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Health News Results - 49

Many U.S. Parents Can't Find a Psychiatrist to Help Their Child

MONDAY, Nov. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a growing need for mental health care for children and teens -- including a rise in youth suicide -- many areas of the United States lack any child psychiatrists, new research reports.

The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist.

"There are about 17 million children ...

U.S. Autism Rates Rising Fastest for Hispanics, Blacks

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Autism rates among U.S. children are rising fastest among blacks and Hispanics, researchers say.

"We found that rates among blacks and Hispanics are not only catching up to those of whites -- which have historically been higher -- but surpassing them," said study author Cynthia Nevison, a research scientist at the University of Colorado Bou...

Explaining, Easing the Horror of Mass Shootings for Your Kids

MONDAY, Aug. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past weekend, 21 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, while a separate incident in Dayton, Ohio, claimed the lives of nine people. Dozens more were injured.

For adults, horrific and senseless events like these have become a tragic, recurrent aspect of American life over the past few decades.

B...

What Happens to the Children When Parents Fight?

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Don't fight in front of the kids."

Sounds like familiar advice that's been passed down from generation to generation. But as it turns out, it's not always the fighting, but rather the way you fight that can have a negative -- or a positive -- effect on your children.

Researchers E. Mark Cummings and Patrick Davies have studied th...

Parent Who Listens Can Help Kids Thrive Despite Trauma

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heartfelt talks between parent and child are essential to help kids overcome tough times and do their best at school, a new study says.

Traumatic events in a kid's life can cause the child to neglect school work and increase the odds that they'll wind up repeating a grade, researchers found.

But having even one parent lend a kind and...

Meet 'Huggable,' the Robot Bear Who's Helping Hospitalized Kids

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- He sings, he plays games -- and Huggable the 'social robot' teddy bear could be good medicine for kids in the hospital.

In a study of 50 children, aged 3 to 10 years, the plush bear boosted spirits, eased anxiety and even lowered perceived pain levels, say Boston Children's Hospital researchers.

"It's exciting knowing what types of s...

Will Video Games Make Your Kid Obese? Maybe Not

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- To the millions of parents who worry about the extra pounds their child might pile on while playing Xbox all day, rest easy.

A new study suggests that video game-loving kids aren't any heavier than those who aren't into the gaming scene.

Childhood obesity affects an estimated 13.7 million children and adolescents in the United Stat...

Kindergarten Behavior Linked to Life Earnings in Study

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Believe it or not, how your kid acts in kindergarten might impact his earning potential years later, a new study suggests.

Canadian researchers found that boys and girls who were identified by their kindergarten teachers as inattentive earned nearly $1,300 less a year than their more focused peers.

Additionally, boys identified ...

Can Playing a Sport Foster Better-Adjusted Kids?

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a young child involved in organized sports may have a mental health payoff down the line, according to a new study.

Kids who had participated in athletic programs between ages 6 and 10 had less emotional distress, anxiety and shyness by age 12. They were also less likely to suffer from social withdrawal, researchers found.

"Th...

What to Do When Your Child Throws a Fit

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a wel...

More Active Lupus Linked to Childhood Events

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds.

Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges.

The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of those, about 63% reported at ...

Autism Diagnoses Reliable at 14 Months, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 8...

More TV, Tablets, More Attention Issues at Age 5

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

Suicidal Behavior Nearly Doubles Among U.S. Kids

MONDAY, April 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide attempts and talk about suicide are rising alarmingly among America's kids, with emergency departments seeing a near doubling of cases over less than a decade, a new study reveals.

Among children aged 5 to 18, suicidal thoughts and attempts led to more than 1.1 million ER visits in 2015 -- up from about 580,000 in 2007, according to an...

Kids Can Get 'Stuck' on Traumatic Event, Leading to PTSD

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and teens is higher if they think their response to a traumatic event is abnormal, a new study indicates.

Most kids fully recover after a traumatic event, such as a car accident. But some develop PTSD that may endure for months, years or even into adulthood, according to resea...

Abuse in Childhood Tied to Brain Changes and Later Depression

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in ea...

Nix That TV in Your 4-Year-Old's Bedroom

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking about a TV for your young child? Based on new evidence, you might want to reconsider that.

Preschoolers who had a TV in their bedroom were at increased risk for poor eating habits, overweight/obesity and social/emotional struggles in their teens, Canadian researchers say.

"The early years are a critical period in a child's...

Obesity May Harm Kids' Academics, Coping Skills

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obese kids may have extra difficulty with schoolwork and coping under stress, a preliminary study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 23,000 parents, researchers found that kids who were obese were less likely to show certain indicators of "flourishing," versus their normal-weight peers.

That meant less engagement in schoolwork and learni...

