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Could Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?

Toxic chemicals in a wide range of products are associated with an increased risk of celiac disease in children and young adults, researchers say.

People with celiac disease -- an immune disorder -- can't tolerate foods that contain gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

New York University researchers analyzed the blood of 30 children and young adults newly diagn...

Replace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From Toxins

If you have kids and carpets, it might be time to redecorate. Older carpets are a major source of kids' exposure to harmful chemicals known as PFAS, researchers say.

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are associated with serious health risks in kids and adults, including impaired neurodevelopment, immune system dysfunction, hormone disruption and cancer.

The chemical...

As Coronavirus Fears Surge, Keep Cleaning Products Away From Children

The coronavirus pandemic has triggered a wave of accidental poisonings from household cleaners and disinfectants.

With the National Poison Data System recently reporting a more than 20% spike in such emergencies, the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) emphasized the need to store cleaning products safely away from children.

Bleach and alcohol-based hand sanitizers accoun...

Laser Process May Kill Bacteria on Metal Surfaces

Researchers have come up with a new twist on antibacterial technology.

By giving a metal surface a different texture, the team at Purdue University in Indiana said it may be possible to turn that surface into an immediate bacteria killer.

The technique won't kill viruses like the one responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, because they are much smaller than bacteria, the res...

FDA Pulls Heartburn Drug Zantac From Market

All versions of the heartburn drug Zantac (ranitidine) have been pulled from the U.S. market due to possible contamination with a probable cancer-causing chemical, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday.

This is the latest step in an ongoing investigation of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in ranitidine medications, the agency noted.

In some ranitidine products, ...

The Most Effective Ways to Kill Coronavirus in Your Home

A number of home cleaning supplies may be effective against the new coronavirus, experts say.

"Not many scientific studies have asked which are the most effective disinfecting agents to use against [the new coronavirus] because it was discovered so recently," said Siobain Duffy, an associate professor of ecology at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., with expertise in emerging ...

More Evidence Tying Vitamin E Acetate to Vapers' Lung Disease

Researchers have found more evidence from animal studies linking vitamin E acetate in vaping liquids to deadly lung damage in people who use electronic cigarettes.

Vitamin E acetate is sometimes used in vaping liquids with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

Since August, there have been more than 2,800 U.S. cases of EVALI (e-cigarette- or vaping-associated lung injury...

Female Firefighters Face Higher Exposure to Carcinogens

Female firefighters are exposed to chemicals that may be linked with breast and other types of cancer, researchers say.

Compared to women working in offices, female firefighters in San Francisco are exposed to higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). These chemicals are used in firefighting foam and uniforms, grease- and water-resistant coatings and in fabrics, fur...

Common Plastics Chemicals Linked to Autism Traits in Young Boys

Young boys whose mothers were exposed to chemicals known as phthalates while pregnant may face an increased risk for developing behaviors associated with autism, a new study warns.

Phthalates are chemicals found in many household products, including cosmetics and plastics.

The study didn't identify a heightened risk for autism per se among boys, but rather a "small" increas...

Babies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma Risk

A key to your baby's asthma risk may be as close as your laundry room.

Canadian research shows that an infant's exposure to household cleaning products in the first few months of life is tied to heightened odds for asthma by age 3.

Babies may be especially vulnerable because they "typically spend 80% to 90% of their time indoors, and are especially vulnerable to chem...

Some U.S. Workers Are Bringing Toxins Home to Their Kids

People who work with potentially dangerous chemicals or hazardous metals such as lead may unwittingly bring those toxic substances home, a new review says.

In the home, these substances put family members, especially children, at risk of serious illness.

While precautions may be taken in the workplace to protect workers, these take-home exposures may fall into a regulatory bli...

Flame Retardants, Pesticides Remain Threat to U.S. Health: Study

While health problems from childhood exposure to lead and mercury are on the decline, these and other toxic chemicals continue to take a toll, a new study reports.

The progress likely owes to decades of restrictions on use of heavy metals. But researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City said that exposure to other toxic chemicals -- especially flame retardants ...

Sunscreen Chemicals Absorbed Into Body, Study Finds

The chemicals in sunscreens help shield people from the sun's rays, but they are also absorbed into the body at levels that raise some safety questions, a new study confirms.

