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Dementia Risk Rises as Years Lived With Type 2 Diabetes Increases

THURSDAY, April 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The younger people are when they develop type 2 diabetes, the higher their risk of dementia later in life, a new study suggests.

Many studies have pointed to links between diabetes and higher dementia risk. Experts say it's likely because diabetes can harm the brain in a number of ways.

Now, the new findings suggest tha...

Could a Drug Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in Those at Risk?

Just two weeks of treatment with an experimental drug can delay the onset of type 1 diabetes by several years, researchers report.

The drug, called teplizumab, is already under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration based on earlier evidence of its effectiveness.

If it gets the green light, it would become the first drug approved for delaying type 1 diabetes in high-risk pe...

U.S. Hispanics at High Heart Disease Risk and Many Go Untreated: Report

Even after suffering a stroke, many Hispanic Americans still have uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure or other conditions that raise their risk of a repeat one, a new study finds.

The study involved 404 Hispanic adults with a history of stroke or "mini-stroke," which is a brief reduction in blood flow to the brain that can foreshadow a full-blown stroke. The researchers found that ...

Meeting the Challenges of Type 1 Diabetes in the Teen Years

Diabetes is never an easy disease to manage, but coping with type 1 diabetes can be a particularly difficult challenge for teens.

The transition from childhood to adolescence can be hard on both kids and parents, the JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) says.

As boys and girls with type 1 diabetes enter puberty they undergo lots of changes, including increases i...

'Prediabetes' May Be Harming Your Brain, Study Finds

"Prediabetes" -- where blood sugar levels are high but not yet tipped over into full-blown diabetes -- may pose a threat to brain health, new British research suggests.

"As an observational study, it cannot prove higher blood sugar levels cause worsening brain health. However, we believe there is a potential connection that needs to be investigated further," said study lead author Victori...

Patients With Diabetes Need More Counseling on Low Blood Sugar

Doctors need to do a better job of discussing low blood sugar with patients who take high-risk diabetes medications such as insulin, researchers say.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common serious side effect of diabetes treatment. Severe cases can lead to falls, emergency department visits, and may increase the risk of stroke and death.

"For patients to have safe diabete...

Surgery, Drugs Similar for Treating Severe Diabetic Eye Disease

Surgery and injectable drugs are equally effective in treating a serious diabetes-related eye condition, a new study indicates.

It included 205 patients with bleeding inside the eye due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), a disorder in which new, abnormal blood vessels grow in the retina.

These blood vessels often bleed into the gel-like vitreous that fills the eye, resulti...

Type 2 Diabetes in Youth Is Especially Unhealthy: Study

The earlier in life type 2 diabetes arises, the deadlier it is, a new analysis finds.

The study, which pooled the results of 26 previous ones, revealed a clear pattern: The younger people were when they developed type 2 diabetes, the greater their risk of complications like heart disease and stroke.

For each year type 2 diabetes was delayed, the risk of blood vessel diseases fell by...

Weight-Loss Surgery Often Rids Patients of Type 2 Diabetes

Weight-loss surgery conquers type 2 diabetes in more than 50% of patients who have the procedure, new research shows.

So-called bariatric surgery helps severely obese people shed weight and improve their health. Two types of weight-loss surgery are lap band surgery (in which a band around the top of the stomach creates a pouch that can only hold a small amount of food) and gastric bypass....

'Repeat After Me' for Better Diabetes Care

Repeat this: The key to helping people with diabetes stay healthier and out of the hospital could be as simple as better communication.

And an underutilized technique called "teach-back" may make a big difference for type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients, a new study finds.

It's a simple concept: After a health care provider explains various details on treatment plans, medications a...

Spotting the Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy

Most Americans over 40 don't know the signs of diabetic retinopathy, a new survey finds.

The condition affects nearly 8 million Americans, and that number is expected to double by 2050, but most adults don't know facts about diabetic retinopathy that could help save their sight.

The survey of 1,000 U.S. adults by the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) found 47% didn't kno...

Minimally Invasive Procedure May Free Type 2 Diabetics From Insulin

A small study suggests that a new procedure that treats part of the intestine just beyond the stomach may allow people with type 2 diabetes to safely stop taking insulin.

The procedure -- which resurfaces the duodenum -- was combined with a popular kind of diabetes medication called GLP-1 receptor agonists (such as Victoza, Trulicity, Ozempic) and counseling on lifestyle factors, such a...

Has the Pandemic Changed Type 1 Diabetes Care for Good?

