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Health News Results - 185

Even in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older Americans

THURSDAY, Nov. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even a little exposure to the fine particles of air pollution can translate into higher hospitalization rates for a number of common conditions among older Americans, a new study suggests.

"The study shows that the health dangers and economic impacts of air pollution are significantly larger than previously understood," said study author Ya...

Gunshot Wounds Have Long-Term Health Consequences: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department patients treated for gunshot wounds to the chest or abdomen are more likely to wind up in the hospital again than those who have such wounds in other areas of the body, a new study finds.

The study included 110 patients with a history of gunshot wounds. Most were men, with an average age of 50. The patients were seen in...

With Blood Draws, Bedside Manners Matter

MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- How much pain you feel when blood samples are taken could depend on how nice the person wielding the needle is, new research suggests.

Patients were 390% more likely to say their pain was well-controlled when the person taking their blood was courteous, according to a study presented recently at the Anesthesiology annual meeting, in Orland...

Fish Oil Is Good Medicine for Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Nov. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fish oil might help people with heart failure avoid repeat trips to the hospital, a new study suggests.

The findings come from an analysis of a clinical trial first published last year, where researchers tested the effects of fish oil and vitamin D on people's risk of heart disease and cancer.

That main trial -- called the Vitamin ...

Some Headway Made Against 'Superbugs,' but Threat Remains: CDC

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. response to the threat of antibiotic-resistant germs has shown some progress, but these potentially deadly bugs still show no signs of stopping, a new government report warns.

Prevention efforts have reduced deaths from antibiotic-resistant bugs by 18% overall and by nearly 30% in hospitals, the U.S. Centers for Disease Con...

Kidney Injury on the Rise in Women Hospitalized During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney damage among U.S. women hospitalized during pregnancy is on the rise, and those women are more likely to die while in the hospital, a new study finds.

Kidney injury during pregnancy increases the likelihood of complications and death in mothers and their babies.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data on more than 42...

Common Muscle Relaxant Could Pose Mental Dangers for Seniors

SATURDAY, Nov. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant known as baclofen can leave older kidney patients so disoriented that they land in the hospital, a new study warns.

"It can present with acute stroke-like symptoms, even though it's not a stroke," said senior researcher Dr. Amit Garg, a professor of nephrology at Western Univer...

Give Newborn to Mom Right Away -- After Moving the Electrodes

FRIDAY, Nov. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Immediate skin-to-skin contact between newborns and their mothers is encouraged, but poses some potential risks in cases of cesarean birth, researchers say.

In a new report, the researchers described two cases where newly delivered babies came into contact with electrodes on the mothers' skin that were used to monitor her vital signs during C-s...

U.S. ERs See Doubling of Teen Sexual Abuse Cases

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sexually abused youths are turning more often to U.S. emergency departments for help, a new study finds.

Among youths ages 12-17, emergency department admissions for sexual abuse more than doubled from 2010 to 2016, even as rates of sexual abuse showed a decline, researchers found.

Rates in other child age groups remained the same, ac...

Too Many Seniors Back in Hospital for Infections Treated During First Stay

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of hospital readmissions for seniors with infections that were first treated during their initial hospital stay is too high, researchers report.

"We found that as many as 5% of patients leaving the hospital with an infection have a readmission for that pre-existing infection -- that's bad," said Geoffrey Hoffman, an assistant pro...

Not All Heart Failure Patients Get Same Level of Care, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Oct. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're black or Hispanic and hospitalized for heart failure, new research suggests you're less likely to be treated in special cardiac care units.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on nearly 2,000 patients treated for heart failure at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston over 10 years.

"These outcomes are both unjust and...

Language Barriers May Mean Repeat Visits to the Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Language barriers between doctors and patients may translate into return visits to the hospital for certain heart or lung conditions, a new study suggests.

Conducted at two urban hospitals in Canada, the study found the heightened risks among patients with limited English skills who were suffering from either heart failure or chronic obstru...