More Evidence Video Games May Trigger Aggression in Kids

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Can violent video games push some kids to act violently in real life? A new research review suggests the answer is "yes."

The analysis combined the results of 24 past studies, involving more than 17,000 children and teenagers. Overall, researchers found, kids who played video games featuring fighting, attacks and killing were somewhat more like...

Brief Exercise Breaks During Class Help Bodies, Brains

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two-minute exercise breaks in the classroom may help school children meet physical activity goals without disrupting learning, new research suggests.

University of Michigan researchers say short bursts of in-classroom activity can trim childhood obesity rates while helping elementary schools provide 30 minutes of daily exercise for student...

Boys Lag Behind Girls in Reading by 4th Grade

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- By fourth grade, girls in the United States read and write better than boys, a new study reveals.

Australian researchers found this gender achievement gap appears in standardized tests and worsens over time.

"The common thinking is that boys and girls in grade school start with the same cognitive ability, but this research sugge...

Talking to Baby Might Boost Middle School Success

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Time spent reading to toddlers or having "conversations" with them helps boost their intelligence and thinking skills, even a decade later, new research shows.

The study found that the more "conversational turns" that occurred in a toddler's day, the better children performed on tests that measure IQ, language skills and thinking skills in m...

Top of Teachers' To-Do List: Focus on the Positives

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Students gain when teachers focus on positive behavior.

So say British researchers who examined the impact of a program designed to train teachers to build strong social relationships with their students. They're encouraged to ignore minor bad behavior, and acknowledge good behavior.

The program resulted in improved student behavi...

Can Smartphones Trigger ADHD Symptoms in Teens?

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who constantly use their smartphones may have a heightened risk of developing symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a new study suggests.

The findings offer a look at a question many parents may have: Can those ubiquitous digital devices -- and their constant pull on kids' attention -- cause mental or behavioral issu...

Animal Cruelty May Indicate Child Abuse

TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children who abuse animals may have been abused themselves, a new study suggests.

Kids aged 10 and up who intentionally hurt animals are two to three times more likely to have been abused than kids who treat animals with respect, said the British researchers who conducted the review.

"Asking about a history of animal abuse in a safe...

Many Young Kids Not Screened for Developmental Delays

FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are supposed to screen young children to see if they're learning basic skills. But only 17 percent of kids get this critical testing in some places in the United States, a new study finds.

Overall, fewer than one-third of U.S. children under 3 years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems, said researchers at John ...

How 'Helicopter' Parenting Impedes a Child's Development

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Overcontrolling moms and dads -- so-called "helicopter" parents -- can stunt their children's emotional development, new research warns.

Directing every move a toddler makes may undermine a child's ability to manage their emotions and behavior on their own, explained Nicole Perry, lead author of a new study.

"We found that overcontro...

Pediatricians Say No to Spanking

MONDAY, June 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. pediatricians say spanking is a bad way to discipline children.

"In the past couple of decades, a tremendous amount of research has come out that shows hitting children is counterproductive and leads to more harm than good," said Catherine Taylor, author of a new survey on the subject.

"I hope that pediatricians will recogn...

When Kids Expect a Needle to Hurt, It Does

WEDNESDAY, May 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to kids and medical procedures like needles, expectation is everything.

If they think the shot will hurt, it probably will, a new study finds. On the flip side, if they're coaxed not to expect a lot of pain, they may feel it less.

"We know that expectation affects pain experience in adults; we don't know whether this ...

Can Excess Weight in Toddlers Cause Brain Drain?

WEDNESDAY, May 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Extra pounds in early childhood may do more than put a child's physical health at risk -- they might result in a slightly lower IQ, new research suggests.

The study found that "non-lean" children tended to score lower on an intelligence quotient (IQ) test years later, particularly in the areas of reasoning and working memory.

But...

Race May Play Role in Kids' Suicide Risk

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's generally assumed that suicide is more common among white kids in the United States than their black peers. But that's not the case among 5- to 12-year-olds, new research shows.

Black children in that young age group are about twice as likely to take their own lives as whites, the researchers found.

For older kids, the picture r...

Most U.S. Adults Support More Mental Health Services for Kids

TUESDAY, May 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A vast majority of U.S. adults believe children should receive more mental health support, new research reveals.

Nearly nine out of 10 adults favor more mental health treatment and prevention programs for children and teens in their communities, according to a poll commissioned by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

"The...

Video Games May Be OK for Toddlers -- If Mom or Dad Join In

TUESDAY, April 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games -- as long as you're playing with them.

That's the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids' development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage ...

Sibling Bullying Could Have Mental Health Effects

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who, as young kids, either bullied their siblings or were bullied themselves by siblings face an increased risk for psychotic disorders, a new British study suggests.

