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Health News Results - 179

New Clues to How Inflammation in Young Children's Brains Might Spur Autism

Severe inflammation very early in childhood might hamper the development of key brain cells, perhaps setting the stage for conditions such as autism or schizophrenia, new research suggests.

The origins of many neurodevelopment disorders remain mysterious. But the new study of postmortem brain tissue from children who died between the ages 1 and 5 shows how inflammation affects brain cells...

Ginger May Ease Inflammation of Autoimmune Diseases

Ginger supplements may help those with certain autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, control inflammation.

New research has added evidence to support the impact of ginger on white blood cell function, particularly a type of cell called a neutrophil.

The researchers were particularly interested in neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, also called NETos...

Using Meds to Manage Your Arthritis Pain: An Overview

Millions of Americans suffer from arthritis, and many reach for medication to ease their joint pain and inflammation.

The options might seem overwhelming, though. Here, the Arthritis Foundation offers some suggestions for meds that can be purchased at a local drug store or filled with a doctor's prescription, whether your pain is caused by normal wear and tear (osteoarthritis) or inflamma...

A New Treatment Option for a Form of Sudden Hair Loss

A new type of medication, JAK inhibitors, can effectively treat moderate to severe alopecia areata, a hair loss condition that has been historically hard to treat.

A study of its effectiveness, by Dr. Brett King and Dr. Brittany Craiglo...

Link Seen Between Inflammation, Alzheimer's

Researchers around the world are working to tease out the mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. Now, a new study points to so-called systemic inflammation.

British researchers found that inflammation -- activation of the body's innate immune system -- is associated with a small but statistically significant later risk of dementia. They reported their findings...

Low-Dose Colchicine Might Prevent or Delay Knee, Hip Replacements

An anti-inflammatory drug that has been around for over 2,000 years might help delay a very modern problem: hip and knee replacements.

That's the suggestion of a new study finding that older adults who used the drug — called colchicine — were less likely to need hip or knee replacement surgery over the next two years, versus those given placebo pills.

The study, published May 30...

Obesity Can Raise Odds for Post-Surgical Complications

Here's one more reason to watch your weight: Obesity can increase your odds for serious complications after surgery.

Compared with patients of normal weight, those who are obese are at greater risk for developing blood clots, infections and kidney failure after surgery, a new study reports. Pa...

Science Reveals Cause of Rare Heart Trouble in Young Men Who Get COVID Vaccines

Researchers think they've figured out why the COVID vaccine causes heart inflammation in an extremely small number of teenage boys — and what might be done to avoid it.

The second dose of COVID vaccine appears to promote a severe inflammatory response in these teens, setting off a cascade of events that causes myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), the researchers reported.

...

New Drug May Treat Rare Diseases That Make Exposure to Sunlight Painful

It sounds like the stuff of a vampire novel, but for people with a group of rare genetic disorders, exposure to sunlight can cause excruciating pain.

Now, an experimental medication is showing promise for helping them better tolerate the light of day.

In an early clinical trial, researchers tested the drug for patients with either of two related conditions: erythropoietic protoporp...

Celiac Disease Could Raise Heart Risks, Study Finds

People with celiac disease may be more likely to develop heart disease despite having fewer traditional heart risks than other folks.

Celiac disease is an immune reaction that occurs when some people eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The only treatment is following a strict gluten-free diet.

People with celiac disease may be 27% more likely to develop heart disea...

Chronic Pancreatitis: Surgery Can Help, But Healthy Lifestyle Is Key

Many people who have surgery for chronic pancreatitis continue to have health struggles in the years afterward — with some dying at a young age, a new study finds.

The study, done at one U.S. medical center, is the largest to look at overall survival in th...

COVID Vaccine Is Safe for Kids Who Got Rare Complication of COVID Illness

It's safe for kids to take the COVID-19 vaccine after they've suffered a rare complication from a prior COVID infection, a U.S. National Institutes of Health-supported study has concluded.

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) affects about 1 in every 3,000 to 4,000 kids who contract COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The comp...

