins Study, Concussions in Early Life Tied to Memory Issues Decades Later

Your thinking and memory skills may take a hit decades after recovering from a concussion, a new study indicates.

Scientists who studied male twins, from an average age of 67, found that earlier concussions were tied to lower scores on tests of thinking and memory. These men also had a more rapid decline in their cognitive skills — skills needed for reasoning and the acquisition o...

Yoga Might Do Wonders for Women's Aging Brains

Yoga is known for its benefits to both the mind and body. And a gentle form of yoga may be an ideal early intervention technique for older women at risk of Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

In a small study involving kundalini yoga, participants reported that its stress-relieving effects translated to more efficient memory.

“Women tend to practice yoga more readily...

Memory Troubles? Your Race Could Affect How Soon You Get Diagnosis, Treatment

Black Americans are less likely to be seen at a memory clinic than their white peers. So too are folks from neighborhoods that are poor and lack educational and job opportunities, according to a new study.

That could mean later diagnosis and treatment for dementias like Alzheimer's disease.

The research, published online Aug. 2 in Neurology, involved data from more than 4...

Memory Issues Could Be Another Struggle for Kids With Autism

Children with autism have well-known difficulties with social interactions, but a new study is highlighting another area where they can struggle: memory.

Researchers found that compared with their peers, school-age kids with autism showed more difficulty managing memory tasks. They often had a hard time remembering faces — something seen in past studies — but also in recalling words a...

Erectile Troubles in Middle Age a Bad Sign for Men's Brains

Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been tied to an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Now, research suggests that erectile woes during late middle age may also be linked to a man's chances of developing memory issues later on.

“Because subtle changes in erectile function were related to memory decline, our results suggest that neglecting this aspect of se...

Compounds in Chocolate, Berries Might Help Boost Memory As You Age

You'll likely lose some of your memory and thinking abilities as you age, but nutrients called flavanols might help thwart that decline, a new study suggests.

Not getting enough flavanols -- natural compounds found in fruits, vegetables and even chocolate -- could be driving that age-related memory loss, researchers say.

This research is the pinnacle of 1...

Could Long COVID Change Brain Activity?

Scientists report that brain scans of long COVID patients show abnormal activity in areas related to memory.

The scan results validate the concerns of these patients, who feel like they're experiencing fatigue, trouble concentrating and memory issues, even though their scores on thinking tests don't show it.

“We were able to show that even though they were able to do the task -- t...

Does Exercise Really Help Your Brain? Jury Still Out

It's long been thought that working out helps a person stay sharp, but a new review argues there's little solid scientific evidence for the mental benefits of physical exercise.

Individual clinical trial results have tended to support the idea that regular exercise helps maintain brain health.

But a combined review of 109 trials involving more than 11,000 healthy folks found evidenc...

Could COVID Trigger 'Face Blindness'?

The list of symptoms that can strike long COVID sufferers has just gotten a little longer, and a little more mysterious: Researchers are reporting a case of "face blindness" related to the syndrome.

The condition, known medically as prosopagnosia, causes a very specific impairment: trouble discerning one face from another. Even the once-familiar face of a loved one might as well be a stra...

Alzheimer's Report: Many Seniors With Memory Issues Aren't Telling Their Doctors

Alzheimer's is one of the most common and serious diseases of aging, yet many older adults with memory issues are not telling their doctors about their struggles.

That's according to a new report from the Alzheimer's Association that focuses on whether doctors and patients are discussing early warning signs of the disease. The answer, often, is no.

In focus group discussions, the as...

Initial Symptoms Could Predict How Fast Alzheimer's Progresses

Memory loss is the most common symptom associated with Alzheimer's disease — the terrifying prospect of slowly forgetting yourself and everything around you.

But people who exhibit memory loss early on in their dementia actually have a slower rate of decline than those who develop other symptoms earlier, a

New Year: Time for Your Memory Screening Appointment

Many conditions cause memory issues, and early detection is essential for effective treatment, according to a national Alzheimer's disease organization.

The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) encourages people to get a memory screening in the new year.

The foundation offers free, confidential virtual memory screenings. It doesn't set a minimum age and there are no insurance pr...

Smokers More Prone to Memory Loss by Middle Age

If you need another reason to quit smoking, researchers have one: your mid-life brain health.