Family Can Help Keep Delirium at Bay After Surgery

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many older hospital patients suffer delirium after surgery, but a new program that involves the patient's family in recovery may help, a new study suggests.

Called the Tailored, Family-Involved Hospital Elder Life Program (t-HELP), it appears to help lessen the burden of postoperative delirium while maintaining or improving physical and thin...

Drug Limits Damage of Brain Injury

FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many brain injury deaths could be prevented by using an inexpensive drug in the critical hours following a head trauma, a new international study finds.

"Traumatic brain injury can happen to anyone at any time, whether it's through an incident like a car crash or simply falling down the stairs," said study co-leader Ian Roberts, a professor of...

More Patients With Heart Disease Die at Home Than in Hospital

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a third of U.S. heart patients die at home, which is more than the number who die in the hospital, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on more than 12 million heart disease patients who died between 2003 and 2017. They looked at whether the deaths occurred in a hospital, home, nursing or long-term care facility, inpati...

When Baby Makes Four

TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When people in non-monogamous relationships decide to have a baby, they may find that hospitals are not ready to handle their childbirth needs, a new study suggests.

The study is among the first to look into the health care experiences of people in "polyamorous" relationships.

While the term might sound exotic, it's estimated that 2...

Many ICU Admissions May Be Preventable, Large Study Suggests

MONDAY, Oct. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people are unnecessarily admitted to hospital intensive care units (ICUs), a large new study suggests.

Better procedures for selecting patients who need the ICU could save money and improve care, researchers said.

"This study was motivated by my experiences caring for patients in the medical ICU who required maximal life support...

Specialist Care Crucial for Hospital Patients With Fungal Infections

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among hospitalized patients, infections with the fungus Candida are common and deadly.

In the United States, 25,000 cases occur each year, and nearly 45% of infected patients die. But a new study reports that the death rate can be cut by 20% if an infectious disease specialist takes charge of such cases.

These specia...

Could Vitamin C Infusions Save Patients With Sepsis?

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Massive vitamin C infusions could be a life-saver for patients with sepsis, an inflammatory condition run amok, new research suggests.

Sepsis is a leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals, claiming as many as 300,000 lives a year, according to the U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

"It's literally an explosion of th...

Many Poor, Minority Seniors Get Cancer Diagnosis in the ER

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are a senior who is poor or from a minority group, the chances may be higher that you could receive a cancer diagnosis in the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Cancer is typically diagnosed by a specialist, but 20% to 50% of cancers are only caught during an ER visit, researchers said.

"Emergency room detection ...

What Do Hospital Cyber Attackers Want to Know About You?

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cyber attackers who target hospital databases mostly go after patient contact and financial information, not medical records, a new study finds.

The data that hackers seek could lead to identity theft and financial fraud, according to investigators from Michigan State University in East Lansing, and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

A Kid-Friendly Emergency Room Saves Lives

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Critically ill kids are far more likely to survive if they're treated at hospital emergency rooms that are well-equipped to care for children, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 20,400 critically ill youngsters seen in ERs at 426 hospitals in Florida, Iowa, Massachusetts, Nebraska and New York state.

The risk o...

Upping Seniors' Blood Pressure Meds After Hospital Can Sometimes Bring Danger

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For seniors who've been hospitalized for non-cardiac conditions, any hike in blood pressure medications as they leave the hospital can prove dangerous, new research shows.

That's because the prescription change may not help and could do harm -- putting them at higher risk for falls and other health issues, investigators said.

"Durin...

One Man's False Teeth Got 'Lost' in His Throat After Surgery

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scheduled for surgery? Don't forget to take your dentures out.

According to a new report, one 72-year-old man who had abdominal surgery in England swallowed his dentures during the procedure.

They got stuck in his throat -- and were only discovered eight days later.

The initial surgery was to remove a harmless lump in the...

Health Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis Survivors

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis is a life-threatening infection that lands its victims in the hospital, but the dangers don't end for survivors who have high levels of inflammation long after being discharged, a new study finds.

