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Fertility Treatments Might Affect Kids' Growth, But Not for Long

The growth patterns of kids born through fertility treatment differ initially from those conceived naturally, but those growth rates do catch up over time, a new study finds.

In-vitro fertilization and other forms of "assisted reproductive technology" (ART) has long been associated with lower birth weights in babies, but it wasn't clear how long differences in growth continue.

To fi...

Fresh Embryos Beat Frozen for IVF: Study

When it comes to in vitro fertilization, new research suggests fresh is best.

In the study, researchers analyzed data from 33,000 women who received fresh or frozen embryos derived from freshly retrieved donor eggs.

The data was from 370 in vitro fertilization clinics in the United States that account for more than 95% of all assisted reproduction nationwide.

Women who receive...

Pot Might Impair a Woman's Fertility: Study

Though using marijuana for medical or recreational reasons is legal in a growing number of U.S. states, it may come with some unexpected side effects.

A new study found that women who use cannabis may be reducing their fertility.

"Cannabis use has continued to climb. More and more states have legalized it in recent years," said Sunni Mumford, an investigator at the U.S. National In...

Vasectomy Reversal Just as Successful in Men Over 50

Vasectomy reversal is as viable in men over 50 as in those who are younger, a new study says.

About 20% of American men who have a vasectomy want to father children in the future, and about 6% will seek a vasectomy reversal, previous research shows.

However, it's been unclear how a man's age may affect his chance for a successful reversal.

To find out, researchers analyzed the...

Heart Disease Is World's No. 1 Killer

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide -- accounting for one-third of deaths in 2019 -- and the death toll continues to rise, a new paper says.

China had the highest number of heart disease deaths last year, followed by India, Russia, the United States and Indonesia. Heart disease death rates were lowest in France, Peru and Japan, where rates were six times lower than in 19...

Many Breast Cancer Survivors Have Healthy Babies: Study

When a young woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, many questions go through her mind.

What treatments does she need? Will she survive? And will she still be able to have a baby?

In a review of recent research, an international team of investigators say the answer to that critical third question is yes. Though breast cancer survivors are less likely to become pregnant than the ave...

Frozen Eggs Help Breast Cancer Survivors Conceive

Freezing their eggs or ovarian tissue before breast cancer treatment increases survivors' chances of having children after recovery, a new study finds.

Nearly 10% of breast cancer cases occur in women younger than 45 years of age, some of whom haven't yet had children, according to researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

Treatment often includes chemotherapy, which can da...

IVF Won't Raise Ovarian Cancer Risk: Study

Fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization don't appear to increase a woman's risk of ovarian cancer, a new study finds.

Previous studies suggested that women who used this assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as IVF to get pregnant may be at risk for ovarian cancer and non-malignant borderline tumors, due to increased levels of sex hormones needed to stimulate egg produ...

Odds of Pregnancy in IVF Same With Frozen or Fresh Embryos: Study

Whether a frozen or fresh embryo is transferred during fertility treatments, the odds of pregnancy are roughly the same, according to a new Danish study involving nearly 500 women.

Fresh embryo transfer, however, should still be the gold standard in assisted reproduction for women, the research team said.

There was one exception to that rule, however: Women who are at ri...

A New 'Spin' on How Sperm Swim

If you ever had a sex-ed class in school, you have probably seen a visual of sperm swimming with a wagging tail. Now, high-tech tools have shattered that view of how sperm move.

More than 300 years ago, a Dutch scientist used an early microscope to observe human sperm in motion. He saw that they appeared to swim using a tail that moved from one side to the other.

But scient...

What's the Best 'Uterine-Sparing' Treatment for Fibroids?

Two "uterine-sparing" treatments for fibroids can improve women's quality of life -- though one might be more effective than the other, a new clinical trial suggests.

Fibroids are non-cancerous growths in and around the wall of the uterus that are usually harmless. But when they cause significant problems, like persistent pain and heavy menstrual bleeding, treatment may be necessary.<...

Changes in IVF May Have Spurred Drop in Cerebral Palsy, Study Says

Rates of cerebral palsy among babies in Nordic countries born through in vitro fertilization (IVF) have fallen by more than half over the past two decades, due to fewer twin births from IVF, according to a new study.

A study in Denmark 15 years ago found a significantly increased risk of cerebral palsy in infants born through IVF. The absolute risk was small, but cerebral palsy was th...

