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Results for search "Media".

04 Mar

Social Media and Junk Food Habits

Social media influencers promoting unhealthy snacks may increase kids' junk food intake.

15 Nov

Is Social Media Harmful to the Well-Being of Young Adults?

There may be significant benefits to limiting social media use.

Health News Results - 63

Too Much Social Media a Depression Risk for Teens

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too much social media might be too much for the mental well-being of teenagers, new research suggests.

The more that teens used social media and watched television, the greater their risk of depression, the study found.

"Our research reveals that increased time spent using some forms of digital media in a given year predicts depressi...

Addicted to Video Games? This Treatment Might Help

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Know someone who just can't put down the controller in the middle of online games like Fortnite or League of Legends?

German researchers think they've developed a way to help break the compulsive habit.

In a new study, the research team reported that they've developed a short-term type of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to tre...

Social Media a Big Driver of Teen Vaping Craze: Study

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Social media is helping spur the e-cigarette epidemic among America's teens, a new study suggests.

Nearly 15,000 Instagram posts related to Juul, the most popular e-cigarette brand, were released between March and May 2018, researchers found.

More than half the posts focused on youth culture or lifestyle-related content that would ap...

Selfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You might be more apt to seek out a face-lift, a new nose, hair implants or a boob job if you're a fan of posting selfies on social media, a new study reports.

Adults who regularly use social media are more likely to consider getting plastic surgery to improve their online appearance, particularly if they prefer photo-heavy sites and apps, t...

Just How Harmful Is TV for Your Health?

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cautions about TV viewing are as old as television itself, but how bad is it really?

A number of studies cite health risks due to the link between a sedentary lifestyle and the number of hours spent watching the tube.

Young adults who watch three or more hours of TV a day and get little exercise have a greater chance of cognitive is...

Instagram 'Self-Harm' Posts Give Rise to Copycat Behavior

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being an Instagram influencer isn't always a good thing. New research found that vulnerable young people who see online posts of self-harm -- like cutting -- may copy those destructive behaviors.

Almost one-third of teens and young adults who reported seeing self-harm posts on Instagram said they had performed the same or similar self-harming...

TV Not a Good Sleep Aid for Young Kids

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents think that watching TV helps their young children fall asleep, but new research finds the opposite is true.

Researchers looked at 470 children aged 3 to 5 in Massachusetts and found that those who watched less than one hour of TV per day got 22 more minutes of sleep at night -- nearly 2.5 more hours per week -- than those who watch...

Millennials Believe 'Narcissist' Label, But Don't Like It

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young Americans tend to accept the popular notion that their generation is self-centered and entitled, but they also resent those labels, new research suggests.

In a series of surveys, researchers found that most people -- regardless of age -- believed the narcissistic stereotype often assigned to millennials and Generation Z.

Youn...

Americans Sitting More Than Ever, and Tech Is to Blame

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- America's couch potatoes are becoming ever more deeply rooted, and computers are the reason why.

The amount of time people spend sitting around has increased in recent years, driven largely by more leisure time spent with a computer, federal survey data shows.

Total daily sitting time increased about an hour a day for teenagers an...

Celebrity 'Fat-Shaming' Affects All Women, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You've probably seen headlines screaming that a favorite star is packing on the pounds. Tyra Banks, Jessica Simpson, Jennifer Lawrence -- no matter how thin, no celebrity seems immune from "fat-shaming."

Now, research shows the trend could have a ripple effect, making the non-famous feel bad about their bodies, too.

"Fat-shaming is ...

Is Your Smartphone Making You Fat?

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mindlessly switching from your smartphone to other media devices and back again might lead to added pounds, scientists say.

A small, new study found that heavy-duty media multitaskers also tended to be heavier, weight-wise.

It's possible that these devices are actually changing the brain, theorized lead author Richard Lopez, a p...

Eye-Soothing Tips for Computer Users

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screens: They're at work, at home and even in the palm of your hand. But stare too long at them and your eyes -- and mind -- could pay a price, experts warn.

For example, too much screen time can lead to problems such as eye strain, dry eye, headaches and insomnia, the American Academy of Ophthalmology warns.