Not only does smoking harm lung and heart health, but it increases the chances of middle-aged memory loss and confusion, a new study shows.

The likelihood of mental ("cognitive") decline is lower for those who quit — even if they did so only recently, according to researchers at Ohio Sta...

Mood Swings, Memory Troubles: Minding the Mental Toll of Menopause

Menopause and the years before it may make you feel like you're losing your mind.

Some of those feelings are changes that occur naturally in this stage of life, but other factors contribute, too, according to the North American Menopause Society (NAMS), which offered tips to achieve some peace.

Changes in hormones are...

Exercise, Mindfulness May Not Boost Seniors' Thinking, Memory

Exercise and mindfulness are known for their health benefits, but a new study found that didn't extend to boosting memory or thinking skills in healthy seniors.

That doesn't mean these activities wouldn't be beneficial for memory if practiced for a longer period of time or in adults with impairments, the researchers noted, just that there were not apparent benefits during the study.

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Aerobic Exercise Reinvigorates the Aging Brain

Regular aerobic exercise improves blood flow to the brain, which should help keep seniors sharper as they age, a new trial has revealed.

At least a half-hour of power walking or jogging four to five times a week promoted better blood flow in and out of the brain among a small group of older adults, said study co-author

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 16, 2022
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  • Could 'Food Stamps' Program Give Memory a Boost?

    Signing up for "food stamps" might help lower-income seniors preserve their mental capabilities, a new U.S. study suggests.

    Researchers found that eligible older adults who used the government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — commonly called food stamps — had two fewer years of mental...

    What's Better for Your Brain, Crossword Puzzles or Computer Games?

    Older adults looking to slow down memory loss might find some help in a classic brain-teaser: the crossword puzzle.

    That's the suggestion of a small study that followed older adults with mild cognitive impairment — problems with memory and thinking that may progress to dementia over time. Researchers found that those randomly assigned to do crossword puzzles for 18 months showed a small...

    Get a Free Memory Screening From the Alzheimer's Foundation This November

    Early detection of memory issues is important.

    It can help rule in or out a variety of health issues, including vitamin deficiency, thyroid condition, sleep apnea, urinary tract infection and, of course, Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    The Alzheimer's Foundation of America suggests getting scr...

    Scientists Probe How Sleep Helps Create Lasting Memories

    It's a question many have asked: How are memories made to last?

    Now, a new study claims they are solidified during sleep through the interplay of two distinct brain regions.

    Memories are set in the brain as it cycles between slow-wave and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which happens about five times a night, re...

    1 in 10 U.S. Seniors Has Dementia; Minorities Hit Hardest

    One in 10 older Americans has dementia, and twice as many have mild mental impairment, a new study finds.

    As the nation's population grows older, the burden on families and society is likely to grow, and minorities will be affected most, experts say.

    "As the population in the U.S. ages, it is projected that there will be more cases of cognitive impairment, unless and until effective...

    Brain Secrets of the Super-Sharp 'Super-Agers'

    Researchers have discovered another clue as to how some older people stay sharp as a tack into their 80s and beyond: Their brain cells are really big.

    The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super-agers" — a select group of elderly adults who have the memory skills of people decades younger.

    The researchers found that in a memory-related area of the brain, super-agers ha...

    Over 7 Million U.S. Seniors Have Mental Declines That Threaten Financial Skills

    As Americans age, millions end up struggling with dementia or some level of memory impairment and diminished capacity to think clearly and make decisions.

    Yet a new study says that despite such serious challenges, many seniors continue to manage their own finances, often alone, and despite a...

    Mental Skills Slow With Age, But Seniors Gain in Other Ways: Study

    Seniors, there's good news and bad from a new study of mental health. The brain-centered research confirms that mental skills do decline with age -- but it also finds many people over 60 having better psychological health than folks in their 20s.

    "We wanted to better understand the interplay between cognition and mental health across aging, and whether they rely on activation of similar o...

    Music: Bridging Memories for People With Alzheimer's

    Wes Mika started out on drums, but in his heart he was a tambourine man.

    “He got fascinated by the little silver discs on the tambourine,” said his wife, Susan Mika. “Sometimes he would hit the tambourine with the little mallets of the drum. He just he loved that tambourine.”

    Wes, 77, has dementia and lives in a memory care facility in Arlington Heights, Ill., a northwest su...