Shorter Storage of Frozen Embryos Tied to Pregnancy Success: Study

Vitrification is a safe way to freeze and store embryos during fertility treatment, but the longer embryos are stored, the less likely women are to get pregnant and have a live birth, a new study from China suggests.

In vitrification, embryos are briefly placed in a dehydrating solution, then fast-frozen to prevent damaging ice crystals from forming.

Some experts feared the ...

A Woman's Egg May Prefer One Man's Sperm Over Another's: Study

People have certain qualities they look for in a mate, and now a new study finds that a woman's eggs may be choosy about sperm, too.

Researchers said the findings offer new insight into human reproduction -- showing that eggs will not accept just any sperm, and actually have more say in the union than previously recognized.

In the moments just before fertilization, there is ...

What Are Your Chances of Having a Second IVF Baby?

If you've had one baby through fertility treatment, your chances for a second success are good, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 35,000 women in Australia and New Zealand who had a live baby after in vitro fertilization (IVF).

The women were treated between 2009 and 2013 and followed to 2015. Live births up to October 2016 were included in the ...

Can Men Dine Their Way to Higher Sperm Counts?

Listen up, guys: A healthy diet is good for your brain and heart, and also your sperm, new research suggests.

In a study of more than 2,900 Danish men, median age 19, those whose diet was rich in fish, chicken, vegetables, fruit and water had higher sperm counts than those who ate a "Western" diet rich in pizza, French fries, processed and red meats, snacks, refined grains, sugary be...

First Baby Born From Use of Lab-Matured Frozen Egg

In what doctors call a breakthrough, a cancer patient in France gave birth to the first baby conceived from an immature egg that was matured in the laboratory, frozen, then later thawed and fertilized.

"We were delighted that the patient became pregnant without any difficulty and successfully delivered a healthy baby at term," said team leader Michaël Grynberg, head of reproduct...

Fresh Donor Egg Better Than Frozen for IVF: Study

Fresh donated eggs appear to be better for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) than frozen ones, a new study suggests.

Donor eggs provide the best chance of success for many women undergoing IVF, according to the authors.

But it wasn't clear whether using fresh or frozen donor eggs in IVF improves the chances of success, so a team from the University of Colorado and Duke University...

Allow Dead Men to Be Sperm Donors, Medical Ethicists Say

Should a dying man be allowed to let doctors harvest his sperm for possible use by strangers after death? Yes, say two medical ethicists in the United Kingdom.

Writing in an article published Jan. 20 in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Drs. Nathan Hodson and Joshua Parker said that such donations would be akin to the organ donor process.

"If it is morally acceptable th...

Fish Oil Supplements Might Help Men Become Dads

Couples struggling to get pregnant might want to add a little more fish in their diet, a new study says.

Young men who take fish oil supplements appear to have better sperm quality and higher testosterone levels than those who don't, as well as larger testicles, researchers report.

Although it wasn't tested as part of the study, all these male reproductive factors should lea...

Male Fertility Supplements Fail to Deliver

Supplements containing zinc and folic acid don't appear to boost male fertility, a new study finds.

Despite marketing claims, these supplements don't improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts or sperm function, researchers say.

"Our results suggest that these dietary supplements have little to no effect on fertility and may even cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms," researche...

'Designer Babies' a Long Way Off

"Designer babies" aren't going to be a reality anytime soon, researchers say.

Concerns about genetically altering embryos to have desired traits have been around nearly as long as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and the technology to screen embryos have existed.

But while recent live births resulting from embryonic CRISPR gene editing have re-focused attention on the issue, the...

Chlamydia Can Harm Male Fertility

Undiagnosed chlamydia infection can harm male fertility, a new study suggests.

"Chlamydia infection has been associated with women's infertility but much less is known about its impact on male infertility, particularly if men do not experience symptoms, which is estimated to be in about 50% of cases," said study leader Ken Beagley, a professor of immunology at Queensland Universit...

Twins Are Becoming Less Common in U.S., for Good Reasons

No, you're not seeing double as often these days: After decades of rising, twin births are declining in the United States.

Twin birth rates had been on the rise for 30 years, but dropped 4% between 2014 and 2018, health officials said in a new U.S. government study. That's the lowest level in more than a decade. In 2018, there were 32.6 twins for every 1,000 U.S. births.

Link Seen Between Infertility, Prostate Cancer

Could male infertility contribute to a higher risk for prostate cancer?

Yes, according to new Swedish research that suggests that men who become fathers through assisted reproduction treatments may be more likely to develop prostate cancer in midlife.

