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29 Aug

The Dangers of Cardiometabolic Disease

Efforts to Reduce Deaths from Heart Disease Are Stalling, According to a New Study.

Health News Results - 74

75 or Older? Statins Can Still Benefit Your Heart

Older adults with healthy hearts probably would benefit from taking a cholesterol-lowering statin, a new study contends.

People 75 and older who were free of heart disease and prescribed a statin wound up with a 25% lower risk of death from any cause and a 20% lower risk of heart-related death, researchers reported July 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association...

Researchers Latch Onto the Leech's Genome

A mainstay of 18th-century medicine -- the lowly leech -- has made something of a comeback in the 21st century. That's largely due to powerful blood thinners the parasitic worm secretes naturally.

Now, genetic research could give a major boost to the medical use of leeches, scientists say.

An international team sequenced the genome of a European leech called Hirudo medici...

Cancer Patients Less Likely to Be Prescribed Heart Meds: Study

Heart disease is on the rise among cancer patients and survivors, but they're less likely than people without cancer to be prescribed medicines to protect their heart, a new study finds.

Heart disease has become a leading cause of long-term preventable death in cancer survivors, according to the study published June 16 as a research letter in the journal JACC: CardioOncology.<...

Stroke Treatment Gap Narrows Between Men and Women

Women who have a stroke are far more likely to be treated with clot-busting drugs than they used to be, new research shows.

In the early 2000s, women suffering a stroke were 30% less likely than men to get clot-busting treatment, also known as thrombolysis. Recently, the gap has narrowed to 13%.

The researchers reached that conclusion by pooling data from 24 studies...

Blood Pressure Meds Help the Frail Elderly Live Longer

Blood pressure drugs help even the most frail elderly live longer, and older people who are healthier get the biggest benefit, Italian researchers say.

"We knew that high blood pressure medication was protective in general among older people, however, we focused on whether it is also protective in frail patients with many other medical conditions who are usually excluded from randomi...

Exercise Habits Key to Gauging Seniors' Longevity

Knowing how much older adults exercise can predict their odds of developing heart disease or dying early, a new study suggests.

Asking patients during atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) screening about their levels of exercise can help start treatment sooner, researchers say.

"With people now living longer, there is a growing need to determine how we can best detect latent...

After Heart Attack, Home Care Can Prevent a Return to Hospital

Receiving home health care reduces heart attack survivors' risk of hospital readmission after discharge, a new study finds.

In the United States, only a small percentage of heart attack survivors receive home care such as nursing and physical therapy, according to study authors.

The findings were presented recently at a virtual American Heart Association meeting. Research p...

Healthier Heart, Better Brain in Old Age

Preventing heart disease may protect you from dementia, researchers say.

The new study looked at nearly 1,600 people, at an average age of 79.5, who were followed for 21 years. Their heart disease risk was assessed at the outset, and participants had annual memory and thinking tests.

The takeaway: People with a higher risk of heart disease also had greater mental (cognitive)...

Poor Americans Likely to Miss Preventive Heart Screenings: Study

Low-income Americans are much less likely to be screened for heart disease or to receive counseling about controlling risk factors, a new study finds.

Heart health screenings -- such as regular blood pressure and cholesterol checks -- and counseling to improve diet, increase exercise or quit smoking play important roles in reducing heart disease risk.

Income has long been as...

Cardiac Rehab Boosts Quality of Life After Heart Attack: Study

Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve heart attack survivors' quality of life, especially if they get lots of exercise, a new British study finds.

A heart attack can reduce quality of life due to struggles with mobility and self-care, as well as daily leisure and work activities.

Many heart attack survivors take part in cardiac rehab, which emphasizes exercise, quitting sm...

Heart Patients Should Ask About Home-Based Cardiac Rehab

For those with heart problems, home-based rehab can take the place of hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation during the current coronavirus pandemic, heart experts say.

"Home-based cardiac rehab is a solution to help provide cardiac rehabilitation to patients with heart disease in a home setting, and to help them survive and thrive during this challenging period of time," said Dr. Ran...

More Evidence That Ditching Red Meat Is Good for Your Heart

If you want a longer, healthier life, try replacing that steak with beans, vegetables or whole grains -- but preferably not a fast-food veggie burger.

That's according to two preliminary studies by Harvard researchers. They found that people who eat plenty of "high-quality" plant foods instead of red or processed meat have a lower risk of heart attack and tend to live longer.