    In Small Study, Hormone Boosts Thinking Skills in Men With Down Syndrome

    Men with Down syndrome may think and remember better when treated with a brain hormone normally associated with fertility, a new small-scale study suggests.

    Rhythmic drip doses of

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 1, 2022
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  • In Trial, Brain Zaps Gave Seniors a Month-Long Memory Boost

    If you're a senior who struggles to remember where you put your car keys, could noninvasive brain stimulation boost your memory?

    Yes, clai...

    Experiences of Racism Tied to Worsening Memory, Thinking in Older Black Americans

    Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and new research suggests that racism is a contributor.

    Experiences of structural, interpersonal and institutional

    Even a Drink a Day Might Raise Brain Risks

    Even moderate drinking may be related to higher iron levels in the brain - a potentially risky situation for memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among nearly 21,000 middle-aged and older adults, those who drank as little as a few beers a week sh...

    Post-Stroke Memory Loss Can Resolve for Some Patients

    Memory loss is a common symptom after a stroke, but there's hope for some that those memories could return.

    A new study from Norway examined 86 patients with relatively mild strokes and found many had improved mental functioning after 12 weeks.

    "Our study shows that around half of patients suffering a stroke had various forms of memory impairment one week after the stroke. But by t...

    Researchers Spot Sign of Alzheimer's Risk That Scammers Love

    Could the way a senior handles his or her money offer clues about their risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    Yes, according to a new study involving dozens of elderly men and women that found a higher likelihood to give away money to anonymous individuals correlated with a poorer ...

    Severe COVID May Age Survivors' Brains 20 Years: Study

    A serious bout of COVID-19 can prompt a serious loss of brain power, new research warns, triggering a drop in IQ that's equivalent to aging from 50 to 70 in a matter of months.

    "Previous research has indicated that people who have recovered from COVID-19 may suffer from lasting problems in terms of their ability to concentrate and problem solve," noted study author Adam Hampshire. He's an...

    Scientists Calculate Perfect Amount of Sleep for Folks Over 40

    Are you over 40 and wonder what the magic amount of sleep every night might be? A new study arrives at an answer.

    It turns out that seven hours of sleep a night may be the ideal amount for keeping your brain in good health if you're middle-aged or older.

    "Getting a good night's sleep is important at all st...

    Your Personality May Safeguard Your Aging Brain

    Certain personality traits may make older adults more or less vulnerable to waning memory and thinking skills, a new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 2,000 older adults, found that those high on the "conscientious" scale - organized, self-disciplined and productive - were less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. That refers to subtler problems with memory and other mental ski...

    Bruce Willis Stepping Down From Acting After Brain Disorder Diagnosis

    "Die Hard" star Bruce Willis is stepping away from acting following a recent diagnosis of aphasia, a disorder affecting the part of the brain responsible for language.

    Willis' ex-wife Demi Moore, current wife Emma Heming Willis and daughters announced his decision in an Instagram post Wednesday, noting that "he has bee...

    Memory Issues Plague Long COVID Patients

    Memory and concentration problems haunt 7 in 10 patients with long COVID, a pair of new studies indicate.

    The findings suggest that COVID-19 has a notable impact on brain health, even if the precise underlying mechanisms remain unclear, B...

    Is It 'Pre-Alzheimer's' or Normal Aging? Poll Finds Many Americans Unclear

    You regularly can't remember where you left your phone or your book. You keep missing appointments. You often lose your train of thought during conversation.

    Many older folks shrug off these instances as so-called "senior moments" -- but experts say this isn't typically part of normal aging.

    Instead, these are signs of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a stage that exists between the...

    Getting Active Can Keep Those 'Senior Moments' at Bay

    Want to preserve all those precious memories, including your first kiss and how you felt the first time you got behind the wheel of a car?

    If you do, start moving: New research shows that when sedentary older adults started to exercise, they showed improvements in episodic memory, or the ability to vividly recall meaningful moments and events.

    These benefits were most pronounced amo...

    Human Brain Doesn't Slow Down Until After 60

    You used to be able to make snap judgments in your 20s, but now it feels like you take a lot longer to react to questions, decisions and challenges put before you.

    Don't fret, it's not that you're losing brain power.

    Your response time does tend to slow down as you age, but a new study argues that's not because your brain's processing speed is deteriorating.

    Your brain remains...