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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: High Blood Pressure".

29 Apr

Work Stress and Poor Sleep a Killer?

Stressed-out workers with high blood pressure and impaired sleep at high risk of death.

Health News Results - 217

'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent It

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no cure for a-fib, but the common heart disorder can be managed, an expert says.

Atrial fibrillation -- which can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications -- affects as many as 6 million people in the United States. It's more common in whites than in blacks and Hispanics, and more common among m...

Heart Experts Support Use of Prescription Fish Oil to Lower Triglyceride Levels

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart experts are advising that prescription-strength fish oil pills might help lower excess levels of blood fats known as triglycerides.

The pills contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. When prescribed by a doctor, these meds can lower high triglyceride levels by 20%-30%, according to a new American Heart Association science advis...

More Than Half of Younger Patients Skip or Quit Blood Pressure Meds

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure can be a killer. But a new study finds that more than half of younger patients -- those under 65 -- who are prescribed high blood pressure meds either stop taking them within a few months or don't take them as prescribed.

But stopping treatment can prove dangerous, even for the relatively young, the study's lead author w...

AHA News: Rising Blood Pressure Puts Women At Greater Stroke Risk Than Men

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- As the severity of high blood pressure rises, the risk of stroke rises almost twice as quickly in women compared with men, according to a new study.

Published Tuesday in the journal Hypertension, the research raises the question of whether sex-specific guidelines may be needed for controlling high blood pressure.

...

Tight Blood Pressure Control Could Help Save Aging Brains

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Staying sharp and warding off dementia might rely, in part, on doing your best to keep high blood pressure at bay.

So finds a new study that suggests strict control of hypertension may help prevent dementia.

In the study, researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) used MRIs to scan the br...

Plants on Your Plate Will Protect Your Heart

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pile those vegetables and fruits high when you sit down to eat, and your heart will thank you.

A diet rich in plant-based foods translated into fewer heart problems in a new study.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data collected from more than 10,000 middle-aged U.S. adults who were followed from 1987 through 2016. None had...

'Selfies' Might Someday Track Your Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking your blood pressure may become as easy as taking a video selfie if a new smartphone app proves itself.

High blood pressure can be a warning sign of a heart attack or stroke, but half of those with hypertension don't know it. Developing an easy at-home blood pressure screen could potentially save lives.

A new technology called ...

High Blood Pressure Much More Deadly for the Poor

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure exacts a far greater toll on poor people than it does on affluent Americans, a new, national study finds.

The data from the clinical trial, which was designed to treat high blood pressure (hypertension), showed that poor people were half as likely to have their blood pressure controlled over the course of six years. They...

Trying to Avoid a Second Stroke? Blood Pressure Control Is Key

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you've already had one stroke, your risk for another is much higher. But new research found that well-controlled blood pressure can reduce that risk by about 20%.

The study authors suggested maintaining a blood pressure of 130/80 mm Hg or less.

"Intensive blood pressure control of at least less than 130/80 mm Hg is recommende...

One Gene Change 2 Million Years Ago Left Humans Vulnerable to Heart Attack

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As far as scientists know, humans are the only species that get heart attacks linked to clogged arteries.

Now, new research suggests that just one DNA change occurring 2 to 3 million years ago may be to blame.

The finding might give insight into how to prevent and treat the attacks, according to researchers at the University of Calif...

The Latest on Caffeine Limits

MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It seems as though every day brings yet another study on the effects of caffeine or coffee in particular. Researchers have looked at its effects on almost every aspect of health, from overall mortality to the heart, bones, kidneys, liver, fertility and more.

Sometimes, separate studies on the same aspect of caffeine consumption have contradict...

The 'Bottom' Blood Pressure Number Matters, Too

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to blood pressure readings, the "top" number seems to grab all the attention.

But a large, new study confirms that both numbers are, in fact, critical in determining the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Blood pressure measurements are given as a "top" and "bottom" number. The first reflects systolic blood pressure, th...

