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Health News Results - 145

Time to Angioplasty Is Crucial for Better Heart Attack Outcomes

When a heart attack begins, the time it takes until the blockage in a coronary artery is cleared is critical in preventing further damage to the heart, a new study warns.

The amount of damage is directly related to how long it takes from the start of a heart attack to when patients receive an artery-clearing procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention, or angioplasty. The biggest ...

Pandemic Is Tied to Big Rise in U.S. Heart Deaths

In a finding that highlights another health consequence of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers report that the risk of dying from heart disease increased during the coronavirus lockdowns last spring, likely because people were too scared to go to the hospital.

But the dangers of not seeking treatment for a medical emergency far outweigh that of catching COVID-19, especially now that pre...

Certain Antibiotics Linked With Upped Risk for Deadly Aortic Aneurysms

A widely used class of antibiotics has been linked to an increased risk of a potentially fatal blood vessel condition -- even in younger, healthy people.

In a study of millions of antibiotic prescriptions made in the United States, researchers found that one class was associated with a small increase in the risk of aortic aneurysm.

The drugs -- called fluoroquinolones -- have been a...

Blood Pressure Often Differs Widely Between Two Arms: Study

Blood pressure readings between the two arms can be different, and that disparity can sometimes be a warning sign of heart trouble down the road.

That's the finding of an analysis of 24 past studies: When people have at least a 5-point difference in blood pressure between the two arms, their risk of heart attack, stroke or premature death inches up. And the greater the difference, the mor...

Heart Disease Is World's No. 1 Killer

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide -- accounting for one-third of deaths in 2019 -- and the death toll continues to rise, a new paper says.

China had the highest number of heart disease deaths last year, followed by India, Russia, the United States and Indonesia. Heart disease death rates were lowest in France, Peru and Japan, where rates were six times lower than in 19...

Gay, Lesbian Adults Often Miss Out on Cholesterol Meds

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adults are less likely to take cholesterol-lowering statins to prevent heart disease than heterosexual adults, even though they have a higher heart disease risk, according to a new study.

Researchers conducted an online survey of more than 1,500 Facebook users, aged 40 and older, and found that nearly one-third were taking statins.

Of the 12% of resp...

AHA News: People With Depression Fare Worse in Heart Health Study

Heart disease and depression are interwoven, and a new study is helping unravel that connection by linking depression with poorer scores on seven important measures of heart health.

The research included more than 4,000 people taking part in a national survey who had been screened for depression using a basic questionnaire. Participants were evaluated for weight, smoking, diet, physical a...

Prescription-Strength Fish Oil Won't Help Your Heart -- Or Will It?

Does high-strength fish oil help the heart or doesn't it?

Prior research into a prescription medicine derived from fish called Vascepa, announced earlier this year, suggested it might be of real value for heart patients.

But the results from a trial of another such drug called Epanova, released Sunday, are disappointing: Researchers found no benefit from taking the medicine for a w...

Transgender People Often Have Heart Risks: Study

Many transgender people who take hormone therapy have unaddressed risks for heart disease and stroke, a new study finds.

These patients often have undiagnosed high blood pressure and high cholesterol, even in young adulthood, researchers found.

"Previous research has shown that transgender individuals are less likely to have access to health care or to utilize health care for a vari...

Green Spaces Do a Heart Good

More green space can reduce air pollution, improve air quality and maybe lower the risk for heart disease deaths, a new study suggests.

"We found that both increased greenness and increased air quality were associated with fewer deaths from heart disease," said researcher Dr. William Aitken, a cardiology fellow with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Greenness is a m...

Flu Vaccine Rates Low in Young Adults With Heart Disease

Among young adults with heart disease, less than 25% get a flu shot, a new study finds.

"Individuals with cardiovascular disease are more likely to have flu than among those without any chronic health conditions," said researcher Dr. Tarang Parekh, a Ph.D. candidate and assistant researcher at George Mason University College of Health and Human Services in Fairfax, Va.

Getting the ...

Five Ways to Reduce Your Stroke Risk

Strokes can happen any time, anywhere and at any age, which is why it's important to know how to reduce your risk, says the American Stroke Association.

First, check your blood pressure regularly.

"Checking your blood pressure regularly and getting it to a healthy range is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your risk of stroke," Dr. Mitchell Elkind, president of t...