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After Heart Attack, Following Doctor's Orders Greatly Boosts Survival

Heart attack survivors receive a laundry list of tasks from their doctors as they leave the hospital, all aimed at improving their heart health.

It would be understandable to look at the list with a raised eyebrow and ask just how important all of it is.

Vitally important, it turns out.

Heart patients who follow all of their doctor's recommendations have a much low...

Weight-Loss Surgery Works, No Matter How Long Patient Was Obese

Weight-loss surgery is as effective for people who became obese before age 20 as for older patients, new research shows.

For the study, researchers from the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden, analyzed data from just over 4,000 obese adults. Half had undergone weight-loss surgery, half did not. They were divided into three groups based on their body mass index (BMI) at age 20: normal...

Wearable 'Brain Stimulator' May Boost Stroke Recovery

A noninvasive magnetic brain stimulation device worn less than an hour a day can increase activity near stroke-injured areas of the brain, a small, preliminary study suggests.

Those improvements in brain activity might then lead to increased motor function in people who have had a stroke, the researchers said.

"We were excited to see a strong hint of improved motor functio...

Small Babies Have High Risk for Heart-Lung Weakness as Adults: Study

Being small at birth after a full-term pregnancy could leave you gasping for breath later on in life.

Swedish researchers report that babies with low birth weights are more likely to have poor heart-lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness when they reach adulthood.

Cardiorespiratory fitness -- the ability to supply oxygen to muscles during prolonged physical activity -- is key for ...

Don't Want a 2nd Heart Attack? Lose the Belly Fat

For heart attack survivors, a fat belly could mean another one is likely, a new study suggests.

Earlier studies have shown that abdominal obesity puts people at risk for their first heart attack. This new study shows it also ups the odds for a second one, researchers say.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk ...

New Heart Attack Treatment Shows Promise in Pig Study

A new compound might help stem the damage of a heart attack, research in animals suggests.

Giving recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-AB (rhPDGF-AB) to pigs lessened the effect of heart scarring, helped form new blood vessels and reduced the rates of heart arrhythmias, heart failure and sudden cardiac death, researchers found.

"This is an entirely new approach,...

Do You Know the 5 Symptoms of a Heart Attack? Many Don't

Time is of the essence when you're having a heart attack.

But one in five Americans can't name the three most common symptoms of a heart attack, making it more likely they won't promptly respond to the life-threatening health crisis, a new study reports.

"More than 20% were unaware of the common symptoms of a heart attack," said senior researcher Dr. Khurram Nasir, a pre...

Artificial Intelligence Uses ECGs to Predict A-Fib Risk

In two studies, artificial intelligence was used with electrocardiogram (ECG) results to identify patients who are at increased risk for a potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat, and those more likely to die within a year, researchers say.

Using more than 2 million ECG results gathered over three decades, the team created "deep neural networks" that predict future events from an EC...

Some Jobs Are Better for Women's Hearts Than Others

Could your chosen profession determine the health of your heart?

It could certainly have an influence, new research suggests.

Scientists analyzed data from more than 65,000 postmenopausal women in the United States and found that several jobs were associated with poor heart health.

Compared to women with other jobs, the risk of poor heart health was: 36% higher...

Ultra-Processed Foods May Fast Track You to Heart Trouble

Grab-and-go foods are an easy option for busy lives, but if you opt for ultra-processed foods a lot, you may pick up something you don't want -- heart disease.

About 55% of Americans' daily calories come from eating ultra-processed foods, a new study found. And the more calories that came from ultra-processed foods, the worse heart health was, the findings suggested.

"...

Protect Your Heart Through the Holiday Season

It's never too soon to take steps to safeguard your heart health, and that includes being aware of seasonal heart attack triggers.

Researchers are trying to understand why, but studies done around the world have noted spikes in deaths from heart-related events during the holiday season.

Unlike deaths from the flu, they don't seem related to cold weather. As one example, it'...

Smartphone App Gets Heart Patients to Follow Their Rx

Forget doctor's instructions: New research shows a smartphone app is the best way to get heart patients to remember to take their medicines.

Heart attack survivors are typically prescribed medications to prevent another attack, but one in four stop taking at least one drug within 30 days after leaving the hospital. That increases the chance of re-hospitalization and premature death.<...

Scientists Discover New Way Fat Harms Your Arteries

Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease -- a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

The British researchers found that in heart disease patients who are obese, body fat surrounding the arteries tends to secrete high amounts of a protein called WNT5A. The protein, in turn, appears to have "tox...