The conclusion follows a review of data collected by a Swedish national registry between 1994 and 2014. In all, 1 million chi...

Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Kids

Many people wait until they're older to have children, and that decision can raise the risk of problems like infertility and genetic abnormalities. But new research suggests there may be at least one benefit to having children later in life.

The study found that kids with at least one older parent were less likely to be defiant rule-breakers or physically aggressive.

"Older...

In a U.S. First, Baby Is Delivered From Womb Transplanted From Deceased Donor

Doctors at the Cleveland Clinic announced that they've achieved a first in North America: delivering a baby from a uterus that had been transplanted from a deceased donor.

The healthy baby girl was delivered by C-section in June. This is only the second time such a delivery has happened worldwide, the first having occurred in Brazil in December.

"We couldn't have asked for a...

When It Comes to Treating Infertility, Race, Education and Income Matter

If you struggle with infertility, chances are you will be twice as likely to get treatment for the heartbreaking condition if you are white, college-educated or affluent.

So claims a new study that analyzed data from more than 2,500 women aged 20 to 44 who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2013 and 2016.

Nearly 12.5% of the wo...

Sperm Seems to Survive Just Fine in Space, Study Shows

The reality of humans getting reproductive help in space just got a little bit closer.

Scientists in Spain report frozen sperm samples subjected to space-like gravity conditions were as viable as those that remained on Earth, a finding that could eventually lead to sperm banks in space.

The results "open the possibility of safely transporting [sperm] to space and considerin...

Fertility Treatment Tied to Deadly Heart Problem in Pregnancy: Study

The risk of a pregnancy-related type of heart failure is five times higher for women who undergo fertility treatment than those who conceive naturally, a new study says.

The condition is called peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). It affects about 1 in 1,000 pregnant women worldwide and is life-threatening to the mother and baby.

This study included 111 women with PPCM and was ...

Older Dads' Sperm Isn't What It Used to Be

Just because a guy can make babies later in life doesn't mean it's risk-free.

The partners and children of men who become fathers at an older age are at increased risk for health problems, a new study finds.

"While it is widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the health of the child, most men do not realiz...

What Couples Considering IVF Need to Know

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is widely used in the United States to help infertile couples have children. But there are a number of things people should know when considering it, an infertility specialist says.

"Many factors … can affect the success of an IVF cycle, but many people view IVF as their safety net that ensures they can have a child anytime," said Dr. Rashmi Kudesia...

Male-Hormone Gene May Help Cause Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a common cause of infertility and type 2 diabetes, but little is known about its origins. Now, new research suggests a gene involved in male hormone production plays a big role in the disorder's development.

"We're starting to make headway on what causes PCOS [polycystic ovary syndrome]. It's very frustrating for patients because it's poorly understood," ...

Gender Pay Gap Significant Among Infertility Doctors

In the medical world of baby-making, males rule.

A new study finds that female obstetrician-gynecologists who specialize in reproductive endocrinology and infertility get paid far less than their male colleagues.

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus note that far more women than men go into obstetrics-gynecology in the United States, but women ma...

Supplemental Steroids, Testosterone May Lower Men's Sperm Counts

Men who abuse hormones such as testosterone or steroids for bodybuilding can have declines in sperm and testosterone production, researchers say.

The good news: these changes seem to reverse once men stop hormone overuse.

While the use of nonprescribed male hormones (androgens) has surged in many wealthy countries, there has been little research into their effect on men's r...

Opioid Overuse Can Lower Hormones to Harmful Levels

Add one more issue to the growing list of harms from opioid abuse: Long-term use may lead to hormone deficiencies that affect a man's health.

Researchers reviewed the latest medical evidence and found that about two-thirds of men using opioids for more than six months develop hypogonadism, which is insufficient testosterone production.

The review also found that about one in...

Science Finds a Way for Transgender Males to Maintain Fertility

People transitioning female to male face issues around future fertility. But new research suggests children in the future are a real possibility for these transgender men.

Now, research shows that transgender men can remain fertile after even one year of testosterone treatment.

It's common for transgender men -- those who were born female but who i...

Baby Monkey May Offer Hope to Preserving Fertility of Kids With Cancer

She's cute, and perhaps a medical breakthrough.

Scientists say they have used frozen testicular tissue to achieve the birth of a healthy baby monkey named Grady -- a success they hope to eventually translate to childhood cancer survivors whose treatment has left them infertile.