"Sepsis is the leading cause of death among hospitalized patients. Patients discharged from the hospital aren't out of the woods yet. Approxim...

Heat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney Patients

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research uncovers yet another population that will be vulnerable to the heat waves that climate change is delivering with increasing frequency: people with kidney disease.

Extremely hot days can increase advanced kidney disease patients' risk of hospitalization and death, and climate change means they'll face more such days, the study aut...

Where Is Your Risk of Dying Greatest After Surgery?

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have noncardiac surgery are much more likely to die after they leave the hospital than in the operating room, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 40,000 adults, age 45 and older, who were operated on at 28 centers in 14 countries in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.

Of tho...

Hey! That's the Wrong Knee, Doctor

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Say you go in for knee surgery and find the surgeon operated on the wrong leg. Or you received a drug you know you're allergic to.

It happens. In fact, about 1 in 20 patients is a victim of preventable medical errors, and 12% of such cases result in permanent disability or death, researchers say.

Most preventable harm is caused...

15 Minutes Matters With Strokes

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just 15 minutes can make a difference when someone is struck by a stroke, new research suggests.

The study included more than 6,700 patients in the United States and Canada who suffered an ischemic stroke (blocked blood flow to the brain) and were treated with anti-clotting therapy.

For every 1,000 patients whose treatment began 15...

How to Make Your Child's Hospital Stay Safer, Less Stressful

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3 million kids are hospitalized in the United States every year. Whether it's for a planned test or surgery or an injury or other emergency, knowing how to be involved in your child's care can help you get through what's often a stressful event.

The single most important thing you can do is be an active member of your child's healt...

Disinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital Germ

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Standard decontamination methods may not be enough to stop a dangerous hospital bug, known as Clostridium difficile.

In a new study, researchers followed recommended procedures but found that surgical gowns, stainless steel surfaces and vinyl floors in hospitals were still contaminated with the C. difficile bacteria.

"...

Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients Home

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For the sick or elderly, a urinary tract infection (UTI) can prove deadly. With many vulnerable patients developing UTIs post-discharge, a new study suggests that better monitoring is needed after leaving the hospital.

Researchers at Oregon State University explored more than 3,000 at-risk patients. The study revealed that the risk of infectio...

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests May Be a 'Major Public Health Problem'

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many more U.S. hospital patients suffer cardiac arrest than previously thought, a new study reveals.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops beating. It differs from a heart attack, in which blood flow to the heart is blocked.

This new analysis concluded that there are about 38% more adult cases and 18% more cases in child...

Need Emergency Air Lift to Hospital? It Could Cost You $40,000

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An air ambulance might be your only chance to survive a medical emergency -- but a new study reports it's going to cost you.

The median charge of an air ambulance trip was $39,000 in 2016, about 60% more than the $24,000 charged just four years earlier, researchers found.

That amount is "more than half of the household income for...

Unnecessary Ambulance Calls in NYC Spiked After Obamacare

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of ambulances for non-emergency situations soared in New York City after the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a new study finds.

With the advent of Obamacare -- and expanded access to Medicaid -- out-of-pocket costs for an ambulance dropped sharply for many people, making them more likely to ask for one in non-emergency situations, the research...

Meet 'Huggable,' the Robot Bear Who's Helping Hospitalized Kids

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of s...

Med Students' Smartphones Loaded With Staph, Other Germs

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones have become an essential part of modern medicine, but they might be exposing patients to potentially deadly staph infections, a new study suggests.

Tests of cellphones at a Brazilian medical school revealed that 40% carried Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of hospital infections.

Worse, 85% of the bact...

Flying Insects in Hospitals Carry 'Superbug' Germs

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many flies and flying insects in hospitals carry bacteria that could pose an infection risk to patients, and more than half of them carry the types that resist antibiotics, a new study says.

British researchers used ultraviolet-light flytraps, electronic fly killers and sticky traps to collect nearly 20,000 flies, aphids, ants, wasps, bees and...

