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05 Aug

Is it Safe io Send My College Kid Back to Campus?

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Health News Results - 106

Later School Start Times Mean Better-Rested Kids: Study

Starting the school day a little later helps middle and high school students get more and better sleep, according to a new study.

The research is based on annual surveys of about 28,000 elementary, middle and high school students and their parents. The surveys were completed before and two years after school start times were changed.

Changes to sleep cycles during puberty make it ha...

Americans Are Eating Less Healthily Everywhere, Except at School

Taking a deep dive into how Americans eat, a new dietary analysis finds that no matter where people get their food, bad nutrition rules the day, with one key exception: schools.

The conclusion is based on surveys conducted among 61,000 adults and children between 2003 and 2018. Respondents' answers revealed that the quality of much of the food they've been getting from restaurants, grocer...

Kids With Autism Can Really Benefit From Exercise

FRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Being active is good for most everyone, and new studies now show it can help kids with autism manage common behavioral issues.

"Exercise goes beyond health-related benefits and increased levels of fitness for those with autism," said David Geslak, a pioneer in using exercise to help kids with autism. "Research shows that exercise can increase foc...

Nearly 8 in 10 School, Child Care Staff Have Gotten at Least 1 Dose of COVID Vaccine: CDC

In findings that bode well for the full reopening of schools across America, a new government survey shows that nearly 80 percent of school employees and child care workers have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine.

Released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday, the latest figures came as the Biden administration pushes to reopen schools by...

More Kids With Autism May Be Doing Well Than Thought

School-age children with autism may be faring better than commonly thought, with most "doing well" in at least some aspects of development, a new study suggests.

The study, of 272 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), found that nearly 80% were doing well in at least one of five developmental areas by age 10. Nearly one-quarter were doing well in four of those areas.

The res...

Teen Pot Use Could Mean Less Success as Adult

Teenage pot use can hamper a kid's future chances of landing a good job with a large salary, mainly by interfering with his or her education, a new study of twins has found.

A teenager who uses more marijuana than their identical twin is less likely to wind up in a highly skilled occupation with better pay than their brother or sister, according to the report.

That's not because pot...

Whatever the Language, Babies LOVE Baby Talk

There's a reason you may choose to talk in singsong tones and with exaggerated sounds when you're talking to babies -- they're more likely to listen.

New research shows that babies pay more attention to baby talk than to regular speech. The finding held in many languages, and even when the baby was bilingual.

"Crucially for parents, we found that development of learning and attent...

Nearly Half of U.S. Schools Now Offer In-Person Learning

Nearly half of the public schools in America are now holding in-person classes, with white children far more likely to be in those classrooms than Black, Hispanic or Asian students, the first federal data on the state of education during the pandemic shows.

The survey, released early Wednesday, suggests the nation is moving toward a goal set by President Joe Biden for a reopening of ...

Another Study Finds COVID Doesn't Spread in Schools With Proper Safeguards

COVID-19 transmission is rare in schools that follow precautions such as mandatory masks, social distancing and frequent hand-washing, a new study finds.

And that's true even among close school contacts of people who test positive for the new coronavirus, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Schools can operate safely during a pandemic ...

CDC Says 3 Feet of Social Distancing Now OK in Most Classrooms

In a move that should make reopening schools an easier task, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday lowered its social distancing recommendation for most classrooms to 3 feet.

That should enable many schools to keep all students enrolled in a class within the same room.

"[The] CDC is committed to leading with science and updating our guidance as new evidence...

Does Too Much 'Screen Time' Have Your Preschooler Acting Out?

Preschoolers who spend a lot of time watching movies and shows on TVs and other screens are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems by age 5, a Finnish study warns.

But despite their reputation, video games did not appear to promote any emotional problems in youngsters, researchers concluded.

"We found that high levels of screen time at the age of 1.5 years is relat...

Virtual Learning Has Taken a Toll on Kids' & Parents' Mental Health

A new government report confirms what many moms and dads already know: Parents and kids are struggling mightily to cope with the stresses of distance learning.

A survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of parents of children aged 5 to 12 found that parents of kids receiving in-person instruction were less likely to suffer from stress than those whose school...

Is Your Teen Unmotivated at School? That Might Change

If your teen seems disinterested in school, new research suggests there's a good chance that things will get better over time.