Radiation Rx Might Ease a Dangerous Irregular Heart Beat

A new technique that uses a targeted high dose of radiation seems to prevent recurrence of a potentially deadly heartbeat for at least two years, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

This irregular rhythm, called ventricular tachycardia (VT), occurs when the heart's lower chambers start to beat uncontrollably fast. Once it starts, it can kill ...

Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment Does Not Put Seniors at Risk: Study

Intensive treatment to lower high blood pressure can decrease older adults' risk of sharp blood pressure drops that can cause dizziness and increase the likelihood of falling, a new study says.

It included more than 2,800 patients, average age 63, who had recently suffered a stroke.

Half received more aggressive treatment to lower their blood pres...

Exercise May Be of Extra Benefit to People With Heart Disease

Regular exercise benefits heart disease patients more than healthy people, according to a new study.

It found that while stepping up physical activity reduced the risk of death for people with and without heart disease, those with heart disease had greatest benefit. The more they exercised, the more their risk dropped.

The study included nearly 442,000 people in South Korea...

After Heart Attack, Stenting More Than the Blocked Artery May Be Best

Opening all of a person's clogged arteries after a heart attack can protect their health better than reopening only the one that caused it, a major international clinical trial has concluded.

Opening all blockages and not just the "culprit" behind the attack reduces a patient's risk of dying or having another heart attack by 26%, researchers reported Se...

When Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?

When you stop smoking, your heart starts to rebound right away, but a full recovery can take as long as 15 years, a new study suggests.

"The benefit of quitting smoking cannot be overstated -- the cardiovascular system begins to recover quickly, with some physiologic changes happening within hours," said lead researcher Meredith Duncan, of the division of cardiovascular medicine at Va...

'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent It

There is no cure for a-fib, but the common heart disorder can be managed, an expert says.

Atrial fibrillation -- which can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications -- affects as many as 6 million people in the United States. It's more common in whites than in blacks and Hispanics, and more common among men than women.

Symptoms can incl...

Just 30 Minutes of Light Exercise a Week May Keep Deadly Stroke at Bay

Just a little exercise may help protect you against a type of deadly bleeding stroke, a new study suggests.

As many as half of people who suffer a subarachnoid hemorrhage die within three months.

While smoking and high blood pressure have been shown to increase the risk of this deadly stroke, there has been little evidence on whether exercise can help reduce it.

F...

Many Feel 'Frozen' When Heart Attack Strikes

When a heart attack occurs, delaying treatment by even a few minutes could be deadly.

But many people wait hours after symptoms set in to get care -- either because they feel mentally "frozen" and unable to act, or because they're slow to recognize the seriousness of the situation, a new survey reveals.

The finding stems from a look at how 300 Swedish patients reacted while ...

Highly Processed Diets Tied to Heart Disease, Earlier Death

People who get many of their meals from packages may have heightened risks of heart disease, stroke and premature death, two large studies suggest.

The findings, published online May 29 in the journal BMJ, are the latest to point the finger at "ultra-processed" foods.

They include not only "junk food" -- like chips, sweets and fast food -- but also the breads, process...

Heart Attack Treatment Could Cut 'Bad' Cholesterol by Half Within Hours

Imagine a procedure that filters "bad" LDL cholesterol from your bloodstream in a matter of hours.

The procedure, called LDL apheresis, works somewhat like kidney dialysis. Small amounts of blood are gradually removed from the body through an IV, then passed through a machine that removes LDL cholesterol.

Researchers found that when patients had the procedure a few days afte...

Brain Bleed Risk Puts Safety of Low-Dose Aspirin in Doubt

Let's say you're one of the millions of older adults who takes a low-dose aspirin religiously, in the belief that it will guard against heart disease and heart attacks.

Now, a new review suggests your risk of a brain bleed outweighs any heart benefit that a daily aspirin might bring you.

Researchers said the findings support a recent change to guidelines on low-dose aspirin:...

Timing of Meals Can Influence Heart Attack Recovery

When you eat during the day could influence your chances of surviving a heart attack, a new study finds.

Specifically, skipping breakfast and eating dinner late in the evening were associated with poorer recovery and increased risk of death, scientists report.

"Our research shows that the two eating behaviors are independently linked with poorer outcomes after a heart attack...

Your Life Span May Be Foretold in Your Heart Beats

Where your resting heart rate goes, so goes your health.

That's the suggestion of a new study that found older Swedish men with a resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute had a doubled risk of an early death, even though that rate is well within the normal range of 50 to 100 beats per minute.