When the COVID-19 pandemic began, many doctors started providing care via telemedicine. Now, a new survey of people with type 1 diabetes suggests many like remote care and hope it continues in the future.

Among the survey respondents who had a telemedicine visit during the pandemic, 86% found the remote appointments useful, and 75% said they planned on having remote appointme...

Why Early Bedtime May Be Best for People With Type 2 Diabetes

It's long been said that early to bed, early to rise can make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Now, new research supports at least the health benefits.

A study of people with type 2 diabetes found that night owls -- people who go to bed late and get up late -- tend to get little exercise, putting their health at greater risk.

Understanding how sleep time can affect physical ...

Exercise Ups Life Span for Type 2 Diabetics

For someone with type 2 diabetes, exercise can cut the risk of dying early by as much as one-third, researchers report.

Exercise improves insulin sensitivity, reduces the risk of heart disease, and inhibits inflammation, said the Taiwanese research team.

Among nearly 5,000 men and women with type 2 diabetes, those with a higher level of exercise had a lower risk of dying du...

Once-a-Week Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise in Early Trial

Type 2 diabetes can be tough to control without medication. But for some people, the thought of daily shots makes them delay or avoid starting insulin therapy.

Now, new research offers some hope for those insulin avoiders -- a once-a-week insulin injection may someday replace daily shots.

A phase 2 trial compared the new weekly insulin, called icodec, to the commonly used i...

A Guide to Managing Children's Diabetes During COVID-19

Parents worry that COVID-19 can make a diabetic child's condition worse, but an expert has some tips for keeping kids healthy during the pandemic.

"If a child has good control of their diabetes, it does not seem as though there will be severe effects if they were to get the virus," said Dr. Michael Yafi, an associate professor of pediatric endocrinology at McGovern Medical School at ...

Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes in Kids 6 and Up, Clinical Trial Shows

An artificial pancreas system is safe and effective at managing blood sugar levels in kids as young as age 6 with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.

The system uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood sugar levels and automatically delivers insulin when needed using an insulin pump. It replaces reliance on fingerstick or CGM with delivery of insulin by injection ...

Pandemic Means Financial Hardship for Many With Diabetes

People with diabetes face a higher risk of developing complications from COVID-19, but a new survey reports they have also suffered more economic fallout from the pandemic.

In June, 18% of people with diabetes were out of work compared to 12% of the general population. And one-third of people with diabetes have lost at least some income since the pandemic began versus about 2...

Have Diabetes? Don't Lose Sight of Danger to Your Eyes

Diabetes can wreak havoc on many parts of the body, including the eyes, but people with diabetes aren't doomed to have vision problems.

With good blood sugar management and regular eye exams, many eye conditions can be prevented or treated, experts say.

Patricia Welter, a Pilates studio owner from Palm Harbor, Fla., wishes she'd known more about preventing eye problems rel...

AHA News: Controlling Diabetes Takes on Greater Urgency During COVID-19 Pandemic

Uncontrolled blood sugar is dangerous at any time. But with mounting evidence showing that COVID-19 places people with diabetes at higher risk for severe illness, the need to keep diabetes well-managed has become more important than ever.

"Diabetes is itself a risk factor for a more severe case of COVID-19," said Dr. Prakash Deedwania, professor of medicine at the University of Californ...

Telehealth Programs Improve Blood Sugar for Rural Americans With Diabetes

If you have diabetes and live in rural America, the closest specialist may be hours away. But new research shows that effective help may be as close as your phone.

The study found that a six-month telehealth program led to a significant drop in blood sugar levels. Participants had an average A1C level of 9.25% at the study's start and an average of 7.89% at the end. That bene...

Cost of Type 1 Diabetes: $2,500 a Year With Insurance

Out-of-pocket costs for Americans with type 1 diabetes average $2,500 a year, a new study says.

But 8% of patients have more than $5,000 in out-of-pocket costs, possibly due to having high-deductible health insurance plans or significant medical needs, researchers found.

And insulin accounted for only 18% of total out-of-pocket spending. The rest of it included cost ...

Could Your Contact Lenses Track, Treat Your Diabetes?

Contact lenses may someday do more than correct poor vision, with new, preliminary research in animals suggesting they could also monitor your diabetes and deliver medications.

The new lenses were designed to check blood sugar levels and to deliver drugs to the eye, possibly for the eye disease related to diabetes called diabetic retinopathy. After trying them out on rabbits, scienti...

AHA News: Managing Diabetes Risk in Hispanic, Asian Communities

People living with diabetes are twice as likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, heart attack and stroke. While it's not a new statistic, it does resonate in Hispanic and Asian communities in the United States, where 1 in 5 adults has diabetes, diagnosed or not.