"Our results point to a more hopeful picture for students who start out with lower levels of motivation," said study senior author Kui Xie, a professor of educational studies at Ohio State University in Columbus

The study included 1,670 students at 11 public...

College Students With ADHD Have Lower Grades, Higher Dropout Rates

College students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a harder time making it to graduation than their peers do, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that of 400 students they followed, those with ADHD had a lower grade-point average (GPA) -- about half a grade lower -- than students without the disorder. The gap emerged freshman year, and persisted throughout coll...

Stressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't Working

For Morgan Compton, 7, who has attended school remotely for nearly a year, the stress of the pandemic manifests itself in meltdowns.

On one particular day, Morgan "threw a fit and decided to go upstairs," said her mother, Tracy Compton. Hearing the sound of his daughter's tears, Compton's husband, John, who also works from home, got involved.

Meltdowns are familiar to any paren...

Education Level Now Prime Driver of COVID Vaccine Hesitancy: Poll

In the early weeks of the U.S. vaccine rollout, race looked like it would determine who was willing to get a shot in the arm, but education level now plays the most powerful role in that decision, new research shows.

More than three-quarters of adults with at least a bachelor's degree have been vaccinated or plan to be, compared to 53% of those without a college degree, according to a new...

Pandemic Is Adding to Teachers' Stress, and Quit Rates

Stress is the No. 1 reason U.S. teachers left the profession before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll reveals.

Nearly 1,000 former public school teachers were polled in December. Three-quarters said their job was often or always stressful during their final year in the classroom.

Stress was nearly twice as common as poor pay as a reason for quitting, according to the resu...

Teachers Main Drivers of School COVID Outbreaks, So Vaccinations Needed: Study

In the wake of U.S. recommendations to re-open schools, a new government report indicates that teachers may be key spreaders of COVID-19 in schools and should be vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that educators were responsible for recent clusters of COVID-19 in suburban Atlanta schools. Teacher vaccination should th...

Meeting the Challenges of Type 1 Diabetes in the Teen Years

Diabetes is never an easy disease to manage, but coping with type 1 diabetes can be a particularly difficult challenge for teens.

The transition from childhood to adolescence can be hard on both kids and parents, the JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) says.

As boys and girls with type 1 diabetes enter puberty they undergo lots of changes, including increases i...

Lockdowns Are Leaving Kids With ADHD in Crisis

When clinical psychologist Maggie Sibley thinks about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, she worries most about the older teens who may drop out of high school and those kids who may be experiencing depression.

It would be hard to argue that this year hasn't been difficult for everyone, and that may be even mor...

U.S. Schools Can Reopen, With Safeguards in Place: CDC

It may be safe for many of America's kids to head back to classrooms, experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Friday.

According to the agency's new operational guidance, schools can safely reopen if they employ five key "layered mitigation" strategies based on the level of COVID-19 transmission in their communities. Those strategies include steps such ...

There's 'A Path Forward' to Reopening Schools, CDC Officials Say

With most in-person classes curtailed or canceled in schools across the United States since last spring, kids and their parents have had a really tough year.

However, new studies suggest a return to in-person classes could be warranted, according to officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Writing in the Jan. 26 issue of the Journal of the American ...

Health Care After COVID: Racial Disparities Laid Bare

Deidre Johnson spends her days leading a center that provides resources to help Black people in her community overcome health disparities and other societal challenges.

She understands the impact this can have. As a mother of two and a Black woman, Johnson faced discrimination in the hospital when her sons were born and she experienced postpartum preeclampsia, a serious medical condi...

3 Steps Could Nearly Eliminate COVID Infections on College Campuses: Study

A combination of mask use, social distancing and routine testing would eliminate nearly all COVID-19 infections on U.S. college campuses, a new study claims.

Using a computer model that simulated a semester of a mid-sized college (5,000 students and 1,000 faculty), researchers assessed the effectiveness and cost of 24 combinations of four common preventive strategies: social distancing; m...

Pediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety Measures

A prominent U.S. doctors' group reaffirmed its recommendation this week that having kids physically in school should be the goal, while also outlining safety protocols needed to allow schools to be open.

In its COVID-19 guidance for safe schools, the American Academy of Pediatrics listed measures communities need to address. These include controlling the spread of COVID-19 in the communit...

