Get Healthy!

Results for search "Infections: Misc.".

Health News Results - 920

Most Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll

Many American teens and young adults are now embracing the chance to get COVID-19 vaccines, a new survey finds.

But youth-focused messaging will still be needed to convince a minority of those aged 14 to 24 that they should be vaccinated, the University of Michigan researchers said. Still, the good news is that more young people are ready to get their shots than said they were ready to do...

One Good Way to Help Beat COVID: Exercise

Exercise guards against a host of chronic diseases that can plague people as they age, but can it also protect against severe cases of COVID-19?

New research suggests that's so: Being physically active reduced COVID-19 patients' risk of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death, and even being just somewhat active provided some protection.

"This is a wake-up cal...

America's STD Rate at Record High Again: CDC

There's another epidemic sweeping the United States: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Statistics for 2019 -- the latest data available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- show that STD rates in the United States hit a new high again for the sixth straight year.

In 2019, nearly 2.5 million Americans had an infection of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis, ...

Many Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic Symptoms

In very rare cases, children infected with the new coronavirus can develop a severe illness known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Now, research finds that these young patients often develop neurologic symptoms along with the respiratory issues they might face.

These neurologic symptoms were present in half of children who were hospitalized with MIS-C, U.K. researchers say.

U.S. Health Agencies Call for Pause in J&J COVID Vaccine After 6 People Develop Clots

After six people who received the Johnson & Johnson one-dose COVID-19 vaccine developed a type of rare and severe blood clot, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday each said they will seek a "pause" in use of the shots as they review the data.

The six cases involved what's known as a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), a ...

U.K. Variant Won't Trigger More Severe COVID, Studies Find

Two new studies out of Britain find that although the now-dominant "U.K. variant" of the new coronavirus does spread more quickly, it does not appear to lead to more severe disease in those made ill.

The findings should help allay fears that more patients will die after infection with the variant, officially labeled B.1.1.7.

Scientists published the findings online April 12 in two<...

Antibody Cocktail May Curb Infection in Unvaccinated Who Are Exposed to COVID-19

People living with someone who has COVID-19 appear to get powerful protection against infection when they are given Regeneron's antibody cocktail, a new study shows.

The findings suggest that beyond preventing the worst outcomes for coronavirus infection when given early enough, the cocktail could also prevent people from getting sick in the first place, the company said Monday.

<...

Bright Side: Sunnier Areas Have Lower COVID-19 Death Rates

COVID-19 might have a tough new foe: The sun.

New research shows that sunnier regions of the United States have lower COVID-19 death rates than cloudier areas, suggesting that the sun's UV rays might somehow provide some protection against the disease.

The effect is not due to better uptake of the healthy "sunshine vitamin," vitamin D, noted the Scottish research team led by Richard...

COVID Cases Climb in the Midwest as British Variant Takes Hold in U.S.

As new coronavirus cases soared across the Upper Midwest on Wednesday, the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that a highly infectious variant first discovered in Britain has now become the most common source of infections in this country.

"Based on our most recent estimates from CDC surveillance, the B.1.1.7 variant is now the most common lineage ci...

A Few People With COVID Went a Crowded Bar: Here's What Happened

COVID-19 is so contagious that even a single breach of social distancing measures can have far-reaching consequences.

A case in point: An explosion of new COVID-19 cases traced to five people who joined in on a bar's opening night in rural Illinois in February.

Four of the five who attended the crowded gathering (the bar's capacity was 100 people) were already experiencing symptom...

Public Lost Trust in CDC During COVID Crisis: Poll

Americans' trust in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declined during the COVID-19 pandemic, an opinion poll finds.

Researchers polled more than 2,000 Americans in May 2020 and questioned most again five months later. Respondents were asked to rate their trust of the CDC, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on a low-to-h...

Moderna COVID Vaccine Offers Protection for at Least 6 Months: Study

There's good news for the millions of Americans who've already received a dose or two of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine: New research shows the vaccine should protect against illness for at least six months.

The new study tracked 33 participants in the trials that led to the vaccine's approval. Six months after having received their second vaccine dose, "antibody activity remained high in al...

Low Risk That Scientists Can Pass Coronavirus to North American Bats

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists thought twice about studying North American bats in their winter habitats. But they've now determined that the risk of humans passing the coronavirus to bats under these conditions was low.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) led the study. It found the risk to be one in 1,000 with no protective measures and one in 3,333 with proper use of per...