Recent research gives a more detailed glimpse into how specific ethnic communities share the burd...

What People With Type 1 Diabetes Need to Know About COVID-19

If you or your child has type 1 diabetes, you already have a lot of extra health worries, and now you need to add COVID-19 infections to the list.

You may be wondering if you have a higher risk of catching COVID-19, if you'll be able to get your diabetes supplies and how you might handle the illness if you do get sick.

Here's some information to...

Family Ties Help Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Flourish

Type 1 diabetes is a challenging, time-intensive disease that often strikes children, and new research suggests that strong family support helps improve the well-being of young adults with the condition.

The study found that young adults (under 30) with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be "flourishing" if they had good family connections. Flourishing was defined in the study as h...

Patch Pump Device Could Offer Cheaper Insulin Delivery

Rising prices have grabbed headlines as people struggle to afford their lifesaving insulin, but new research may have found an alternative for people with type 2 diabetes.

The study found that combining a wearable, patch-like insulin delivery device (called the V-Go) and an older, cheaper insulin could safely help people with type 2 diabetes achieve good blood sugar control.

...

Blood Sugar Control May Aid Stroke Recovery in Diabetes Patients

Good blood sugar control can help protect against mental decline after a common type of stroke in people with diabetes, new research suggests.

The study included 942 patients with diabetes who suffered a lacunar stroke -- one caused by a blockage in an artery that provides blood to the brain's deep structures.

Better blood sugar (glucose) control was associated with better m...

New Tool Helps Muslims With Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar During Ramadan Fast

A new tool can help Muslims with diabetes safely control their blood sugar during the intermittent fasting of Ramadan, according to researchers.

The FAST (Fasting Algorithm for Singaporeans with Type 2 Diabetes) tool provides Ramadan-specific educational materials, dosing modification information for patients and doctors, and encourages active self-monitoring of before, during and aft...

Price Hikes Have Patients Turning to Craigslist for Insulin, Asthma Inhalers

Maybe you've gone to Craigslist to find a used car or a secondhand couch, but imagine having to turn to the internet to pay for lifesaving drugs.

It's already happening: A new study found that hundreds of ads were placed on Craigslist for insulin and asthma inhalers during a 12-day period in June 2019.

"This study shines a light on how deeply some patients are struggling to...

Drug Duo Speeds Regeneration of Key Cells Lost in Diabetes

A novel combination of two drugs appeared to spur faster regeneration of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, a preliminary study in mice and human tissue found.

Beta cells are crucial to making insulin, a hormone that's deficient in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

The new drug combo pairs an already approved class of type 2 diabetes medications called GLP-...

Medicaid Expansion Meant More Poor in 'Diabetes Belt' Got Insurance

There was a steep drop in the number of low-income people without health insurance in so-called Diabetes Belt states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare, a new study shows.

The Diabetes Belt is a swath of 644 U.S. counties across 15 southeastern states that have high diabetes rates.

More than 11% of adults in the Diabetes Belt have the condition, compared with 8.5...

Big Advances Made Against Diabetes in 2019

A new artificial pancreas system, drugs that help control blood sugar and protect the heart and the kidneys, a new medication that delays type 1 diabetes, and a new way to track blood sugar throughout the day -- 2019 was a pretty big year in diabetes care.

"This has been a good year for patients who have diabetes. There have been a lot of changes and...

Changing Timing, Frequency of Meals May Help With Diabetes

When you eat and how often you eat can make a big impact on your weight and insulin needs if you have type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

The study found that people who ate three meals a day instead of six smaller meals, and moved the timing of those meals to earlier in the day, needed less insulin, improved their blood sugar and lost more than 10 pounds to boot.

"Shi...

'Diabetes Burnout' Is Real, Here's How to Cope

Living with diabetes -- especially if you need insulin to survive -- is a never-ending job that can be life-threatening if done wrong. That constant daily stress can lead to "diabetes burnout," a new study says.

Diabetics experiencing burnout are mentally and physically exhausted, feeling detached from their condition and apathetic about their need for self-care. Diabetes burnout can...

As Diabetes Costs Soar, Many Turn to Black Market for Help

Skyrocketing prices and insurance limits are driving many people with diabetes to seek medications and supplies from an underground supply chain, a new study found.

"The cost of insulin, which is required in type 1 diabetes and a subset of type 2 diabetes, has increased substantially over the last decade. As the price of insulin rises and insurance premiums and deductibles go up, too...