High Blood Pressure, 'Bad' Cholesterol Risky for Young, Too

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Act sooner rather than later to prevent heart disease, a new study suggests. This means young adults should not put off treating high blood pressure or unhealthy cholesterol levels.

The study involved more than 36,000 Americans. It came to some sobering conclusions about young adults with high blood pressure or elevated LDL cholesterol (the "b...

Just 300 Fewer Calories a Day Brings a Health Benefit

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you trim out only 300 calories a day -- the equivalent of six Oreo cookies -- that could be all it takes to cut diabetes and heart disease risk, new research suggests.

In the study, just over 200 adults younger than 50 with a healthy weight or just a few extra pounds were told to reduce their calorie intake by 25% for two years. Their a...

Exercising When You Have High Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, July 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure is a serious risk factor for heart disease, stroke and other life-threatening medical conditions. While many people need medication and dietary changes to control their blood pressure, exercise is a key component of nearly every management plan.

Scientists know that exercise causes the body to adapt in ways that lower blood ...

Where a Woman's Fat Lies Hints at Future Heart Troubles

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an older woman, your heart disease risk might be shaped by the shape of your body.

Researchers report that if you look more like an apple than a pear, your chances of heart trouble are heightened, even if you are a normal weight.

Interestingly, women who carried their weight in their legs had a significantly lower ri...

Air Pollution Bad News for Your Blood Pressure

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In yet another finding that shows air pollution is bad for more than just your lungs, a new study suggests long-term exposure could raise your risk of high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome includes a number of health conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

In this study, res...

Even Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure Early in Pregnancy a Bad Sign

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even a small increase in blood pressure during your first trimester could spell bigger trouble later in your pregnancy, new research suggests.

Those troubles can include gestational high blood pressure, which develops after the 20th week of pregnancy, and preeclampsia (high blood pressure and protein in the urine), the researchers explained....

Just 30 Minutes of Light Exercise a Week May Keep Deadly Stroke at Bay

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just a little exercise may help protect you against a type of deadly bleeding stroke, a new study suggests.

As many as half of people who suffer a subarachnoid hemorrhage die within three months.

While smoking and high blood pressure have been shown to increase the risk of this deadly stroke, there has been little evidence on whe...

AHA News: Genetics May Help Predict the Right Blood Pressure Drug for You

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Medication can play a huge role in reducing high blood pressure, a leading cause of stroke, heart attack and other serious health problems. Yet given the wide selection of drugs for doctors to choose from, figuring out which drug works best for someone is difficult.

But researchers may have found a better way to predict the ...

AHA News: Half of U.S. Adults Should Monitor Blood Pressure at Home, Study Says

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Some people go to the doctor and find the intake so nerve-wracking their blood pressure spikes. Others find the routine relaxing, as they're asked to rest for a moment and breathe easy before a blood pressure cuff is wrapped around their arm.

People with borderline hypertension in both categories should confirm the readings b...

Common Blood Pressure Med Might Help Fight Alzheimer's

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with blood pressure medication can improve blood flow to a key brain region in people with Alzheimer's disease, a small clinical trial has found.

Researchers stressed that they do not know whether the brain finding can translate into any benefits for patients. But future studies should look into that possibility, they said.

Overweight Kids Are at Risk for High Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight preschoolers have twice the odds of developing high blood pressure by age 6, putting them at risk of heart attack and stroke later in life.

And those odds begin building as early as age 4, a new study reports.

"The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health pro...

High Blood Pressure at Doctor's Office May Be More Dangerous Than Suspected

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you dread seeing the doctor and your blood pressure reading always seems to be high at the doctor's office, a new review says you should take those elevated readings seriously.

The problem is called white-coat hypertension (because of doctors' traditional white coats) and it may signal an underlying problem.

The research defined...

American Soldiers' Hearts in Worse Shape Than Civilians'

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research shatters the image of U.S. soldiers as the epitome of fitness and primed for battle: Instead, they are less likely to have ideal blood pressure than their civilian counterparts.

In fact, less than one-third of active Army personnel have ideal blood pressure (120/80 mm Hg), compared with over half of the general population, the ...

