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Health News Results - 36

Unplugging From Social Media on Vacation? It's Tough at First

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking a vacation from social media and digital technology while you travel can cause withdrawal symptoms, but a small study suggests you'll come to enjoy the offline experience.

The British study included 24 people. During their travels to 17 countries and regions, most unplugged from technologies such as mobile phones, laptops, tablets, s...

Meet 'Huggable,' the Robot Bear Who's Helping Hospitalized Kids

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of s...

Teen Sexting Can Be Warning Sign of Other Risky Behaviors

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who find a sex-based text on their teenager's phone should be on the lookout for other problems in their child's life, a new evidence review suggests.

Teens who share sexually explicit images are much more likely to be involved in other troubling activities, including unsafe sex, alcohol and drugs.

"The kids who are sexting are e...

AHA News: With Summer Vacation Here, How Much Screen Time Is Too Much?

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Dazzling graphics, engaging applications and a dizzying array of beeps, pings and rings make smartphones and other portable gadgets hard to resist. With summer vacation starting for millions of American children, many parents are asking: How much screen time is too much?

In newly released guidelines, the World Health Organizat...

Does Taking Screens Away Help Sleep-Deprived Teens?

MONDAY, May 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting teens' evening screen time can improve their sleep in just one week, a new study finds.

Research shows that exposure to too much light in the evening -- particularly blue light from smartphones, tablets and computers -- can affect the brain's clock and production of the sleep hormone melatonin, resulting in reduced sleep time and qualit...

Nearly Half of Juul Twitter Followers Are Teens, Young Adults: Study

MONDAY, May 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Juul became the dominant brand of e-cigarettes in the United States by targeting teens with its clever use of social media, a new study suggests.

Nearly 70% of U.S. e-cigarette sales are Juul products, and most vapers are teens and young adults. The study determined that nearly half of Juul's Twitter followers are under age 18, with the maj...

Suspect Your Child Has an Ear Infection? There May Soon Be an App for That

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Can a smartphone app spot an ear infection?

It did so with high accuracy in new research.

Ear infections occur when fluid builds up behind the eardrum and gets contaminated. Though an ear infection can hurt and make it hard to hear, sometimes there are no symptoms and diagnosis can be difficult.

This app uses a smartphon...

Is AI a New Weapon in Breast Cancer Detection?

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence is the hot new trend in medicine, and now new research suggests it could help doctors better predict a woman's breast cancer risk.

The study is the latest to explore the potential role of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine.

Typically, it works like this: Researchers develop an algorithm using "deep learni...

Americans Sitting More Than Ever, and Tech Is to Blame

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- America's couch potatoes are becoming ever more deeply rooted, and computers are the reason why.

The amount of time people spend sitting around has increased in recent years, driven largely by more leisure time spent with a computer, federal survey data shows.

Total daily sitting time increased about an hour a day for teenagers an...

More TV, Tablets, More Attention Issues at Age 5

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

What Matters Most to Online Daters?

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to online love, it may really be about location, location, location.

In a new study, researchers used a state-of-the-art algorithm to analyze 15 million two-way interactions on a major online dating site. They discovered that geography was the key factor when two users exchange messages.

"We were looking not just at ...

Want to Stay Trim? Don't Eat in the Evening, Study Finds

SATURDAY, March 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Maybe you rush around with work and activities during the day, then settle in for a large, relaxing meal in the evening. But new research says the later in the day you eat, the more weight you're likely to pack on.

That's the takeaway from a week-long study involving 31 overweight and obese patients, mostly women...

Eye-Soothing Tips for Computer Users

WEDNESDAY, March 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screens: They're at work, at home and even in the palm of your hand. But stare too long at them and your eyes -- and mind -- could pay a price, experts warn.

For example, too much screen time can lead to problems such as eye strain, dry eye, headaches and insomnia, the American Academy of Ophthalmology warns.

"Eyestrain can be fr...

AI Takes Aim at Lung Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The term artificial intelligence (AI) might bring to mind robots or self-driving cars. But one group of researchers is using a type of AI to improve lung cancer screening.

Screening is important for early diagnosis and improved survival odds, but the current lung cancer screening method has a 96 percent false positive rate.

But i...

Does Social Media Push Teens to Depression? New Study Says No

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook probably isn't driving teenagers to depression, a new study contends.

In fact, Canadian researchers found the relationship worked in the opposite direction -- teenage girls who were already depressed tended to spend more time on social media, to try to feel better.

These findings run count...

'Mind-Reading' AI Turns Thoughts Into Spoken Words

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a breakthrough straight out of the world of science fiction, a team of researchers has used artificial intelligence (AI) to turn brain signals into computer-generated speech.

The feat was accomplished with the assistance of five epilepsy patients. All had been outfitted with various types of brain electrodes as part of their seizure treatm...

Can Artificial Intelligence Read X-Rays?

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An artificial intelligence (AI) system can analyze chest X-rays and spot patients who should receive immediate care, researchers report.

The system could also reduce backlogs in hospitals someday. Chest X-rays account for 40 percent of all diagnostic imaging worldwide, and there can be large backlogs, according to the researchers.

Virtual Doctor Visits Get High Marks in New Survey

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of your care won't suffer if you choose video visits with your doctor, a new study suggests.

It included 254 patients and 61 health care providers who participated in virtual video visits offered by Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The appointments are conducted online, using a computer or tablet and a secure application.<...