The study, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a follow-up to a 2019 investigation. Both reached the same conclusion: The active ingredients in popular sunscreens can be absorbed into the blood at ...

Banned for Decades, DDT and Dioxins Are Still Harming U.S. Babies

Decades-banned pesticides apparently continue to interfere with fetal growth during U.S. pregnancies, a new study reports.

DDT was banned in 1972 in the United States, but low levels of it and other organic chemical pollutants can still be found in the blood of pregnant American women, researchers reported online Dec. 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Women carrying even low levels ...

Insecticides Tied to Heart Disease Deaths

People with high levels of a common insecticide in their system are far more vulnerable to heart disease, a new study suggests.

According to Wei Bao, assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues, people who have been exposed to pyrethroid insecticides are three times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those wit...

Eye Injuries From Household Cleaners Drop, But Kids Remain at Risk

Having little ones visit for the holidays? Be sure to stow household cleaners safely out of their reach.

These products are a major source of reports to U.S. poison control centers, and exposures often involve the eyes. Though overall eye exposures have declined in the United States, the number of cases involving young children remains high.

Between 2000 and 2016, U.S. poiso...

Additives to E-Cigarettes May Be Upping Health Dangers

Natural compounds added to marijuana-derived vaping liquid produce toxic chemicals in the vapor that users inhale, a new lab study reports.

The compounds, known as terpenes, are added into pure THC distillations to dilute the product and provide the vapor with aroma and taste, said senior researcher Robert Strongin, a professor of organic chemistry at Portland State University in Ore...

BPA Levels in Humans Are Underestimated: Study

Levels of the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in people's bodies are much higher than once thought, according to scientists who say they've created a more accurate way to measure them.

BPA is used in many plastic products, including food and drink containers, and animal studies have shown that it can interfere with hormones. Exposure to BPA in the womb has been linked to growth...

Think Vaping Is Heathier for Your Heart Than Smoking? Think Again

Vaping isn't necessarily better for your heart health than smoking tobacco, a pair of new studies argue.

They report that use of e-cigarettes negatively affects risk factors for heart disease in ways similar to traditional tobacco cigarettes:

  • Levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides are elevated in people who use e-cigarettes, according to results from the first stud...

Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to findings published online Oct. 18 in J...

Heavy Exposure to Pesticides May Boost Stroke Risk

Working around high levels of pesticides may translate into a high risk for heart trouble later, a new study suggests.

That was the case for a group of Japanese-American men in Hawaii who were followed for more than three decades. Compared to men who had not worked around pesticides, those who had the greatest exposure had a 45% higher risk for heart disease or stroke, researchers...

Flavored E-Cigarettes May Make Asthma Worse

Black licorice, banana pudding and other flavored electronic cigarette liquids may make respiratory diseases like asthma worse, a new international study finds.

Vaping has surged in recent years, especially among young people. An estimated 9% of 18- to 24-year-olds use e-cigarettes in the United States.

The new study comes just after the Trump administration announced ...

Chemicals From Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Devices Not Harmless: Study

Chemical emissions from heat-not-burn tobacco devices are lower than from conventional cigarettes, but they're still high enough to be cause for concern, researchers report.

The makers of such devices claim that they produce a "clean" vapor that contains fewer irritants and cancer-causing chemicals than a traditional cigarette, and are therefore less dangerous.

"We found th...

Are Hookahs Safer Than Cigarettes? Chemical Study Says No Way

Hookahs may be more dangerous than other types of smoking due to high levels of toxic chemicals, carbon monoxide and ultrafine particles, researchers warn.

Water pipes used to smoke specially made flavored tobacco have become increasingly popular, and 1 in 5 college students in the United States and Europe has tried them.

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, ...

Clues to Why Epileptic Seizures Can Halt Breathing

Higher levels of the brain chemical serotonin are linked to a lower risk of potentially deadly seizure-related breathing pauses in people with epilepsy, researchers say.

The findings suggest serotonin may help protect people with epilepsy from this threat, according to the authors of the study published in the Sept. 4 online issue of the journal Neurology.

"Serotonin,...

Body's Natural Chemicals May Help Protect 9/11 Responders' Health: Study

Certain chemicals made by the body may have helped prevent lung disease in some first responders who were exposed to toxic dust after the World Trade Center was destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001, researchers say.