Heart Attack at 44 Helped Her Realize Diabetes' Dangers

Christina Herrera was 44 years old when she felt the symptoms of a heart attack.

"I was sweating, having heart palpitations and out of breath," the high school teacher said. "My school nurse said, 'I have to call an ambulance for you,' and I said I'd go later. I had to get back to my class. She said, 'You have to go now.'"

It's a good thing Herrera listened to her.

...

Diabetes Tougher on Women's Hearts

Diabetes might be more deadly for women than men, at least when it comes to heart troubles, new research shows.

Heart disease occurs an average of 15 years earlier in people with diabetes, and is their main cause of illness and death. In women, the connection between diabetes and heart disease is particularly strong.

Worldwide, more women die due to diabetes than men, 2.1 mi...

Diabetes Technology Often Priced Out of Reach

While the high price of insulin has gotten a lot of attention lately, it's not the only cost issue facing people with diabetes. New technologies designed to improve blood sugar management often cost too much for people to afford.

Maya Headley, 36, has had type 1 diabetes for 30 years. The New York City resident had been using an insulin pump to deliver the repeated daily insulin do...

Supplements Don't Prevent Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetics

Taking vitamin D and fish oil supplements won't prevent kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds.

Many diabetics use the supplements, hoping they will have a positive effect on their kidneys and heart, the researchers said.

"We wanted this study to clarify whether these supplements have any real kidney benefit in adults with diabetes. Even if it's ...

Next-Gen Artificial Pancreas Boosts Blood Sugar Control

The latest version of the so-called artificial pancreas system helped people with type 1 diabetes gain even better control of their blood sugar levels than current technology does, a new study reports.

The device combines an insulin pump, a continuous glucose monitor and a computer algorithm. The system measures blood sugar levels and delivers insulin automatically when levels rise. ...

You've Lost the Weight -- Now Keep It Off to Keep Diabetes at Bay

The health of people with type 2 diabetes often improves dramatically with a 5% to 10% weight loss -- but to sustain the benefits, you need to keep the weight off, new research claims.

After losing weight with a yearlong intervention, blood sugar and blood pressure levels go down and cholesterol results improve. People who kept at least 75% of that weight off for another t...

Could a Pill Replace Insulin Shots?

Many people with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin at least once a day, but new animal research suggests a pill may one day do the trick.

This experimental pill can withstand the trip through the gastrointestinal tract, scientists report. When it gets to the small intestine, it breaks down into dissolving microneedles that attach to the intestinal wall and release the dr...

Just a Little Weight Loss Can Put Diabetes Into Remission

British researchers have good news for people with type 2 diabetes -- you don't need to lose a ton of weight to make a difference in your health.

In fact, they found that losing just 10% of your body weight during the first five years you have the disease can lead to remission of type 2 diabetes. That weight loss would be 18 pounds for someone who weighs 180 pounds.

It...

Pacemakers, Insulin Pumps Could Be Hacking Targets: FDA

Medical devices that can connect to the internet might be at risk for hacking, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday.

"While advanced devices can offer safer, more convenient and timely health care delivery, a medical device connected to a communications network could have cybersecurity vulnerabilities that could be exploited resulting in patient harm," said Dr. Amy Abe...

Affordable Care Act Insured Millions of Uninsured Diabetics

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), nearly 2 million diabetics, many of them poor, got health insurance, a new study shows.

"Insurance coverage can change the health trajectory of people with diabetes by providing access to diagnosis and treatment," said lead researcher Rebecca Myerson. She is an assistant professor of population health sciences at University of Wisconsin School of M...

Older Diabetics May Be Getting Too Much Insulin

Are elderly people with diabetes being overtreated?

A new study suggests that's so: Older, sicker patients tend to be the ones most likely to still be using insulin to manage their blood sugar, despite guidelines that suggest it's often safer to lower diabetes treatment intensity with age.

The study found that nearly 20% of people with type 2 diabetes older than 75 were...

FDA OKs New Pill for Type 2 Diabetes

A new pill to lower blood sugar for people with type 2 diabetes was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday.

The drug, Rybelsus (semaglutide) is the first pill in a class of drugs called glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) approved for use in the United States. Before Rybelsus, the drug had to be injected.

"Before this approval, patients did not have an oral GL...

Keeping Blood Sugar Steady Helps You Live Longer With Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, keeping your blood sugar levels stable over time may be key to living longer.

New research finds that people who have more swings in their blood sugar levels were more than twice as likely to die early, compared to folks with more stable blood sugar management.

The study authors used a test called hemoglobin A1C to measure blood sugar. This com...