Poor Brain Blood Flow Might Spur 'Tangles' of Alzheimer's

Offering fresh insight into the deep-seated roots of dementia, new research finds that diminished blood flow to the brain is tied to buildup a protein long associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Called "tau," high levels of the protein are "one of the hallmark pathologies that define Alzheimer's disease in the brain," explained study author Judy Pa. She is an associate professor of neur...

Having Heart Disease Can Make Other Surgeries More Risky

Heart patients may face a greater chance of cardiovascular complications after having major surgery that doesn't involve the heart, new research suggests.

Twenty percent of these patients experienced heart troubles within a year of such surgery, the researchers found.

"Our study reveals a greater likelihood of having heart problems or dying after noncardiac surgery than has ...

Computer 'Nudge' Spurs Doctors to Prescribe Statins to Heart Patients

Prescriptions of cholesterol-lowering statins for heart disease patients rose significantly when doctors were prompted to choose whether or not to order them, according to a new study.

It included 82 cardiologists and more than 11,000 patients. Doctors randomly received one of two "nudges," or notifications, in their patients' electronic health records.

One was a "passive ch...

Heart Patients Need to Be Wary of Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic and flu season pose a double risk for heart disease patients, so they need to be extra vigilant about their health, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) says.

"Heart disease patients bear a greater burden during the pandemic since they are having to navigate managing their heart health while also protecting themselves from COVID-19, as they are at increase...

Tough Menopause May Signal Future Heart Woes

As if the misery of hot flashes, night sweats and sleep troubles weren't enough, now new research suggests that women who routinely experience moderate to severe menopausal symptoms have a higher risk of stroke and heart disease.

"This analysis assessed various menopausal symptoms and their association with health outcomes. Women with two or more moderate to severe menopausal symptom...

Women Get Worse Care for Heart Attack

Young women who suffer a particularly deadly condition after a heart attack are 11% more likely to die from it than men, a new study finds.

Not only that, women aged 18 to 55 are less likely to receive the tests and aggressive treatment that men routinely receive, and are more likely to die in the hospital, the researchers added.

"It's very difficult to understand exac...

Some Psoriasis Meds May Also Help Prevent Heart Disease

Biologic therapy for the skin condition psoriasis may reduce patients' risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

Chronic inflammation in people with psoriasis is associated with the development of plaque in heart arteries, which increases the risk of coronary artery disease. In biologic therapy, patients receive protein-based infusions to reduce inflammation.

"This is th...

Gynecological Exam, Heart Screening Should Go Hand-in-Hand

What if you were given a heart screening when you see your gynecologist?

New research suggests that such a strategy might be smart medicine.

Scientists found that 86% of women seen at an outpatient gynecology clinic had a cardiovascular risk factor and 40% had at least one cardiovascular symptom, but there was low awareness of cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms...

What Athletes Should Know About COVID-19, Heart Damage and Working Out

With evidence mounting that COVID-19 can damage the heart, experts urge people to take precautions when doing vigorous exercise.

Up to 30% of patients hospitalized with coronavirus infection have signs of cardiac injury, according to Dr. Sunal Makadia, health director of sports cardiology at LifeBridge Health in Baltimore.

The prevalence of heart damage in milder cases o...

Study Casts Doubt on Value of Cholesterol Drugs

Hundreds of millions of people worldwide take cholesterol-lowering drugs, like statins, but now a new review suggests that many folks don't benefit from these medications.

The researchers said the review of 35 randomized controlled trials failed to show a consistent benefit in lowering the risk of heart attack or stroke, or for preventing deaths.

"Normally, when you have a...

Chronic Conditions Tied to Severe COVID-19 More Common in Southeast, Rural Areas

Obesity. Diabetes. Heart disease. COPD. Kidney disease. These chronic medical conditions all raise the risk of suffering a severe case of COVID-19, but a new government report shows some parts of the United States are far more vulnerable to these risks than others.

In a review of more than 3,000 U.S. counties, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found ...

Sweet News: Chocolate May Help Your Heart

If the stress of the current pandemic has you reaching for chocolate, a new review may give you just the excuse you need.

The study found that people who ate one or more servings of chocolate a week were up to 10% less likely to have heart disease than people who ate less or no chocolate weekly.

Unfortunately, these findings don't mean you can eat chocolate with abando...

Obesity in Childhood Quickly Harms Heart Health

In a finding that suggests the seeds for heart disease are sown early in life, researchers report they found evidence of stiff, thickened arteries in children who had been obese as toddlers.

"Public health efforts are needed in the very early years to prevent problems with obesity and being overweight, to avoid the risk of adolescent and adult cardiovascular disease," said study auth...

