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Results for search "Dieting To Control Salt".

Health News Results - 24

Often Feel Bloated? One Ingredient May Be to Blame

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you often feel bloated after a meal, don't be too quick to blame high-fiber foods. The real culprit might surprise you.

Your gut may be rebelling because you're eating too much salt, a new study suggests.

"Sodium reduction is an important dietary intervention to reduce bloating symptoms and could be used to enhance compliance ...

5 Easy Ways to Cut Back Your Salt Intake

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of Americans have taken steps to cut back on salt, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation.

This often starts with comparing labels and choosing foods -- from soups to canned veggies -- with less sodium. Here are four more steps that you can take to reduce your salt intake.

You know that p...

Veggies, Fruits and Grains Keep Your Heart Pumping

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As if you needed any more proof that fruits, vegetables and whole grains are good for you, a new study finds they may cut your chances of heart failure by 41%.

Conversely, the so-called Southern diet, which focuses on meats, fried and processed foods and lots of sweet tea, was tied to a 72% increased risk of heart failure.

...

Healthy Diet Might Not Lower Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A long-running study questions the conventional wisdom that a healthy diet may help ward off dementia.

European researchers followed more than 8,200 middle-aged adults for 25 years -- looking at whether diet habits swayed the odds of being diagnosed with dementia. In the end, people who ate their fruits and vegetables were at no lower risk t...

Healthy Diet While Young, Healthy Brain in Middle Age

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who eat a heart-healthy diet may also be protecting their brain in middle age, a new study suggests.

It included more than 2,600 participants who were an average age of 25 at enrollment and followed for 30 years. They were asked about their eating habits at the beginning of the study and again seven and 20 years later.

Fast Food Delivers Even More Calories Than Decades Ago

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fast food fans today are ordering off menus that have grown more apt to make them fat.

Portion sizes have risen dramatically over the past three decades at the most popular fast food restaurants in the United States, a new study has found.

As a result, the amount of calories and excess sodium has also increased among fast food offeri...

Update Dietary Guidelines for a Healthier You

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Every five years, the U.S. government updates its dietary guidelines based in part on new research, but always with the goal of disease prevention.

The 2015-2020 guidelines stress the need to shift to healthier foods and beverages. Although research links vegetables and fruits to a lower risk of many chronic illnesses and suggests they may pro...

What's the Best Diet for 2019? Experts Weigh In

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For many, the start of the new year signals the start of a new diet. But what's the best way to eat if you want to lose weight?

For overall healthy eating, the best diet plan is the Mediterranean diet, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual diet review. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hyper...

Too Much Salt Might Help Spur A-Fib

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A high-salt diet could raise your risk for a common heart rhythm disorder, new research suggests.

Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots or other complications. It affects millions of people worldwide and puts them at higher risk for stroke and, in rare cases, can lead to heart failure.

Host a Healthy Thanksgiving Feast

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There are a number of ways you can serve up a healthier Thanksgiving meal, a nutrition expert says.

"Cut back on boxed and premade processed foods by making more dishes from scratch," said Mindy Athas. She is an outpatient dietitian nutritionist at Carroll Hospital in Westminster, Md.

Good choices for f...

Some Salads Are Healthier Than Others

FRIDAY, June 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Not all salads are created equal.

When you're choosing your bowl of greens this summer, you should know that three types contain more calories, sodium and fat than you may want, one dietitian says.

So, if you want to eat the healthiest salads possible, steer clear of taco salads, chef salads and Caesar salads.

Taco salads, ...

Mediterranean Diet Most Popular on U.S. Coasts

WEDNESDAY, May 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence linking a Mediterranean diet to a slew of health benefits is extensive and growing, but new research finds Americans in some regions aren't taking to it.

The increasingly popular eating plan emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil while limiting red meat and other saturated fats, refined sugars and processed...

Take These 5 Steps to Live 10 Extra Years

MONDAY, April 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Americans could add years to their lives with just a handful of healthy habits, a large, new study suggests.

Right now, the typical 50-year-old American can expect to live another 30 to 33 years, according to government statistics. But based on the new study, those who maintain five lifestyle habits could add roughly a decade to that life exp...

Smokers' Diets Let Them Down, Too

THURSDAY, April 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who smoke already face a greater risk of illnesses and early death, and a new study suggests their diets aren't doing their health any favors either.

The researchers found that compared to ex-smokers and people who never smoked, tobacco users have diets with a much higher energy density. Smokers consume about 200 more calories a day,...

A 'Chipped' Tooth Reveals What You Eat and Drink

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Tempted to cheat on your diet? You might want to think twice.

Tiny tooth-mounted sensors can now provide real-time information about what you eat and drink.

The technology could prove important in health care and clinical studies, according to the Tufts University School of Engineering team that developed it.

The flexi...

Want to Live Longer? Eating a Little Less Might Do the Trick

THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Putting just a bit less on your dinner plate each day might be key to a longer life, preliminary research suggests.

People who reduced their caloric intake by just 15 percent over two years experienced a significant decrease in their metabolism, according to a small clinical trial.

These folks also saw improvements in biomarkers ...

Don't Count on Healthy Foods to Blunt Salt's Harm

MONDAY, March 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An otherwise healthy diet isn't going to offset damage to your heart from too much salt, a new study suggests.

"Our latest findings show that the adverse relation of salt intake to blood pressure is not counteracted or reduced by other nutrients consumed, including about 80 that we assessed," said researcher Queenie Chan.

And since ...

Heart-Healthy 'DASH' Diet May Also Help Lower Depression Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eating plenty of vegetables, fruits and whole grains may lower your risk of depression, new research suggests.

"Making a lifestyle change -- such as changing your diet -- is often preferred over taking medications, so we wanted to see if diet could be an effective way to reduce the risk of depression," said study author Dr. Laurel Cherian, wh...

Super Bowl Snacks That Don't Put Health on the Sidelines

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Super Bowl Sunday is synonymous with greasy chicken wings, calorie-laden chili, salty potato chips and sugary brownies -- but experts say there's no reason you can't enjoy tasty fare without sending your body into a nutritional tailspin.

"On any given day, you normally consume 7 percent to 10 percent of fat as part of your total calories for th...

Many Stroke Survivors Don't Improve Health Habits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While you might think most people would try to change unhealthy behaviors after a major health scare like a stroke, new research suggests most people don't.

They may even pick up worse habits.

Fewer than 1 in 100 stroke survivors met all seven heart-health goals identified by the American Heart Association. And just 1 in 5 met fou...

What's Your Best Diet for 2018? Experts Rate Them

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your New Year's resolution diet should be based on a well-balanced eating plan that fits your lifestyle, rather than a weird fad replete with food restrictions.

That's according to U.S. News & World Report's best diet rankings for 2018. The two diets that tied for the top spot -- the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH Diet -- fit tha...

Want to Avoid Salt? Turn Up the Spice

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If your taste buds lean toward spicy, you might be doing your heart a favor, new research suggests.

Spicy foods may increase salt sensitivity, thereby dampening the desire to consume heart-harming salty food, researchers in China say.

"High salt intake increases blood pressure and contributes to cardiovascular disease," said study a...

A Healthy Diet May Help Ward Off Dementia

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Eating right may help protect your brain health in old age, a group of new studies show, according to four new studies.

In particular, the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet lowered people's risk of dementia, two studies concluded.

The MIND diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean diet and the DASH ...

Better Diet, Longer Life?

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged and older adults who start eating better also tend to live longer, a large new study shows.

The findings, reported in the July 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, might not sound surprising. Health experts said they basically reinforce messages people have been hearing for years.

But the study is th...