Many Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care workers are still on the job even if they have symptoms of a cold, flu or other respiratory infection, putting patients and coworkers at risk, a new study finds.

It included more than 2,700 health care workers at nine Canadian hospitals who completed online diaries whenever they had symptoms of a respiratory infection.

...

Opioids Prescribed in Hospital Often Tied to Long-Term Use

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People given opioids for the first time in the hospital are likely to continue getting them for months after, a new study reports.

A University of Pittsburgh team found that those first-timers are twice as likely to receive more opioids after discharge than patients who were not given opioids (such as oxycodone) in the hospital.

"I ...

Patient Catches on Fire During Heart Surgery

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having emergency heart surgery is always risky, but a new case report reveals an unexpected danger: A flash fire ignited a man's chest during such a procedure.

A 60-year-old man underwent lifesaving heart surgery for a torn aorta, the main artery that carries blood away from the heart.

The patient had chronic obstructive pulmonary di...

Senior Falls a Key Factor for Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fall-related injuries are a major reason why seniors are readmitted to the hospital within a month after being discharged, a new study finds.

"Falls are a trifecta in terms of reasons why they need an increased focus," said principal investigator Geoffrey Hoffman, an assistant professor in the University of Michigan's School of Nursing. "They a...

Heroin ODs Have Started Declining in Some States

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After years of steady increases, the number of Americans showing up in emergency departments with heroin overdoses is on a downswing, at least in some states.

Between 2017 and 2018, many states saw a dramatic drop in the number of people being rushed to hospitals as a result of a heroin overdose, according to a new report from the U.S. Center...

Quieter NICUs a Good Rx for Premature Babies

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Shhhhh. Preterm infants can benefit from quiet times in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), a new study says.

High noise levels are known to harm health, and infants in NICUs are especially vulnerable, so some NICUs have created quiet times to limit potentially dangerous noise levels, according to the Acoustical Society of...

Post-Hospital Low Blood Sugar a Danger to Diabetics

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are a diabetes patient, can having low blood sugar levels when you are discharged from the hospital be dangerous to your health?

That's what a new study discovered: Those patients had a 40% increased risk of readmission and an increased risk of early death.

"We found that patients with diabetes who are discharged with low...

Quick Test Helps Predict Hospital Readmission Risk After Heart Attack

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly heart attack survivors, how well they perform on a simple mobility test could help predict whether they will be back in the hospital within a month, researchers say.

Nearly one in five of these heart patients are readmitted with complications such as heart failure, bleeding or irregular heart beat within 30 days after leaving the...

Do Hospitals Have Flu's Spread Under Control?

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many hospital workers and patients spread the flu before they show any symptoms, a new study says.

The bottom line: Current flu infection control measures in hospitals may be inadequate, the Swiss researchers say.

"Our findings suggest that influenza infection in acute care is common and a significant proportion of individuals appea...

'Superbugs' Hang Out on Hospital Patients

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you weren't already worried enough about what germs lurk in hospitals, a new study shows 'superbugs' are common on patients and the things they touch.

Even worse, these bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics, the researchers added.

"Hand hygiene narrative has largely focused on physicians, nurses and other frontline staf...

Kids' ER Visits for Swallowing Toys, Foreign Objects Have Doubled Since 1990s

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 100 kids a day are rushed to U.S. emergency rooms after accidentally swallowing a toy piece, battery, magnet or other foreign object, according to new research.

That's almost twice as many as in the mid-1990s.

"The sheer number of these injuries is cause for concern," said Dr. Danielle Orsagh-Yentis, lead author of the study p...

Hospital Privacy Curtains Could Be Breeding Ground for Germs

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Privacy curtains in hospital rooms might offer patients some personal dignity, but they can also harbor dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria.

That's the claim of a new study where researchers took more than 1,500 samples from privacy curtains in 625 rooms at six skilled nursing facilities in Michigan. The samples were collected from the parts ...