75 or Older? Statins Can Still Benefit Your Heart

Older adults with healthy hearts probably would benefit from taking a cholesterol-lowering statin, a new study contends.

People 75 and older who were free of heart disease and prescribed a statin wound up with a 25% lower risk of death from any cause and a 20% lower risk of heart-related death, researchers reported July 7 in the Journal of the American Medical Association...

Black Patients Fare Worse After Angioplasty

Even after undergoing the artery-clearing procedure angioplasty, Black patients with heart disease are more likely than whites to suffer a heart attack or die within the next several years.

That's the conclusion of a new analysis of 10 clinical trials: On balance, both Black and Hispanic patients fared worse after angioplasty, versus white patients. And that was particularly true for ...

Exercise Might Make Breast Milk's Goodness Even Better

Exercise is part of a healthy lifestyle, but a new study suggests it also increases the amount of a beneficial compound called 3SL in the breast milk of both humans and mice.

Based on that, researchers think that its benefits to babies could last for decades, potentially making them less likely to experience such chronic illnesses as obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease as they ...

Excess Sugar Is No Sweet Deal for Your Heart

Too much added sugar can pile on dangerous fat around your heart and in your abdomen, a new study finds.

"When we consume too much sugar, the excess is converted to fat and stored," said researcher So Yun Yi, a Ph.D. student at the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health.

"This fat tissue located around the heart and in the abdomen releases chemicals into the bod...

Preterm Birth Ups Mom's Long-Term Heart Disease Risk: Study

Over a lifetime, women who've had a preterm delivery have a higher risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

The findings point to the fact that doctors should include a woman's reproductive history in assessments of heart disease risk, according to the researchers.

"Preterm delivery should now be recognized as an independent risk factor for IHD [ischemic heart disease] ...

Researchers Latch Onto the Leech's Genome

A mainstay of 18th-century medicine -- the lowly leech -- has made something of a comeback in the 21st century. That's largely due to powerful blood thinners the parasitic worm secretes naturally.

Now, genetic research could give a major boost to the medical use of leeches, scientists say.

An international team sequenced the genome of a European leech called Hirudo medici...

Cancer Patients Less Likely to Be Prescribed Heart Meds: Study

Heart disease is on the rise among cancer patients and survivors, but they're less likely than people without cancer to be prescribed medicines to protect their heart, a new study finds.

Heart disease has become a leading cause of long-term preventable death in cancer survivors, according to the study published June 16 as a research letter in the journal JACC: CardioOncology.<...

Are Hardened Arteries a Risk Factor for Poor Slumber?

If you can't sleep well at night, the problem may be rooted in hardened arteries, a new study suggests.

"We've discovered that fragmented sleep is associated with a unique pathway -- chronic circulating inflammation throughout the bloodstream -- which, in turn, is linked to higher amounts of plaques in coronary arteries," said researcher Matthew Walker. He's a professor of psychology...

Stroke Treatment Gap Narrows Between Men and Women

Women who have a stroke are far more likely to be treated with clot-busting drugs than they used to be, new research shows.

In the early 2000s, women suffering a stroke were 30% less likely than men to get clot-busting treatment, also known as thrombolysis. Recently, the gap has narrowed to 13%.

The researchers reached that conclusion by pooling data from 24 studies...

Tai Chi Could Be Good Medicine for Heart Patients

Tai chi might be just what doctors should order for their heart patients, new research suggests.

Many of these folks experience anxiety, stress and depression. For example, depression affects about 20% of people with heart disease or heart failure, 27% of those with high blood pressure, and 35% of stroke survivors.

Tai chi is a mind-body exercise that combines se...

Exercise Habits Key to Gauging Seniors' Longevity

Knowing how much older adults exercise can predict their odds of developing heart disease or dying early, a new study suggests.

Asking patients during atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) screening about their levels of exercise can help start treatment sooner, researchers say.

"With people now living longer, there is a growing need to determine how we can best detect latent...

More Evidence Sugary Drinks Harm Women's Hearts

Women who drink a lot of sodas, sweetened juices and other sugary drinks are at greater risk of developing heart disease, a new study finds.

Those who drink one or more a day have nearly a 20% higher risk than women who never do. And it's not just soda that's problematic: Fruit drinks with added sugars are also a culprit, researchers say.

Though the study does not pro...

High Blood Pressure May Affect More Pregnant Women Than Thought: Study

Twice as many women who have high blood pressure during pregnancy may be at an increased risk for heart and kidney disease than once thought, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers collected data on more than 9,800 pregnancies among more than 7,500 women in Olmsted County, Minn., who gave birth between 1976 and 1982.