If You've Had COVID, One Vaccine Jab Will Do: Study

A new U.S. study offers more evidence that a single dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine may provide enough protection to people who've previously been infected with the coronavirus.

"Our findings extend those from smaller studies reported elsewhere and support a potential strategy of providing a single dose of vaccine to persons with a confirmed prior history of coronavirus infection, al...

Got Your COVID Vaccine? Don't Stop Being Cautious, Experts Say

Just because you've had your COVID-19 vaccination doesn't mean you can stop taking steps to protect yourself and others, experts say.

So far, only about 16% of Americans have been fully vaccinated, and on March 24, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 6.7% increase in the seven-day average number of daily cases, compared to the prior week.

About 60,000 peo...

When Will America's Kids Get Their COVID Vaccines?

Kids will be kids, and that's exactly why Holly McDade plans to get her three young children the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it becomes available to them.

"Little kids can't help but touch their mouths and their noses and touch other things," said McDade, 32, of Strasburg, Va. "They just don't think about it. It's not where their brains are at yet."

McDade isn't concerned so much ab...

1 in 4 Parents Won't Vaccinate Their Kids Against COVID-19: Poll

More than one-quarter of U.S. parents don't plan to vaccinate their kids for COVID-19, and roughly as many oppose school-required coronavirus shots, a new study finds.

This opposition was more common among moms than dads, and was especially common among white mothers who identified as Republican/Republican-leaning, the researchers said.

"Women tend to serve as family health managers...

Many Recovering COVID Patients Show Signs of Long-Term Organ Damage

Long-term organ damage appears to be common in hospitalized COVID-19 patients after they've recovered and been discharged, British researchers report.

One U.S. expert who read over the report said she's seen the same in her practice.

"This study proves that the damage done is not just to the lungs, but can affect the heart, the brain and the kidneys, as well," said Dr. Mangala Naras...

Can Vaccinations Stop COVID Transmission? College Study Aims to Find Out

It's the question everyone wants answered because reopening the world depends on it: Can coronavirus vaccines stop transmission of the virus?

Now, 21 universities across the United States are teaming up to find out.

The project, called Prevent COVID U, was started by the COVID-19 Prevention Network housed at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

The study inc...

He Watched His Hospitalized Son Battle COVID-Linked Illness

In January, the coronavirus swept through Brian and Maria Padla's family of seven in Philadelphia, starting with their oldest daughter, 16, and then infecting Brian, Maria, and their four younger children.

The virus seemingly came and went without much fanfare for the family. During their two-week-long quarantine, the kids spent a day or two with runny noses and low-grade fevers. Brian an...

New Coronavirus Can Also Infect Cells in the Mouth

Add another part of your body to the list of what COVID-19 can invade: New research shows mouth cells can be infected with the new coronavirus.

Previous studies have shown that the coronavirus infects the upper airways and lungs, the digestive system, blood vessels and kidneys, which may explain the wide-ranging symptoms experienced by COVID-19 patients.

Those symptoms include loss ...

Have to Travel During Spring Break? Here's How to Stay Safe

If you must travel during the spring break, be sure to follow recommended COVID-19 pandemic safety measures, an emergency medicine doctor advises.

Millions of people are packing airports, while only one-quarter of the U.S. population has received at least one shot of a COVID-19 vaccine, noted Dr. Lewis Nelson, director of the department of emergency medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical ...

Diabetes Is Deadlier for Black Americans: Study

Black people have higher diabetes death rates than white people in the 30 largest cities in the United States, a new study finds.

But placing a cap on the price of insulin could narrow that racial gap, according to researcher Joanna Buscemi, of DePaul University in Chicago. Insulin medication is needed by all people with type 1 diabetes and many who have type 2, the more common form of th...

In Rare Cases, People Can Get COVID After Vaccination

It's very rare, but it is possible to catch COVID-19 even if you've been vaccinated, a new study finds.

Looking at vaccinated health care workers at two University of California campuses, researchers found a tiny number tested positive for the virus. This finding highlights the need to keep wearing a mask and to keep social distancing, the researchers said.

"Because of the compulso...

Another Study Finds COVID Doesn't Spread in Schools With Proper Safeguards

COVID-19 transmission is rare in schools that follow precautions such as mandatory masks, social distancing and frequent hand-washing, a new study finds.

And that's true even among close school contacts of people who test positive for the new coronavirus, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Schools can operate safely during a pandemic ...

Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as health system employees learned more about the safety and efficacy data gathered during clinical trials of the vaccines, r...