Parents Feel the Strain as Pandemic Adds New Role: Teacher

New York City mom and author Lyss Stern spends most of her weekdays trying to help her three children learn remotely, and things are not going smoothly for any of them.

"There are a lot of moving parts, and I feel like I am constantly being an octopus," she said. "Are they learning enough? Are they challenged? Are missed assignments piling up? Are they looking at TikTok on their phone und...

Pandemic Fuels Interest in Careers in Infectious Disease

As scientists have labored to understand COVID-19 and develop a vaccine to combat it, interest in infectious disease careers seems to be growing.

Academic leaders from the United States and Israel have noted the increased interest among medical students.

"We just went through an applications season for fellows, and we had more applicants than in recent years," said Richard D'Aquila,...

Schools, Day Care Not a Big Factor in Kids Getting COVID: Study

As a rule, COVID-19 spreads rapidly in most groups, but new research suggests that schools and day care centers appear to be the exception.

Among those under 18, the virus is easily spread by close contact with family members who have COVID-19 and at gatherings where people don't wear masks, but going to school wasn't linked to positive COVID-19 tests, according to the researchers.

...

Which Masks Hamper Communication the Least?

While teachers and students are adapting in some locations to wearing face masks for in-person learning, those masks can make speech more difficult to understand, new research suggests.

Investigators compared a three-layer fabric mask, a surgical mask and an N95 mask in two classroom settings. The fabric masks made comprehension most difficult. Therefore, the researchers recommended that ...

Later School Start Time, Fewer Migraines for Teens?

Later school start times for teenagers might help those who struggle with migraines, a new study suggests.

Starting school later in the morning could reduce the number of migraines each month for these students, the researchers said. The delayed start would be a nod to teens' later-to-bed, later-to-rise body clocks.

"Evidence suggests that there is a relationship between sleep and ...

Why Kindergarten Matters

Being well-prepared to start kindergarten provides lifelong benefits, a new Canadian study shows.

It included 2,000 children born in the province of Quebec in 1997 and 1998. At age 5, their knowledge of numbers and their receptive vocabulary (recognition of written or spoken words) was assessed. Their kindergarten teachers also reported on the children's classroom engagement, such as how ...

Your Teachers May Have Been Key to Your Adult Mental Health

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2020 (Health Day News) -- Great teachers can make a big difference in their students' long-term health, research shows.

Teenagers who had good, supportive relationships with their teachers became healthier adults, according to a new report.

"This research suggests that improving students' relationships with teachers could have important, positive and long-lasting eff...

Depressed Teens May Struggle in School

By about age 16, teens diagnosed with depression have substantially lower educational attainment, a new British study finds.

Targeted educational support might be of particular benefit to teens from poor backgrounds and boys, but all children with depression can benefit from such help, the study authors suggested.

For the study, the researchers used British health and edu...

As Schools Reopen, Many Students, Staff Live With High-Risk Family Member

School districts across America are navigating exactly how to resume classes this fall, just as a new study warns that many students and teachers live in homes with people at high risk for severe COVID-19.

"For many school districts, decisions over whether and how to reopen will likely be revisited throughout the school year … [and] evidence regarding the health risks of adults...

Are At-Home 'Learning Pods' the Right Fit for Your Family?

Emily Davis and her husband started a "learning pod" with another family this summer, hiring a teacher for child care and now for the start of first grade. Their 6-year-old son is an only child, which was a big factor in the decision. The other family has two kids.

"It might be a full school year [of distance learning]. Then it's really just not OK for an only child to see no other ch...

Does TV And Computer Time Affect Kids' Math, Reading?

Children who spend too much time on computers or watching TV may have poorer reading and math skills, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed school test data of more than 1,200 Australian children when they were 8 and 9 years of age and again two years later. Parents were asked about their child's use of electronic media.

Kids who watched two or more hours of TV a day at ag...

AHA News: As the Coronavirus Upends Schools, Experts Say Don't Forget the Arts

For some parents and schools, education amid a pandemic will mean a focus on reading, writing and arithmetic. But brain experts say don't forget the singing, dancing and painting.

Arts education often is seen as a frill. But research shows it boosts educational performance. Exposure to the arts can have direct and indirect benefits to mental and physical health. Far from being a luxu...

Play It Safe With Allergies, Asthma During Pandemic School Year

As parents deal with the uncertainty surrounding school this year, allergies and asthma may not be top of their minds.