During that time, 659 women had 719 high blood...

During Coronavirus Pandemic, Don't Ignore Symptoms of Heart Attack, Stroke

Fewer heart attack and stroke patients are seeking medical care since the coronavirus pandemic began and doctors are wondering why.

It's possible that during the pandemic, patients are ignoring symptoms that would otherwise worry them, doctors from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles suggest.

While investigators are trying to figure out what's happening, Dr. Patrick Lyden, a profe...

E-Cigarettes as Bad for Arteries as Regular Smokes, Study Finds

Electronic cigarettes are touted by some as safer than smoking tobacco. But a new study finds they damage blood vessels just like traditional cigarettes do.

Among hundreds of healthy young adults, researchers found that vaping and smoking cigarettes cause the same harm to arteries that leads to heart attacks, strokes and heart disease.

"The evidence is growing that e-cigar...

Coffee May Do a Heart Good, as Long as It's Filtered

Stay-at-home orders mean that many people are making their own morning coffee for the first time. Now, a timely new study suggests the healthiest way is with a drip coffee maker.

Researchers found that coffee drinkers typically enjoyed longer lives than nondrinkers, but only if the java was filtered -- suggesting espresso lovers might be out of luck.

The study, of over 500,0...

Rural Women at Higher Risk of Early Death From Heart Disease

Women under age 65 with coronary artery disease are more likely to die if they live in rural areas of the United States, and premature deaths among them have surged, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed nationwide data on premature deaths from coronary artery disease between 1999 and 2017. While premature deaths decreased overall, they remained consistently higher in rural areas --...

AHA News: Clogged Arteries Are Not the Only Sign of Cardiovascular Disease

Doctors rely on a variety of risk assessments to evaluate how likely a person is to develop heart disease. While the scores provide an invaluable tool for health care professionals and the general public alike, they are not infallible.

For example, they sometimes fail to accurately predict risk in a condition where there's a lack of blood flow to tissues but no obstruction in the hea...

Heart Patients Need to Be Wary of Coronavirus

People with high blood pressure and heart disease may be vulnerable to complications from COVID-19, heart experts say.

Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

Based on current knowledge, seniors "with coronary heart disease or high blood pressure may be more susceptible to the coronavirus and more likely to devel...

Major Study Casts Doubt on Routine Use of Stents, Bypass

Folks with clogged arteries do as well with medication and lifestyle changes as they do after undergoing invasive procedures to reopen their blood vessels, a major new clinical trial reports.

Bypass surgery, balloon angioplasty and stenting are no better than drugs, eating right and exercising at reducing the risk of heart attack and death in people with stable ischemic heart disease,...

Severe COVID-19 Might Injure the Heart

The new coronavirus may be a respiratory bug, but it's becoming clear that some severely ill patients sustain heart damage. And it may substantially raise their risk of death, doctors in China are reporting.

They found that among 416 patients hospitalized for severe COVID-19 infections, almost 20% developed damage to the heart muscle. More than half of those patients died.

...

When Arteries Narrow, Chest Pain Can Come Earlier for Women Than Men

Women with coronary artery disease have less narrowing in their blood vessels but more chest pain than men with the condition, a new study finds.

In coronary artery disease, plaque build-up in arteries results in reduced blood flow (ischemia) to the heart.

The study included more than 1,100 women and more than 4,000 men whose results on cardiac stress tests indicated they ha...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Cut Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Weight-loss surgery is associated with a significantly lower risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and death, a new study reveals.

The study included more than 7,400 severely obese people, average age 36, in Denmark who had not suffered a heart attack or stroke. Half of the participants had weight-loss ("bariatric") surgery and half did not (the "control" group).

Over ...

U.S. Deaths From High Blood Pressure Soar, Especially in the South: Study

There's been a sharp increase in high blood pressure-related deaths in the United States, particularly in rural areas, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 10 million U.S. deaths between 2007 and 2017 and found that death rates linked to high blood pressure (hypertension) rose 72% in rural areas and 20% in urban areas.

The increase was highest in ...

Vaping's Popularity Soars as New Data Points to Heart Risks

E-cigarette use is rising, putting more Americans at risk of blood vessel damage and heart disease, according to three new studies.

In the first study, researchers found that nearly 1 in 20 adults use e-cigarettes.

"Our study may have important public health implications and ramifications for educational strategies aimed at targeting various population segments to inform t...