"Eyestrain can be fr...

Nix That TV in Your 4-Year-Old's Bedroom

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

Preschoolers who had a TV in their bedroom were at increased risk for poor eating habits, overweight/obesity and social/emotional struggles in their teens, Canadian researchers say.

"The early years are a critical period in a child's...

Mental Health Woes Are Rising in Young Americans -- Is Social Media to Blame?

THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young Americans may be more vulnerable to depression, distress and suicidal thoughts or attempts than their parents' generation, and social media might be fueling that troubling trend.

So claims a review of a decade's worth of data on roughly 200,000 teens between the ages of 12 and 17, and 400,000 young adults over 18.

Investigat...

Too Much TV Might Dull the Aging Brain

THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The old saying, "TV rots your brain," could have some validity for folks as they age.

In a new study, middle-aged people who watched television for more than 3.5 hours a day experienced a decline in their ability to remember words and language over the next six years, British researchers found.

What's worse, it appears that the mor...

Painless Ways to Limit Your Kids' Screen Time

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're in a frequent tug of war with your kids over turning off their gadgets, it could be the tactic you use when you try to persuade them to disengage.

It turns out that giving 1- to 5-year-olds a time warning that screen viewing is about to end makes the transition away from a tablet, smartphone TV or other device more painful, accor...

Taking a Bite Out of Food Ads Targeted to Kids

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids can be as strongly influenced by TV commercials as by the shows themselves, and many studies have found that tempting food ads have a particularly harmful effect, contributing to childhood obesity.

While the government has stepped in with nutrition guidelines for manufacturers, these are largely voluntary and, therefore, not enforceable....

Screen Time for the Very Young Has Doubled in 20 Years: Study

TUESDAY, Feb. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The electronic babysitter is alive and thriving in the new digital age.

A new study says it all: Children under the age of 2 spend twice the amount of time in front of a screen each day -- almost three hours, to be exact -- as they did 20 years ago.

Kids are being exposed to far more screen time than recommended by pediatric experts...

Does Social Media Push Teens to Depression? New Study Says No

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook probably isn't driving teenagers to depression, a new study contends.

In fact, Canadian researchers found the relationship worked in the opposite direction -- teenage girls who were already depressed tended to spend more time on social media, to try to feel better.

These findings run count...

The Reality of Watching Reality TV

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to analyzing the effects of watching reality TV, well, it's complicated. While some see these shows as a brief escape from daily life, they can have negative effects on some viewers, including impressionable teens.

Researchers asked 1,100 girls aged 11 to 17 about their viewing habits. On the one hand, watching reality TV was ti...

Too Much TV Raises Women's Odds for Early-Onset Colon Cancer: Study

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Binge-watching series after series might be fun, but too much TV could raise a middle-aged woman's odds for colon cancer, a new study finds.

Reporting Feb. 5 in JNCI Cancer Spectrum, researchers tracked data for more than 89,000 U.S. women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study.

The investigators found 118 cases of "young-onset"...

Almost All U.S. Teens Falling Short on Sleep, Exercise

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too little sleep. Not enough exercise. Far too much "screen time."

That is the unhealthy lifestyle of nearly all U.S. high school students, new research finds.

The study, of almost 60,000 teenagers nationwide, found that only 5 percent were meeting experts' recommendations on three critical health habits: sleep; exercise; and time sp...

Too Much Screen Time a Damper on Child's Development

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young children spend a lot of time fiddling with smartphones, tapping away at tablets and staring at TV screens.

Could this time be taking away from their early physical and mental development?

A new study argues that's precisely the case -- screen time can affect how well children perform on developmental tests.

"Kids who...

Movie Violence Doesn't Make Kids Violent, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents often worry that violent movies can trigger violence in their kids, but a new study suggests PG-13-rated movies won't turn your kids into criminals.

Researchers found that as PG-13 movies became more violent between 1985 and 2015, overall rates of murder and violence actually fell.

"It doesn't appear that PG-13-rated movies ...

Are TV Cereal Ads Making Your Kids Fat?

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal TV ads aimed at young children put them at increased risk for obesity and cancer, researchers warn.