The investigators, from New York University School of Medicine, identified 30 metabolites -- chemicals made as the body breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates -- associated w...

Diving Deeper Into Sunscreen's Impact on Marine Life

Is the sunscreen you slather on your body marketed as safe for coral reefs? New research suggests those claims may not be entirely true.

Trace metals and other compounds in many sunscreens have unknown effects on marine ecology, say researchers studying Mediterranean waters.

Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet-screening ingredients in sunscreens can harm coral and o...

Plastics Chemicals Meant to Replace BPA May Not Be Any Safer for Kids

Manufacturers have been phasing out the plastics chemical bisphenol A because of evidence it might harm human health. Now a new study raises questions about the chemicals that have replaced it.

Bisphenol A, or BPA, has long been used in plastics. It was once in a wide range of products -- including the lining of food cans, food storage containers, water bottles and even the coating on...

Is Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?

Most people consider their bed a safe haven, but new research suggests your body heat might trigger the release of potentially harmful chemicals from your mattress.

Mattresses are known to release minute amounts of gaseous chemicals called volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs come mainly from the polyurethane used in the mattress, but also from other chemicals used in flame r...

Household Chemicals Might Be Sparking Rise in Thyroid Disease Among Cats

Could the newer flame retardants now being used in many household products be making cats sick?

A new study says it's possible.

Rates of hyperthyroidism, the most common endocrine-related disease of older cats, have soared since the first case was diagnosed in 1979, researchers report.

Cats with the disease experience weight loss, increased appetite, and increased ...

Another Vaping Danger: E-Cigarette Explodes in Teen's Face

A vape pen exploded in the face of 17-year-old Nevada boy, breaking his jaw and requiring multiple surgeries to repair the damage, according to a case report in the latest New England Journal of Medicine.

The 2018 incident highlights a little-known danger of e-cigarettes -- the devices can unexpectedly blow up, causing burns and severe facial damage.

"He was [using] t...

Swallowing Toiletries, Makeup Sends Thousands of Kids to ER Each Year

Take a stroll down the beauty products aisle and you'll see rows of colorful packages, even some with pictures of fruit on them. It's easy to see how about a dozen kids a day end up in the emergency room due to exposure to these enticing chemical concoctions.

Over a 15-year period, nearly 65,000 youngsters under 5 years of age were treated in U.S. emergency departments for injuries r...

50 Years After Ban, Canadian Lakes Still Have High Levels of DDT

Although DDT was banned in the 1970s, the toxic pesticide still lurks in the sediment of lakes in New Brunswick, Canada, researchers report.

To control insects, airplanes sprayed nearly 6,300 tons of DDT onto New Brunswick forests between 1952 and 1968.

Sprayed DDT can enter lakes and rivers, and find its way into the food chain, researchers say.

To see if DDT had ...

Roundup Linked to Human Liver Damage: Study

The popular weed killer Roundup might be linked to liver disease, a new study suggests.

A group of patients suffering from liver disease had elevated urine levels of glyphosate, the primary weed-killing ingredient in Roundup, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

"We found those patients who had more severe disease had higher levels of [...

Pool Chemicals Harm Thousands Every Summer

Swimming pools are one of the great joys of summer, but U.S. health officials warn that the chemicals that keep the water pristine can land you in the ER.

Between 2008 and 2017, there were more than 4,500 pool chemical-related injuries reported each year, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

"Summer is a great time to enjoy the pool wi...

Stay Safe While Spring Cleaning

While it's a regular ritual, spring cleaning can become a dangerous chore for your health, experts warn.

Some cleaning supplies -- air fresheners, rug cleaners, bleach, oven cleaners and floor polish -- have dangerous chemicals such as volatile organic compounds.

These chemicals become vapors that can irritate the nose, throat, eyes and lungs, said Dr. Timothy Craig, an alle...

Well Water's Spillover Effect: Heart Damage?

Does your home draw its water source from a well? A new study finds that well water may be injurious to heart health in young adults -- if it contains arsenic.

"People drinking water from private wells, which are not regulated, need to be aware that arsenic may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease," said study author Dr. Gernot Pichler. He is an internal medicine specialist at...

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels:  Study

For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.

Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test subjects applied spray, lotion and cream...