Infertility is a potential side effect of the chemotherapy and radiation used to treat various can...

Common Household Chemicals Harm Sperm in Both Men and Dogs

Two chemicals found in household products and food could harm male fertility in both dogs and people, U.K. researchers say.

The chemicals are the plasticizer DEHP -- used in products such as carpets, flooring, upholstery, clothes, wires and toys -- and the industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (PCB153). Even though it is banned worldwide, PCB153 is still widely present in t...

For Future Offspring, Docs Save Eggs From Teen Transitioning Female-to-Male

You're a 14-year-old transgender boy who has opted to block normal female puberty before it can begin.

What happens if you and your parents decide to preserve some of your eggs, in case you want to have children later in life?

In this real-life case, doctors were able to retrieve and freeze four viable eggs from the patient, who was born a girl, but identified as male. The f...

Testicular Cancer Treatment Doesn't Always Doom Fertility

Young men diagnosed with testicular cancer often worry that treating the disease may jeopardize their chances of having children, but new research should ease their minds.

In the study, sperm counts rebounded in men who received one course of chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery for early-stage testicular cancer.

It was known that several rounds of chemotherapy or...

Female Anatomy May Play Big Role in Sperm's Success

In the race to conception, the female body is set up to separate weak sperm from strong, researchers report.

A woman's reproductive system presents a veritable obstacle course that stress-tests sperm, making sure that only the strongest swimmers have a chance of reaching a woman's egg, according to a new study.

Narrow gate-like passages within the female reproductive tract ...

Fertility Treatments Don't Raise Cancer Risk for Offspring

All expectant parents worry, and for those undergoing fertility treatments, there are additional concerns about the health of their child.

But a new study finds one less thing they need to stress over -- their children don't appear to be at greater risk of cancer than other children.

"These results provide reassuring evidence that children conceived as a result of fertility ...

Could a Little Pot Smoking Actually Raise Men's Fertility?

Forget the mellow slacker image -- pot smoking might actually make men more potent.

Men who've smoked marijuana appear to have significantly higher sperm concentrations than those who've never given it a try, a new study reports.

There's also a potential link between pot use and testosterone, said senior researcher Dr. Jorge Chavarro. He's an associate professor of nutrition...

Fertility Treatments Tied to Higher Odds for Pregnancy Complications

Women who've had fertility treatments -- especially in vitro fertilization -- may be at higher risk for serious pregnancy complications, a new study suggests.

Still, it's not clear if the treatments cause the hike in risk, and the benefits of IVF far outweigh any obstetric dangers, the study's Canadian authors said.

"It is important to remember that the absolute number of wo...

Uterus 'Scratching' Technique Won't Boost Fertility Treatment Success

An add-on procedure sometimes used before in-vitro fertilization won't increase a couple's chances of having a baby, according to a new study.

The technique is called endometrial scratching. A thin plastic tube is inserted into the uterus through the cervix and a small sample of tissue is taken from the lining of the uterus (endometrium).

"It was thought that the action of...

IVF Won't Cause Birth Complications: Study

"Test tube" babies are more likely to be premature and have a low birth weight, but it's unlikely that assisted reproductive technology is the reason why, researchers say.

Their findings challenge the widely held belief that procedures such as freezing embryos, the delayed fertilization of eggs and hormonal treatments lead to these problems.

"These findings will reassure pr...

Cancer Diagnosis May Quadruple Suicide Risk

The risk of suicide is more than four times higher among Americans with cancer than those without the disease, a new study finds.

"Even though cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, most cancer patients do not die from cancer, the patients usually die of another cause," said researcher Nicholas Zaorsky, a radiation oncologist in the Penn State Cancer Instit...

AHA: Why Do IVF Pregnancies With Frozen Embryos Raise Preeclampsia Risk?

For women who use in vitro fertilization to get pregnant, particularly those who find success with frozen embryo transfers, recent studies have found they have an increased risk of preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication and serious blood pressure condition.

Now, academic researchers may have uncovered why.

"Many have reported this higher incidence of preeclampsia in those...

Faulty Sperm May Explain Recurring Miscarriages

A series of miscarriages may signal that a man's sperm is not up to par, new British research suggests.

The findings could lead to new treatments to reduce the risk of miscarriage, said researchers at Imperial College London.

"Traditionally, doctors have focused attention on women when looking for the causes of recurrent miscarriage. The men's health, and the health of their...