A poor diet, including too much sugar, can lead to obesity, a known risk factor for 13 cancers.

"One factor believed to contribute to children's poor quality diets is the marketing of nutritionally poor foods directly to childr...

A Slam Dunk: Late-Night Tweets Harm NBA Players' Performance

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Late-night tweeting leads to poorer next-day performance by professional basketball players, according to a new study that highlights how social media can affect sleep.

For the study, researchers examined statistics for games played between 2009 and 2016 by 112 National Basketball Association players who were verified Twitter users.

...

All That Social Media May Boost Loneliness, Not Banish It

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain.

Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness.

So concludes a small analysis that tracked the impact such sites had on...

Guns End More Lives by Suicide Than Murder

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Shootings make the headlines, yet the American public doesn't know that guns take more lives by suicide than by homicide, a new study reveals.

In the United States, suicide is twice as common as murder, and suicide by firearm is more common than homicide by firearm, the researchers reported.

However, the new "research indicates that ...

Can Too Much Screen Time Dumb Down Your Kid?

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're worried that too much "screen time" could be sapping your child's intelligence, new research suggests you might be right.

Kids with the sharpest intellects spent less than two hours a day on their cellphones, tablets and computers, coupled with 9 to 11 hours of sleep and at least an hour of physical activity, the study found.

...

Kids' Play Is Healthy, Pediatricians' Group Says

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Play is a child's most important work, preschool teachers like to say, and a new American Academy of Pediatrics report wholeheartedly agrees.

Play is a crucial way for kids to develop social and mental skills, head off stress and build a healthy bond with parents, the child health experts say.

"We're recommending that doctors write ...

Dining Out With Smartphones Isn't Appetizing

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Keeping that smartphone handy while out with friends may backfire: The pull of digital technology is distracting and drains enjoyment out of face-to-face interactions, new research suggests.

A pair of studies focused on cellphone use showed those who keep their phones easily accessible while eating out feel more preoccupied and bored -- and en...

Frequent Sexting Can Weaken Committed Relationships

FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Sexting can lead to dissing.

That appears to be one takeaway from a small survey of North American adults in committed relationships who share explicit visuals and/or texts via mobile phones with each other.

While the survey suggests that some couples who engage in sexting do see improvements in their real-world sex life, the virtual...

Snap, Polish, Post: Why Selfies May Be Bad for Your Health

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Photo-editing tools that make people look more perfect online than in real life may be a health threat, medical experts warn.

The tidal wave of altered photos on social media is changing perceptions of beauty. And that can trigger a preoccupation with appearance that leads to risky efforts to hide perceived flaws, researchers suggest. Those ef...

Too Much Screen Time May Pile on the Pounds

MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, making it more likely they'll become overweight or obese, a new review claims.

The average 8- to 18-year-old spends more than seven hours a day fixated on a screen, whether it's a computer, smartphone, tablet, video game or TV, the latest evidence shows.

Teenagers who exceed t...

Media Reports of Celeb Suicides May Trigger 'Copycat' Tragedies

MONDAY, July 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- News reports on suicides may be quickly followed by a bump in suicide rates -- especially if they contain details that sensationalize the tragedy, a new study finds.

The research adds to evidence of a phenomenon known as "suicide contagion." It happens when vulnerable people identify with a person who died by suicide, and then see that route a...

Using Smartphones During Lectures = Lower Grades

FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- College students might want to leave their smartphones and tablets behind when they head to a lecture, new research suggests.

Otherwise, the distraction might translate into a lower grade on the final exam.

For the study, researchers followed 118 cognitive psychology students at Rutgers University in New Jersey. For one term, electro...

Smartphone-Obsessed Parents May Mean Cranky Kids

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who take refuge in their smartphones when their kids throw a tantrum may, in the long run, make matters worse, a new study suggests.

The study, of 183 couples with young children, found that stressed-out parents often turned to their electronic devices when dealing with their kids. And when that was a pattern, their kids' behavior t...

Snubbed on Social Media? Your Depression Risk May Rise

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Unsettling experiences on social media may leave you feeling more than just anti-social -- they might raise your risk for depression, new research suggests.