That increase in risk held for both death from any cause and death linked to heart...

Black Women in the U.S. Still Missing Out on Heart Care

Older black American women are much less likely to be treated for heart attack and heart disease than white and Hispanic women, researchers say.

"Our study shows that black women still receive less recommended therapy for heart attacks and coronary heart disease than white women, and that improving these racial disparities is still needed," said study author Tarryn Tertulien, a fourth...

Move More, Live Longer

If you're a couch potato, get moving. Your life could depend on it.

Researchers say replacing 30 minutes a day of sitting with physical activity could cut your risk of premature death by nearly half.

They examined 14 years of data on inactivity and activity with more than 92,500 people in an American Cancer Society study.

Among those participants who were least act...

Prescription Fish Oil Pill Lowers Heart Attack Risk in Those Already on Statins

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have high triglycerides and take cholesterol-lowering statins to lower their risk for heart attack or stroke can cut that risk by another 30 percent by adding a high-dose omega-3 fatty acid pill, investigators report.

The prescription drug, called Vascepa, is not to be confused with over-the-counter dietary omega-3 (often...

Heart Care Guidelines Rarely Backed by Top-Notch Science

Precious few treatment guidelines for heart patients are supported by the best scientific evidence, a new study shows.

Less than one in 10 recommendations are based on results from multiple randomized controlled trials (considered the "gold standard"), and that percentage has actually dropped in the past decade, the researchers reported.

For the study, the investigators anal...

An Afternoon Nap May Lower Your Blood Pressure

Want a daytime pick-me-up that may also benefit your blood pressure? Take a nap, researchers suggest.

"Midday sleep appears to lower blood pressure levels at the same magnitude as other lifestyle changes," said Dr. Manolis Kallistratos, a cardiologist at Asklepieion General Hospital in Voula, Greece.

For each hour you nap, systolic blood pressure drops an average of 3 mm ...

NFL Players' Enlarged Hearts May Harm Health for Decades

"Athlete's heart" -- an enlarged heart created by intense physical training -- is a common and often brushed-off condition within elite and professional sports.

But a new study of National Football League players is raising concern about the long-term consequences of athlete's heart when it comes to retirees who have long left the field.

These retirees are as likely to have ...

Another Side Effect of the Opioid Crisis: Heart Infections

New research uncovers more damage wrought by the opioid epidemic: Cases of a dangerous heart infection linked to injection drug use have spiked in recent years at an Ohio medical center.

Researchers found that admissions for infective endocarditis at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center doubled between 2012 and 2017, and that a 436 percent increase in drug-related infection...

Low-Dose Aspirin Doesn't Prolong Survival in Prostate Cancer

Will an aspirin a day keep prostate cancer at bay?

Not necessarily, according to new research.

Danish scientists say low-dose aspirin doesn't seem to reduce a man's risk of death from prostate cancer, but it may slow down the disease in some cases.

For patients with slow-growing, non-aggressive cancer, aspirin did appear to stop the cancer from progressing. A slig...

Better Heart Care Saves U.S. Billions a Year, Study Finds

Efforts to keep seniors heart-healthy have saved tens of billions of dollars in U.S. health care costs in recent years, researchers say.

Between 2005 and 2012, health care spending among people 65 and older fell an average of nearly $3,000 per person a year, the new study found. That adds up to a total savings of $120 billion, with about half coming from Medicare.

And lower ...

Take the Stairs: An 'Exercise Snack' Can Do Wonders for Your Heart and Lungs

Just a few exercise breaks -- or "snacks" -- a day can provide significant benefits, a new study says.

Specifically, it found that short sessions of intense stair climbing spaced throughout the day can improve heart and lung (cardiorespiratory) fitness.

"The findings make it even easier for people to incorporate 'exercise snacks' into their day," said study senior author Ma...

Eating Before Bedtime Won't Send Blood Sugar Levels Soaring

Avoiding food before bedtime probably won't help your blood sugar levels and health, a new study suggests.

Some experts say not eating for two hours before going to bed helps prevent high blood sugar (glucose) levels and related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. But there is no clear evidence to support this theory.

In search of answers, researchers analyz...

How Getting a Flu Shot Could Save Your Life

It's not too late to get your flu shot, which can protect you in ways that may surprise you.

The flu vaccine can be a lifesaver for people with heart disease, according to infectious disease specialist Dr. Michael Chang, assistant professor of pediatrics at University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

"Previous studies have shown influenza vaccination could reduce d...

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