Pesticides Tied to Autism Risk in Kids

Children who are exposed to common pesticides, either while in the womb or in the first year of life, may be more likely to develop autism, a new study suggests.

While the researchers stressed that it's premature to say that pesticide exposure actually causes autism, they pointed out that theirs is not the first investigation to sound alarm bells on the dangers that pesticides might p...

Common Household Chemicals Harm Sperm in Both Men and Dogs

Two chemicals found in household products and food could harm male fertility in both dogs and people, U.K. researchers say.

The chemicals are the plasticizer DEHP -- used in products such as carpets, flooring, upholstery, clothes, wires and toys -- and the industrial chemical polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (PCB153). Even though it is banned worldwide, PCB153 is still widely present in t...

Hookah Smoke Can Contain More Toxins Than Cigarettes, Experts Warn

Hookah users inhale high levels of toxic chemicals that endanger the heart and blood vessels.

That's the stark warning in a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement.

A single half-hour session of smoking tobacco in a hookah typically exposes the user to more carbon monoxide than a single cigarette. Even short-term exposure to carbon monoxide in the water pip...

Radioactive Chemo Meds Might Threaten Crematorium Workers: Study

Deceased people who are cremated after having been treated with radioactive medications might be a health hazard to crematory operators, a new case study shows.

An Arizona crematorium became contaminated with radiation following the cremation of a man who received "radiopharmaceutical" treatment two days before he died, according to a research letter published Feb. 26 in the Journ...

Toxins in Home Furnishings Can Be Passed on to Kids

Children who live in homes with vinyl flooring and flame-retardant furniture have higher levels of potentially harmful chemicals in their blood or urine, researchers have found.

The new study included 203 children from 190 families who were tested for these chemicals -- so-called semi-volatile organic compounds (or SVOCs) -- in their blood or urine.

For the study, the rese...

Possible Parkinson's 'Pandemic' Looms: Report

The number of people living with Parkinson's disease worldwide could double in the next two decades, experts project.

In a report warning of a possible Parkinson's "pandemic," researchers say the stage is set for cases to surge to 12 million or more by 2040.

What's to blame? In large part, trends that are generally positive: Older age is a major risk factor for Parkinson's, ...

Breast Cancer and DDT: Timing of Exposure May Matter

Exposure to high levels of the pesticide DDT increases breast cancer risk -- but when the cancer surfaces depends on when women first came in contact with the chemical, researchers say.

"What we have learned is that timing really matters," said lead author Barbara Cohn, from the California-based Public Health Institute.

"We know that if harmful exposures occur at times when ...

Head, Neck Cancers Up Among 9-11 Responders: Study

Head and neck cancers among a group of first responders to the 9/11 World Trade Center terrorist attacks are significantly higher than expected, a new study says.

Rutgers University researchers found that diagnoses of these cancers increased 40 percent in a group of WTC workers and volunteers over a four-year period.

The findings suggest there are emerging health risks amon...

How to Safely Use Plastic Containers in Your Microwave

For many, a microwave is indispensable, but questions remain about the safety of containers used to cook and reheat food in it.

Most of the controversy surrounds the chemicals used to make plastic containers soft or clear, like BPA and phthalates. These chemicals are called endocrine disrupters, because they can mimic hormones such as estrogen in a bad way. The chemicals can leach int...

Move Over, Air Filter. Scientists Have a Greener Idea

A common houseplant to help keep your home's air cleaner and safer?

Scientists report they have genetically altered pothos ivy to filter certain hazardous chemicals from household air.

Many people use HEPA air filters to reduce levels of allergens and dust particles in their homes. But the molecules of the chemicals benzene and chloroform are too small to be trapped in these...

Hispanics Bear Brunt of Exposure to Workplace Hazards: Study

Exposure to metals and pesticides at work could increase risk of heart disease, researchers say.

Hispanic workers in the United States may be especially vulnerable because of language barriers and lower levels of education, the study authors noted.

"Exposure to metals and pesticides is common worldwide, and this study highlights the need to better understand the risks that t...

Hidden Dangers in Dust

An antibacterial called triclosan is common in dust and could result in dust-dwelling bacteria becoming antibiotic-resistant, researchers report.

"There is this conventional wisdom that says everything that's in dust is dead, but that's not actually the case. There are things living in there," said study leader Erica Hartmann, an assistant professor of environmental engineering at Nor...