Curiously, the reverse doesn't seem to be true. The survey of nearly 1,200 college students indicated that a positive online exchange only marginally reduced depression risk.

...

Leave Tablets, Smartphones Out of the Bedroom for Better Sleep

FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Are tablets, smartphones and laptops robbing Americans of shut-eye? Absolutely, said researchers who found that the unending entertainments and the light the devices emit are a powerful, slumber-killing combo.

The finding comes from a small analysis of nine otherwise healthy adults in their 20s. Their sleep was tracked after five straight nigh...

Medical Marijuana Ads May Spur Teen Pot Use

THURSDAY, May 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who watch more medical marijuana ads are more likely to smoke pot themselves, new research indicates.

"Our findings suggest that increased exposure to medical marijuana advertising is associated with increased marijuana use and related negative consequences throughout adolescence," said study lead author Elizabeth D'Amico, of the RAND C...

Parents More Lenient If PG-13 Movie Violence 'Justified'

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are more likely to let their kids see violent PG-13 movies if they feel the mayhem is "justified," a new study suggests.

The study, of 610 U.S. parents, found that moms and dads were less disturbed by gun violence in PG-13 movies when they deemed it justified. That included the typical action-movie scenario where a hero defends others f...

Too Much Social Media May Harm a Woman's Body Image

FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest may not be good for women's self-esteem, a new study suggests.

Women are less likely to be happy with their bodies if they spend more than an hour a day on social media, the findings showed.

These women tend to think thin people are more attractive, and may be more self-conscious about how they themse...

Posting Your Vacation Online May Make You Forget It

FRIDAY, April 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past decade, smartphones and social media have blanketed the planet like a technological tsunami.

The result is that nearly 70 million new photos and 5 billion new posts are uploaded to Instagram and Facebook every day, respectively.

But a new study suggests that constantly sharing the moments of your life online may underm...

Did 2016 Election Unleash OCD in the USA?

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's little doubt that the last presidential election sparked a host of emotions among Americans. But new research suggests it might also have triggered obsessive-compulsive behaviors in Democrats and Republicans alike.

"The idea for our study came about while I was taking a break from a group project. During the break, everyone pulled ...

Sports 'Sponsorships' Hawk Junk Food to Kids

MONDAY, March 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Far from trying to keep kids fit and trim, America's biggest sports leagues are actually pushing junk food at them, a new study contends.

Multimillion dollar "sponsorships" forged between professional sports organizations -- like the National Football League -- and food companies often end up marketing high-calorie foods and sugary beverages ...

Violence Trailed Trump's Campaign

FRIDAY, March 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Violence followed Donald Trump during his presidential campaign, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed police data for 31 Trump rallies in 22 cities and 38 Hillary Clinton rallies in 21 cities in 2016. All of the cities had populations of more than 200,000.

On days when Trump rallies were held, cities had 2.3 more assaults than av...

Why 'False News' Spreads Faster Than Truth

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Amid growing concerns about the impact of "fake news," a new study finds that false stories take off much faster than truth on Twitter.

The study, of news and rumors shared by 3 million Twitter users, found that false information spreads more quickly and further than accurate information.

Falsities were about 70 percent more likely...

Socializing Is More Fun Without This Distraction

THURSDAY, March 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're out for a good time, think twice about pulling out your smartphone.

Smartphones can making dining out less appetizing, a recent study revealed. And a second experiment found that people get less pleasure from face-to-face socializing if they are using their mobile device.

The findings add to growing research into how smar...

Too Much TV Could Boost Your Odds for a Blood Clot

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hours spent binge-watching that hot new series might feel great, but it's doing no favors for your blood vessels, new research shows.

The study found that people who spend too much time in front of the TV are at increased risk for blood clots in their veins -- a condition called venous thromboembolism (VTE).

These clots, which oft...

Sleepy U.S. Teens Are Running on Empty

THURSDAY, Jan. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most American teenagers are plagued by too little sleep, which can hurt their health and their school performance, federal health officials said Thursday.

Nearly 58 percent of middle school students in nine states and almost 73 percent of high school students across the country don't get the recommended amount of nightly shuteye, according t...

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