Feeling Rundown? It Could Raise Your Odds for Severe COVID

Groggy during the day? Feeling burned out at work? That could put you at increased risk for COVID-19 and more severe illness, a new study suggests.

"We found that lack of sleep at night, severe sleep problems and high level of burnout may be risk factors for COVID-19" for frontline health care workers, according to a team led by Dr. Sara Seidelmann, an assistant professor of clinical med...

COVID-19 May Trigger Long-Term Thyroid Issues: Study

Yet another organ seems to be affected by a bout of COVID-19: the thyroid.

Italian researchers have examined the thyroids of dozens of patients who've recovered from moderate-to-severe cases of COVID-19. The study found evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection may trigger an inflammation of the gland in some patients.

Whether that inflammation can cause long-term dysfunction is still unc...

Some Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Face High Risk of Severe COVID-19

Poorly controlled type 1 diabetes significantly increases a child's risk of COVID-19 complications and death, researchers warn.

The risk of complications is 10 times higher in youngsters with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes than in those with well-controlled diabetes, according to a study presented Saturday at a virtual meeting of The Endocrine Society.

"This study shows keeping d...

CDC Says 3 Feet of Social Distancing Now OK in Most Classrooms

In a move that should make reopening schools an easier task, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday lowered its social distancing recommendation for most classrooms to 3 feet.

That should enable many schools to keep all students enrolled in a class within the same room.

"[The] CDC is committed to leading with science and updating our guidance as new evidence...

You've Had Your Vaccine, What Can You Safely Do Now?

The U.S. COVID-19 vaccination program is proceeding apace, with more than one-fifth of adult Americans having received at least one dose and eligibility opening up for everyone by May 1, under orders from President Joe Biden.

That means the fully vaccinated now have one pressing question: What can I do now that I haven't been able to do before?

In a new

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • March 19, 2021
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Wuhan Study Supports Need for Vaccines to Stop COVID's Spread

    Fewer than 1 in 10 people in Wuhan carried COVID-19 antibodies in their bloodstream four months after the coronavirus outbreak in the Chinese city that served as a harbinger of a global pandemic, a new study shows.

    Further, only about 40% of those people tested positive for the sort of neutralizing antibodies needed to stave off a future infection, according to the report, published March...

    Surgical Patients Allergic to Penicillin Have Another Safe Alternative

    The antibiotic cefazolin is a safe alternative to prevent infection in most surgical patients who are allergic to penicillin, according to a new study.

    Cefazolin is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin. It's the recommended antibiotic for most surgical procedures, but some doctors are reluctant to give it to patients with penicillin-allergies based on research from the 1960s and ...

    Still Leery of COVID Vaccines? Top Expert Debunks Those Myths

    Don't believe everything you hear: A sizable minority of Americans are still hesitant about getting the new COVID-19 vaccine, but their fears are mostly not warranted, a leading vaccine expert says.

    "Not only has it been shown to be safe in tens of thousands of people before approval, it's been shown to be safe in tens of millions of people post-approval," Dr. Paul Offit, director of the ...

    Some Long Haul COVID Patients Are Feeling Better After Vaccination

    For many, it's like emerging suddenly from a long, dark tunnel.

    Some people who've been laid low for months by so-called "long haul" symptoms after a coronavirus infection say that within days of getting their COVID-19 vaccine, those symptoms nearly disappeared.

    Speaking with The New York Times, Bridget Hayward, a 51-year-old operating room nurse in Alexandria, Va....

    Disappointment and Hope From Two HIV Prevention Trials

    An antibody infusion being tested for preventing HIV does not seem to thwart most infections -- but its success against certain strains of the virus suggests researchers are on the right track.

    That's the takeaway from a clinical trial that put the antibody, called VRC01, to the test in 2,700 people at high risk of contracting HIV.

    Researchers found that infusions of the antibody ev...

    Most Women Can Give Birth Naturally Even When Water Breaks Early: Study

    Most women can have a natural childbirth even if labor doesn't begin soon after their water breaks, according to a new study.

    This situation occurs in about 11% of pregnant women who carry to term. Labor is typically induced in such cases.

    But University of Michigan researchers found there is no significant increased risk to mother or infant in waiting awhile for labor to begin on i...

    'Slow Walkers' at Higher Odds for Severe COVID-19

    If you saunter and shuffle instead of scurry when you walk, you are at higher risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19, British researchers warn.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 412,000 middle-aged Britons and found that among those whose weight was normal, slow walkers were more than twice as likely to develop severe COVID-19 and 3.75 times more likely...