HIV Patients More Likely to Have Heart Troubles, But Less Access to Care

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what amounts to a double whammy for those living with HIV, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says these patients face higher heart risks but also major barriers to health care.

Three-quarters of people in the United States with HIV are older than 45 and have significant health problems at earlier ages than people without...

How Much Coffee Is Too Much?

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From cappuccinos to cold brew, coffee is a morning must for many Americans, but is it healthy and how much is too much?

A University of South Australia study suggests a couple of cups to start your day probably won't hurt -- and may even be good for you. But drinking six or more cups of coffee a day can increase your risk of heart disease by up...

Vaping May Exact a Toll on Blood Vessel Health

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In yet another sign that electronic cigarettes are far from harmless, a new lab study suggests that vaping damages the cells that line the inside walls of blood vessels and could hasten heart trouble.

Lab-grown endothelial cells were more likely to die off or suffer from impaired function when exposed to e-cigarette vapor, the researchers rep...

AHA News: Report Seeks Answers About Mysterious, Dangerous Heart Disease in Kids

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- After an uneventful pregnancy, Amanda Blanchfield thought she had delivered a healthy baby, a boy she and her husband named Cash.

A slight heart murmur clued doctors that there was a problem. An echocardiogram uncovered cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle.

In Cash's case, an obstruction made it hard for b...

Good Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar Levels Can Prevent 'Heart Block'

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Keeping blood pressure and blood sugar levels under control might prevent a common heart rhythm disorder called "heart block."

That's the finding from a new study analyzing data on more than 6,000 people, aged 30 and older, in Finland.

In the study, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) researchers found that 58 of thos...

AHA News: Many With High Blood Pressure Aren't Worried. Should They Be?

FRIDAY, May 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- High blood pressure is known as the "silent killer" because there are no obvious warning signs.

That might explain why nearly half of people diagnosed with it aren't worried about having a heart attack or stroke, according to a new survey. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, greatly increases the chances of having...

Diet for Blood Pressure May Also Reduce Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The DASH diet's mission is to fight high blood pressure. But a new study suggests that the eating plan may also significantly lower the risk of heart failure in people younger than 75.

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The diet is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, poultry, fish and low-fat dairy products. I...

AHA News: This May Be Why Slashing Salt Lowers Blood Pressure

MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Slash sodium from your diet. That's the advice inevitably given to everyone.

Restricting sodium intake has been key to reducing blood pressure. Now researchers may have found an underlying mechanism to explain why.

Scientists examined hundreds of metabolites substances produced during digestion from blood samples ...

Americans' Prescription Med Use Is Declining

WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bucking a longstanding upward trend, new data shows that the percentage of Americans taking any prescription drug has fallen slightly over the past decade.

Still, nearly half -- 45.8% -- of Americans said they took at least one prescription medicine over the past month, according to a national survey conducted in 2015-2016.

Tha...

AHA News: Could Adding Minerals to Drinking Water Fight High Blood Pressure?

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- If you have high blood pressure, chances are you've been told to cut back on salt. You might even be taking medication. These are good strategies, as nearly half of all adults in the United States work to keep hypertension at bay.

What if there were an easier way to make sure nearly everyone took at least one small step toward...

Weight Before Pregnancy Most Important to Risk for Complications

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Expectant mothers and doctors have focused a lot on how much a woman gains during pregnancy, but new research suggests how much a woman weighs before getting pregnant may be far more important.

The study found that the more a woman weighed at the start of her pregnancy, the more likely she was to experience complications such as high bl...

U.S. Heart Failure Rates Are Rising, Especially for Black Adults

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people are terrified of having a heart attack, but they might also need to worry about heart failure, particularly if they are black.

After years of decline and despite treatment advances, the risk of dying early from heart failure-related causes started increasing after 2012, new research shows. Black men seem especially hard hit by this ...

The Surprising Lead Cause of Death for Pregnant Women

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A major medical group has issued new guidance on detecting and treating the leading cause of death in pregnant women and new mothers in the United States.