Science Reveals Cause of Smell Loss in COVID-19

One of the hallmarks of a COVID-19 infection has been a lost sense of smell after the infection ends.

In a new study, researchers blame an ongoing immune assault on the olfactory nerve cells — cells found at the top of the nasal cavity — and a decline in the number of those cells. The study was led by a team at Duke Health in Durham, N.C.

“One of the first symptoms that has ty...

A Teen Girl's Diet Could Impact Her Odds for Menstrual Pain

While working on a senior research project as part of her undergraduate degree from Rutgers University, Serah Sannoh decided to analyze peer-reviewed studies on diet and menstrual period pain, partly because of her own struggles with the issue.

What did she find? Sannoh reported in her new study that her research showed foods high in

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 12, 2022
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  • Gut Microbes Could Play Role in HIV Infection

    Could key differences in the trillions of bacteria found in the human gut actually affect the risk of becoming infected with HIV? A small, new study suggests the answer may be yes.

    The intriguing possibility stems from a detailed analysis of the gut bacteria ("

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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  • Smoggy Days Could Help Send Kids With Autism to the ER

    Could air pollution land children with autism in the hospital?

    A new study found that short-term exposure to air pollution is linked to a higher risk for hospitalization among kids with the developmental disorder.

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often admitted due to such ...

    In Rare Cases, Monkeypox Can Trigger Dangerous Brain Inflammation

    Though the risk appears small, a new review suggests that, in rare instances, monkeypox may trigger serious neurological complications, including seizures and brain inflammation.

    The finding is based on a look at 19 studies conducted in the United States, the United Kingdom and across Africa.

    A...

    Red Meat Raises Your Heart Risk, and Scientists May Know Why

    A daily hamburger might raise the risk of developing heart disease, but not necessarily for the reasons people often think, new research suggests.

    The study of nearly 4,000 older Americans found what many have before: People who ate a lot of red meat had a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke.<...

    How Grief Harms the Body After a Spouse's Death

    Heartache and heartbreak are apt terms for the intense grief caused by losing a spouse.

    A new study says such a loss can lead to major health problems and even death, and the paper may help explain why that happens.

    When faced with stressful situations, grieving spouses have significant increases in

    Shingles Won't Raise Risk for Dementia: Study

    If you've survived a painful bout of shingles, at least you won't have to worry that it might raise your future risk of dementia, new research indicates.

    Shingles, caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus, results in a blistering rash from nerve inflammation, and there has been speculation that the in...

    Study Uncovers Strong Links Between Depression and Crohn's, Colitis

    New research points to a compelling interplay between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression.

    IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to the physical pain that these illnesses c...

    Long-Term Heart Inflammation Strikes 1 in 8 Hospitalized COVID Patients

    A year after being hospitalized with COVID-19, more than 12% of patients had been diagnosed with heart inflammation, according to a new study of the long-term effects of the virus.

    For the study, researchers in Scotland followed 159 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between May 2020 a...

    Gout Medicine May Also Help Fight Heart Failure

    The anti-inflammatory benefits of a common gout medicine may help save the lives of heart failure patients, researchers say.

    The medication, colchicine, could also reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients whose arteries are clogged with cholesterol, according to t...

    Understanding How COVID Can Trigger Loss of Smell

    It has happened to millions during the pandemic: a sudden loss of smell that heralds the start of a COVID-19 infection. But scientists have been stumped as to why.

    Until now.

    New research suggests the symptom is due to inflammation rather than directly caused by the coronavirus.

    The researchers noted that loss of smell (

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 5, 2022
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  • Heart Inflammation Very Rare After COVID Vaccination

    The heart inflammation that followed COVID-19 shots in some teens and young adults is rare and a new study affirms that your risk is extremely low.

    Inflammation of the heart muscle (myoperic...

    Heart Inflammation Rare Among Hospitalized COVID Patients

    As doctors learn more about the consequences of COVID-19, they are confirming that heart inflammation is rare among hospitalized COVID patients. That's the good news - but those who develop it are much more likely to require intensive care, a new study suggests.