    Half of COVID Survivors Struggle With Depression: Study

    To the lingering damage of COVID-19 infection, add this side effect: New research shows that more than half of those sickened by COVID-19 report depression.

    Among more than 3,900 people who had COVID-19 surveyed between May 2020 and January 2021, 52% suffered symptoms of major depression, researchers found.

    "People who have been ill with COVID-19 can experience depressive symptoms f...

    Need an Operation? Here's How COVID Has Changed Surgery

    This year, COVID-19 has made decisions around surgery tougher than ever for folks who may need one. But one major medical group can help provide some answers.

    Top on their list: Is it safe to have surgery right now?

    "It is very safe to have surgery, especially with all of the precautions in place," said Dr. Beverly Philip, president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)...

    Health Care Workers More Likely to Catch COVID at Home, Not Workplace

    Health care workers are more likely to catch COVID-19 at home or in their community than on the job, a new study finds.

    "The news is reassuring in that it shows the measures taken are working to prevent infections from spreading in health care facilities," said study co-author Dr. Anthony Harris. He's professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medi...

    Nearly All Americans Who Got First COVID Shot Are Are Getting Their Second

    In more good news on the coronavirus vaccine front, a new government report finds that 88% of Americans who get their first COVID-19 shot return for their second.

    That bodes well for the United States, since full vaccination is vital to stopping the pandemic.

    In December 2020, the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines were approved for emergency use, but both require two shots to get...

    People With Intellectual Disabilities at High Risk for Fatal COVID-19

    Having an intellectual disability is second only to being elderly as a risk factor for dying from COVID-19, a new study suggests.

    "The chances of dying from COVID-19 are higher for those with intellectual disability than they are for people with congestive heart failure, kidney disease or lung disease," said study author Dr. Jonathan Gleason, chief quality officer at Jefferson Health, in ...

    Backyard Chicken Coops Pose Threat of 'Viral Spillover' to People

    Raising chickens in your backyard -- a popular trend during the COVID-19 pandemic -- holds risks that can come home to roost in an unwelcome way.

    It's already well known that poultry can spread the salmonella bacteria to human handlers. But chickens cooped up in backyards could also be breeding grounds for viruses that pose an even bigger public health threat, according to Sonia Hernandez...

    Why Cotton Masks Are Safer Masks

    Cotton masks provide better protection against the new coronavirus than those made with synthetic fabrics, researchers say.

    In a new study, investigators tested different mask fabrics under conditions that mimic the humidity of a person's breath in order to assess how the fabrics perform in actual use.

    Under humid conditions, filtration efficiency (a measure of how well a material c...

    How Bad Was COVID in Your State? Governor's Party Affiliation Was Key

    Could whether your governor is a Democrat or a Republican have influenced how many coronavirus cases and deaths your state has seen during the pandemic?

    Yes, claim researchers who discovered a strong link between the two -- by late last summer, the odds of dying from COVID-19 was nearly twice as high in states whose governors were Republicans versus states with Democratic governors....

    Social Distancing Probably Stopped 2020 Outbreak of Paralyzing Disorder in Kids

    Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic appears to have prevented an anticipated outbreak of a rare polio-like syndrome in children, researchers report.

    Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a spinal condition that causes weakness in the limbs, impairs motor function and can lead to lifelong disabilities. It was first reported in the United States in 2012, with outbreaks recurring every ...

    New Guidelines Mean Nursing Home Residents Can Hug Their Families Again

    After nearly a year of painful isolation, the U.S. government said Wednesday that vaccinated nursing home residents can hug their loved ones again and enjoy more indoor visits.

    The new guidance, issued by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), comes after coronavirus cases and deaths among nursing home residents have plummeted in recent weeks as the country's vacc...

    Is It Safe to Have Surgery Soon After a COVID Diagnosis?

    If you have surgery scheduled and you just found out you are infected with COVID-19, new research suggests you should push your operation back by at least seven weeks.

    Why? Because not doing so could raise your risk of postoperative death, British scientists warn.

    "We found that patients operated [on] 0 to 6 weeks after SARS-CoV-2 infection diagnosis are at increased risk of postope...

    Pollen Peril: Sneezin' Season May Up COVID Risk

    It's that time of year when flowers and trees bloom freely and pollen makes the lives of many miserable. But new research reveals a hidden risk: It could also make you more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection.

    COVID-19 infection rates waxed and waned with pollen counts in 2020, according to tracking data gathered across 31 countries in every corner of the globe.

    "Airborne pollen can pa...