By age 18, those who'd been either the victim or the bully several times a week or month were two to three times more likely to have a psychotic disorder, such as schizoph...

Preemies Get a Slow Start on Friendships

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if preemies didn't face enough struggles, a new study finds they have more difficulty making friends, though things improve once they start school.

"Having friends, playing with them and being accepted is important for social support and personal well-being," said study leader Dieter Wolke. He's a psychology professor at the University of W...

If You Suspect a Child Is Being Abused or Neglected, Report It

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You should alert authorities if you suspect a child is being hurt or is in danger, a child abuse expert says.

The issue is in the spotlight with the recent arrest of David and Louise Turpin, the California couple accused of abusing their 13 children for years.

Members of the public can report concerns anonymously, which is what happen...

Positive Attitude Adds Up to Better Math Grades

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's said that a positive attitude can help kids do better in math. Now, a new study shows how that connection adds up in the brain.

"Attitude is really important," said lead author Lang Chen, a postdoctoral scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University. "Based on our data, the unique contribution of positive attitude to...

For Kids, Chronic Illness May Trigger Mental Health Issues

MONDAY, Jan. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When children learn they have a long-term illness, such as diabetes or epilepsy, they're likely to suffer emotionally, too, a small study finds.

These mental health issues surface soon after the diagnosis, the Canadian researchers said.

Surveying 50 kids with a chronic illness and their parents, the study authors found anxiety disor...

Apple Investors Press for Parental Controls on iPhones

MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents aren't the only ones worried about their kids' smartphone habits. Some big Apple investors want the iPhone developer to make it easier for Mom and Dad to manage their children's phone time.

Apple also needs to explore potential mental health effects of smartphone overuse, says a letter sent to the technology giant this weekend by Jana ...

How to Avoid 'Toy Overload' This Holiday Season

FRIDAY, Dec. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Santa's sleigh may be brimming with toys, but some experts say an excess of dolls, trucks and other playthings can overwhelm a child.

Instead of giving more toys this holiday season, think about giving children memory-creating experiences such as lessons or family outings, the experts suggest.

"Toy overload is real, and something we ...

Family Meals Serve Up Better Behaved Kids

THURSDAY, Dec. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose families regularly eat meals together tend to have better social skills and fitness levels, researchers report.

Family meals yield multiple physical and mental health benefits, according to the long-term Canadian study.

"The presence of parents during mealtimes likely provides young children with firsthand social int...

Mom's Childhood Trauma May Affect Daughter, Too

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Mental illness caused by traumatic experiences in early childhood may be passed from mothers to their daughters, new research suggests.

The study involved adults whose parents had been evacuated from Finland during World War II, when they were children.

Many of the approximately 49,000 children evacuated from Finland from 1941 to ...

Self-Harm Cases Surging Among U.S. Girls

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's a new sign of mental distress among American girls: Nearly 20 percent more young teen and preteen females have sought emergency room treatment for poisoning, cutting or harming themselves yearly since 2009, research shows.

Girls ages 10 to 14 had an 18.8 percent increase per year in treatment for self-inflected injuries -- the sharpes...

Can Girls Help Boost Boys' Reading Scores?

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Boys tend to pay more attention in school when there are girls around, and new research suggests it's not just about how the girls look.

The study found that young men got better reading marks in school when they were outnumbered by young women in the classroom.

Researchers reviewed the reading test scores of more than 200,000 15-yea...

Childhood Spanking Could Heighten Adult Mental Health Woes

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were spanked as kids may face heightened risk of certain mental health problems, a new study suggests.

The study found that those who were spanked were more likely to have abused drugs or attempted suicide.

And that was with other factors -- including more severe physical or emotional abuse -- taken into account.

<...

A Dangerous New Twist on Cyberbullying

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages -- to themselves.

The worry is that this digital self-harm -- like traditional self-harm -- may be a harbinger for suicide down the road, the study authors said.<...

Helping Children Cope When a Mass Tragedy Strikes

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place.

In the wake of such bloodshed, a New Jersey family physician offers guidance to parents trying to help children manage their fears.

'Good Ole Days' Were Better for Kids' Health, Adults Say

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The kids aren't alright, many American adults believe.

More than two-thirds of adults think children today are less healthy than previous generations of youngsters, and more than 75 percent believe kids' mental health is also worse, a new survey finds.

"Our findings clash with the American dream of expecting that the quality of life w...

What Drives Teen School Shooters

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A teenage school shooter may be attempting to prove his masculinity.

So says an Oregon researcher who analyzed the traits shared by 31 boys involved in 29 mass shootings at U.S. schools.

The attacks occurred between 1995 and 2015, and the killers ranged in age from 11 to 18 years old. The total number of dead: 58.

Boys who ...