    Inflammation of the heart muscle (

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2022
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  • With COVID, Inflammation May Be Triggering Loss of Smell

    Immune system-triggered inflammation is the likely reason for the loss of smell reported by many COVID-19 patients, a new study finds.

    "As a neuropathologist, I wondered why smell loss is a very common symptom with COVID-19 but not with other respiratory diseases," said lead study author Dr. Cheng-Ying Ho. She ...

    Could Some Rheumatoid Arthritis Meds Help Lower Alzheimer's Risk?

    In their search for a drug to prevent Alzheimer's disease, scientists are taking a look at certain rheumatoid arthritis drugs.

    Preliminary findings suggest that a type of rheumatoid arthritis drug known as TNF inhibitors may lower dementia risk in rheumatoid arthritis patients who also suffer from heart disease.

    But no one is suggesting these drugs be prescribed broadly to stave of...

    Older Kids More Vulnerable to MIS-C: Study

    Older children and teens are the most vulnerable to severe cases of a rare inflammatory disorder that can occur in youngsters who've had COVID-19, a new study finds.

    It included 232 children aged 18 and younger who were admitted to 15 hospitals in Canada, Costa Rica and Iran with suspected multi-system inflammatory syndrome (

  • By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 11, 2022
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  • Kids With COVID-Linked MIS-C Have Long-Term Symptoms

    Following a bout of severe COVID-19, some children suffer lasting neurological complications, part of a rare condition called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a new study finds.

    The neurological symptoms are wide-ranging, and can include headaches, difficulty falling and staying asleep, daytime sleepine...

    Could a Chewing Gum in Pregnancy Help Prevent Premature Deliveries?

    Gum disease has been linked to an increased risk for preterm birth, and now new research suggests that chewing sugar-free gum with xylitol during pregnancy may lower this risk.

    The study took place in Malawi, Africa, which has one of the world's highest rates of preterm delivery. Experts are quick t...

    Stroke Risk Highest for Older COVID Patients Soon After Diagnosis

    Stroke is a possible complication of COVID-19, and researchers say they now know when that risk is highest.

    A new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the risk of COVID-related ischemic stroke appears greatest in the first three days after you're diagn...

    Vitamin D Supplements Might Cut Your Odds for Autoimmune Diseases

    Taking vitamin D supplements may help stave off psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and other autoimmune diseases, a new study suggests.

    Previous research has hinted at this connection, but the new study is the first randomized controlled trial to look at what happens when people are given vitamin D supplements and followed to see if they develop an

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 27, 2022
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  • Survivors of Severe COVID Face Higher Odds for Another Hospitalization Soon After

    People hospitalized for COVID-19 are not necessarily out of the woods once they're discharged: Many land in the hospital again in the months afterward, a large U.K. study finds.

    The researchers found that in the 10 months after leaving the hospital, COVID-19 patients were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized or die, compared to the general population. And even compared with people...

    Can CBD Help Curb COVID? Maybe, But More Study Needed

    Cannabidiol, a compound derived from marijuana, appears to show promise in blocking replication of the COVID-19 virus and preventing its spread, lab and animal studies show.

    CBD inhibited the ability of the coronavirus to spread in human lung cell samples, and also...

    COVID Can Affect Brains of Hospitalized Kids

    The coronavirus can leave more than 40% of children hospitalized for COVID-19 with headaches and other lingering neurological symptoms, a new study claims.

    And the kids who developed these headaches or experienced an altered mental status known as acute encephalopathy were more ...

    Heart Function Rebounds for Kids With COVID-Linked MIS-C

    A rare and serious inflammatory condition called MIS-C can strike kids weeks after they've recovered from their COVID infection.

    But now there's good news for parents: Children tend to recover completely from any heart injury within three months of falling ill, a new study from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) shows.

    "Although it can be quite serious and very, very rar...

    Vaping Might Worsen COVID-19 Symptoms

    If you vape and catch COVID-19, you may feel a whole lot worse than people who come down with the virus but don't use electronic cigarettes, researchers say.

    When compared to folks with COVID-19 who didn't use e-cigarettes, those who did were more likely to report chest pain, c...