But even during a pandemic, parents of children with allergies and asthma need to consider the added risks their children may face, one allergist says.

Many school districts "are still trying to determine how kids will return to school this fall," said J. ...

Help Your Child Cope With Back-to-School Jitters

Back-to-school season can be a time of stress for many kids -- even in the best of times.

But pandemic fears add to the anxiety many kids will experience with the start of the 2020-2021 academic year, according to David FitzGerald, a child and adolescent psychologist at UConn Health in Farmington, Conn.

"COVID-19's continued presence for this year's back-to-school season wil...

Help Your Kids Navigate School Amid a Pandemic

This school year comes with special challenges for kids as the United States grapples with a coronavirus pandemic, but experts say parents can help their children navigate the tough emotional terrain.

Whether returning to a school building, continuing online learning or adjusting to a hybrid school environment, it is normal for children and adolescents to have some stress or anxiety ...

Education Benefits the Brain Over a Lifetime

A new study confirms what your parents always told you: Getting an education opens the door to career opportunities and higher salaries. But it may also benefit your well-being in old age.

"The total amount of formal education that people receive is related to their average levels of cognitive [mental] functioning throughout adulthood," said researcher Elliot Tucker-Drob, from the Un...

Frequent COVID Tests Key to College Reopening: Experts

Regular testing to catch "silent" COVID-19 spread among students will be key to safely reopening colleges this fall, campus infection control experts say.

Extensive modeling suggests that testing college students for COVID every two to three days using a low-cost, less accurate test would be the best strategy for campuses to safely reopen this fall, according to research led by David ...

Strict, Costly Measures Needed to Reopen Schools: Study

As debate intensifies over reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic, Stanford University experts offer some tips to make the return to classrooms safer.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has highlighted the importance of kids returning to the classrooms.

"Prolonged school closures can exacerbate socioeconomic disparities, causing negative education and health outcome...

More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer's

Among people who have the gene that carries a heightened risk for early-onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests that more education might slow the development of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain.

About 1% to 6% of people with Alzheimer's disease have genes that put them at risk for early development of the disease, which can start in their 30s to 50s, the researcher...

Mastering the Violin Won't Help Your Child Master Math: Study

All the parents who force their children to play an instrument because it has been touted as a way to boost overall intelligence, take note.

New research now suggests that it may not help develop memory, math, reading and writing skills after all.

Earlier studies trying to pinpoint the value of music training on cognitive and academic performance have been conflicting, the r...

'Jeopardy' Host Alex Trebek Tells Fans Cancer Treatments Are 'Paying Off'

FRIDAY, July 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Fans of "Jeopardy" host Alex Trebek got a health update for the first time in months on Thursday when he told followers that his treatments for pancreatic cancer are "paying off."

"I'm doing well," the 79-year-old host said in a video recorded at his home. "I've been continuing my treatment and it is paying off, though it does fatigue me a gr...

With Social Distancing, Schools Should Be Safe to Reopen This Fall, Experts Say

Kids should be able to safely return to reopened schools this fall, resuming their studies with little risk that they will contribute to the COVID-19 pandemic, some infectious disease experts argue.

The scientific evidence so far indicates that children do not tend to spread the novel coronavirus between themselves, nor do they appear to regularly infect adults, a new editorial in the...

The Long-Term Harm of Missing School

Missing lots of school between kindergarten and eighth grade may have consequences when kids grow up, a new study suggests.

When they reached their early 20s, frequent absentees were less likely to vote and more likely to have economic problems and poor educational outcomes, researchers found.

The results suggest early school absenteeism should be taken seriously.

...

Biases Mean Men Dubbed 'Brilliant' More Often Than Women

When it comes to intelligence, men are more likely to be bestowed with the lofty attribute than women, a new study finds.

These stereotyped views are a result of implicit bias that people don't admit when asked directly, the researchers noted.

"Stereotypes that portray brilliance as a male trait are likely to hold women back across a wide range of prestigious careers," sai...

2 in 3 Parents Would Send Kids to School in Fall: Survey

About two-thirds of U.S. parents say they'll send their kids to school again this fall, and most also support COVID-19 testing and social distancing policies for schoolchildren, a new survey finds.

Among parents, only about 12% said they would not send at least one of their kids to school, while 21% were still uncertain about their decision. Many are waiting to hear more about...

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