Millennials' Odds for Depression Rise With Social Media Use

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Millennials struggling with depression aren't being helped by their use of Facebook, Instagram or Snapchat, a new study reports.

College students who meet the criteria for major depressive disorder tend to use social media more often and are more heavily addicted to social media, researchers found.

They're also more likely to use s...

AI Beats Humans at Detecting Cervical Precancers

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many women in developing countries lack access to advanced screening for cervical cancer. But researchers say a new "AI" technique might help.

The technique relies on photos and computer artificial intelligence to identify changes that may lead to cervical cancer.

Catching these changes early, when they're still easily treatable, c...

Smartphones, Summer Birth Could Raise Kids' Odds for Nearsightedness

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with summer birthdays, especially those who spend long hours playing on smartphones and tablets, might be at greater risk for vision problems, a new study suggests.

Nearsightedness, also called myopia, is on the rise worldwide. It's what eye doctors call a refractive error, meaning the eyes can't focus light properly. The result: Close ob...

Online History Gives Clues to Heart Ills

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Online searches about heart disease peak in the winter, a new study says. That's when deaths from heart disease top out, too.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, and more than 600,000 people die from heart disease in the United States every year.

Researchers wondered if online searches for heart information vari...

Read Any Good Books Lately? No, Teens Say, We're Too Busy Texting and Online

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One of every three American teens has not read a book just for the fun of it in a year, a new study finds.

That's because they're busy texting, checking social media and playing video games four to six hours a day.

The insight into their media habits comes from an analysis of data from more than 1 million teens who were surveyed bet...

AI Better Than Docs at Catching Skin Cancers

THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A computer can beat even highly experienced dermatologists in spotting deadly melanomas, researchers report.

The study is the latest to test the idea that "artificial intelligence" can improve medical diagnoses.

Typically, it works like this: Researchers develop an algorithm using "deep learning" -- where the computer system essenti...

Video Games May Be OK for Toddlers -- If Mom or Dad Join In

TUESDAY, April 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games -- as long as you're playing with them.

That's the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids' development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage ...

15 Percent of Teens Say They've Sexted

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- About 15 percent of teenagers say they've shared a sexually explicit image or video of themselves over the internet or via phone messaging, researchers say.

And nearly twice as many -- about 27 percent -- said they've received a "sext," either from the original sender or from someone passing it along, according to a review of 39 prior studies...

Could Hackers Target Heart Devices?

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your wireless heart implant suddenly goes on the fritz, either conking out completely or causing your heart to beat rapidly or irregularly.

Could you be the victim of a hacking attack aimed at endangering your life by messing with your heart device?

It happened on the "Homeland" TV series, when Islamic terrorists hacked the heart pa...

Protecting Your Electronic Health Records

MONDAY, Feb. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An electronic health record, or EHR, is the digital version of the paper records documenting your health care. These online records are an advance in health management in many ways.

These records mean fewer and shorter forms to fill out at appointments. Your information gets to all of your providers so they can coordinate your care and prevent...

Amber-Tinted Glasses Might Get You More Sleep

TUESDAY, Dec. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For the tech-obsessed who use their smartphones, laptops and tablets right before bedtime, a small new study suggests that inexpensive amber-tinted glasses might guarantee sound slumber.

The glasses block the blue-wavelength light emitted from many hi-tech devices. That light suppresses the brain's production of melatonin, a hormone that re...

Will 'AI' Be Part of Your Health-Care Team?

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence is assuming a greater role in many walks of life, with research suggesting it may even help doctors diagnose disease.

One new study suggests artificial intelligence (AI) might someday detect breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes.

Researchers found that several computer algorithms outperformed a gro...

Could New 'Brain Training' Program Help Prevent Dementia?

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In what is being billed as a first, researchers report that healthy seniors who tried a new brain-training program were less likely to develop dementia down the road.

"Everyone with a brain is at risk of dementia," noted study author Jerri Edwards. But "this is the first treatment ever shown in a clinical trial to make a difference."

A Dangerous New Twist on Cyberbullying

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages -- to themselves.

The worry is that this digital self-harm -- like traditional self-harm -- may be a harbinger for suicide down the road, the study authors said.<...

Doctor, Please Put Down That Computer

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients aren't thrilled about their doctor using a computer during office visits, University of Texas researchers report.

As electronic medical records become more common, it's not unusual for doctors to enter data into a computer as they talk with their patients. But after viewing videos of patients and doctors, researchers saw that ...

Smartphones, Tablets Sabotaging Teens' Sleep

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Teens sleep less than they used to, sacrificing shuteye to spend more time on their phones and tablets.

Experts say teens need at least nine hours of sleep a night to be engaged and productive during the day. Anything less can cause daytime sleepiness and interfere with school or daily activities.

Faced with an array of tempting dist...

Could 'AI' Become a Partner in Breast Cancer Care?

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Machines armed with artificial intelligence may one day help doctors better identify high-risk breast lesions that might turn into cancer, new research suggests.

High-risk breast lesions are abnormal cells found in a breast biopsy. These lesions pose a challenge to doctors and patients. The cells in such lesions aren't normal, but they're not...

Parents Worried About Cyberbullies as School Starts Up

FRIDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With school bells ringing once again, 1 in 3 U.S. parents admits to worrying about bullying and cyberbullying.

A new poll involving more than 1,500 parents of children and teens found one-third very concerned about online bullying and how it could affect their child's mental health.

Experts have warned about the link between cyberbu...