    Unlucky in Love? It Can Damage Men's Health, Study Finds

    Men who are broken-hearted or just unlucky in love could be more likely to have health-damaging inflammation, new research suggests.

    Serious breakups and solo living for many years may increase the risk of ill health and death -- but apparently only for men, according to the researchers behind a new Danish study.

    "Small numbers of breakups or years lived alone is not in itself a ri...

    When Gums Aren't Healthy, Mind and Body May Follow

    Gum disease isn't just a threat to your teeth. It also increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, mental woes and more, British researchers report.

    "The study reinforces the importance of prevention, early identification and treatment of periodontal disease, and the need for members of th...

    More Evidence Heart Risk From COVID Vaccine Is Very Low

    There's a very low risk of heart inflammation after getting the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, according to a new study that adds to previous research supporting the safety of the shots.

    The two mRNA vaccines had been linked in some studies with an increased risk of

    Animal Study Suggests Link Between Obesity and Gum Disease

    It is likely a connection few have considered, but new research in mice suggests that obesity may up your risk of gum disease.

    Specifically, chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells called osteoclasts that break down bone tissue -- including alveolar bone that holds teeth in place.

    “Although there is a clear relationship between the degree of obe...

    New Asthma Drug Helps Kids, But Price Tag Is High

    Children with hard-to-control asthma may get relief from adding an injectable antibody drug to their standard treatment, a clinical trial has found.

    The drug, called dupilumab (Dupixent), has been available for several years to treat stubborn asthma in adults and teenagers. Based on the new findings, the

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 9, 2021
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  • Stool Samples From the 1980s Hold Clues to Fighting HIV Today

    What do all the microbes living rent-free in your gut have to do with disease risk? Perhaps a lot.

    A groundbreaking analysis of decades-old stool and blood samples from the early AIDS epidemic suggests that men who had high levels of inflammation-causing bacteria in their intestin...

    Young People Recover Quickly From Rare Heart Side Effect of COVID Vaccine

    It happens very rarely, but most teens and young adults who do experience heart inflammation (myocarditis) after a COVID-19 shot have mild symptoms and recover quickly, new research shows.

    “Overwhelmingly, data continue to indicate that the benefits of COVID-19 vaccinat...

    Gene Found in Amish Helps Protect Their Hearts

    A rare gene variant discovered among Amish people may help lower "bad" cholesterol and protect against heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among nearly 7,000 Amish people, the gene variant was tied to reductions in both LDL cholesterol and fibrinogen -- a protein that is a marker of inflammation and linked to heart disease risk.

    There was also evidence of pro...

    Vaping Can Trigger Gene Changes in Cells: Study

    For those who think vaping is safer than smoking, think again.

    A new study warns that vaping triggers the same gene regulation changes that smoking does, so it may raise the risk of cancer and other serious diseases.

    "Our study, for the first time, investigates the biological effects of vaping in adult e-cigarette users, while simultaneously accounting for their past smoking exposur...

    COVID May Trigger Heart Condition in Young Athletes

    A heart condition, myocarditis, has been found in a number of U.S. college athletes who have had COVID-19, a new study finds.

    Myocarditis has also been linked in some young people to the COVID vaccine. But the odds are far greater that this inflammation of the heart muscle will occur in those who get COVID infection itself, experts said.

    "We're still learning about how the vir...

    Give Others Help, Get Back Health Benefits: Study

    When it comes to helping others and your health, it might be better to give than to receive, a new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 Americans between 34 and 84 about their social involvement and how much they thought they could rely on their family, friends or a spouse if they needed help.

    On a key measure of health -- chronic inflammation -- positive social rela...

    Drug Long Used for Alcoholism Might Fight Severe COVID-19

    A widely available drug used to treat alcoholism has potential as a COVID-19 treatment, researchers say.

    The investigators found that people taking disulfiram (Antabuse) for alcoholism had a lower risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and were less likely to die from COVID-19 if infected than those not taking the drug.

  • Robert Preidt
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  • November 23, 2021
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