Heart disease accounts for 26.5% of pregnancy-related deaths, and rates are highest among black women and those with low incomes. On Friday, the American College of Obstetricians and Gyne...

AHA News: Regular Low-Level Radiation Exposure Raises High Blood Pressure Risk

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation -- like the type emitted by X-ray machines and CT scanners -- can increase the risk of developing high blood pressure, a key contributor to heart disease and stroke, a new study has found.

Researchers examined the health records of more than 22,300 workers at the Mayak Production Associa...

AHA News: Study Backs Lower Blood Pressure Target for People With Diabetes

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- While doctors have been divided about what level of blood pressure is safe for someone with diabetes, a new study suggests that more intensive intervention is better.

During the study, people with Type 2 diabetes who received treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 or below had fewer heart attacks, strokes a...

Work Stress, Poor Sleep, High Blood Pressure a Deadly Trio

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Job stress, high blood pressure and poor sleep may be a recipe for an early death, German researchers report.

In a study of nearly 2,000 workers with high blood pressure who were followed for almost 18 years, those who reported having both a stressful job and poor sleep were three times more likely to die from heart disease than those who sl...

Heart Patients Pay the Price When Nearby Pharmacy Closes

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a neighborhood pharmacy shuts down, it could have dire repercussions for heart patients living nearby, new research suggests.

That's because such closures could mean patients skip or stop taking the prescriptions they need to stay healthy and safe, according to a team from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

"These findings ...

New Evidence That Veggies Beat Steak for Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your heart will thank you if you replace red meat with healthy plant proteins.

Doing so will lower your odds for heart disease, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from 36 trials involving more than 1,800 people to learn how different diets affected heart disease risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol, t...

Why More Patients Are Surviving an Aneurysm

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments mean aneurysms are no longer an automatic death sentence, specialists say.

Aneurysms are a weakening or bulging of blood vessels that can rupture and become life-threatening. They can occur anywhere in the body, but are most common in the brain, or in the main blood vessels that lead to the heart, legs and arms.

Aneur...

Pros, Cons to Multiple Meds for Nursing Home Residents

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's an upside and a downside to prescribing nursing home residents a long list of medicines, new research confirms.

Taking multiple meds can boost a resident's odds of survival after a heart attack, for example, but it may also lower their ability to safely perform daily activities, researchers reported April 9 in the journal Circulati...

FDA Says Patients Can Take Tainted Blood Pressure Meds Until Shortages End

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Americans face shortages of widely used blood pressure drugs due to contamination with potentially cancer-causing impurities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said patients can safely take the tainted drugs in the short term.

As the agency explained, the risk of stroke and other problems from stopping the angiotensin II rec...

AHA News: Kids With High Blood Pressure Need Smooth Transition to Adult Care

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- A child diagnosed with high blood pressure should continue seeking treatment when he or she becomes an adult -- and a newly published review looks at the medical guidelines that can help with the transition.

A comparison of the separate blood pressure guidelines for children and adults found that efforts to bridge the care th...

AHA News: Could Beetroot Fight Salt-Induced High Blood Pressure?

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Adding tiny amounts of beetroot or dietary nitrate to salty food products might help prevent high blood pressure, according to a preliminary study of rats.

While findings in animals may not translate to humans, researchers of the new study -- released Thursday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension -...

Heart Attacks Fall By One-Third Among Older Americans

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A groundbreaking new study holds heartening news for older Americans.

Since the mid-1990s, the number of seniors who suffered a heart attack or died from one dropped dramatically -- evidence that campaigns to prevent heart attacks and improve patient care are paying off, Yale University researchers said.

The study of more than 4 mil...

Heart Care Guidelines Rarely Backed by Top-Notch Science

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Precious few treatment guidelines for heart patients are supported by the best scientific evidence, a new study shows.

Less than one in 10 recommendations are based on results from multiple randomized controlled trials (considered the "gold standard"), and that percentage has actually dropped in the past decade, the researchers reported.

...

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