New features, new look and now mobile-responsive! No need to re-register.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Child Development".

12 Nov

Infant Sleep and Mental Development

How many consecutive hours should your baby be sleeping at 6 months of age?

30 Oct

Chemicals and Language Development

Prenatal exposure to chemicals found in plastics may delay language development.

Health News Results - 325

Scientists Uncover More Autism Genes

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that underscores the major role genetics plays in autism risk, researchers report they have identified 16 new genes linked to the developmental disorder.

The investigators conducted genetic analyses of 2,300 people from nearly 500 families with at least two children with autism. Of the children in the study, 960 had autism and 21...

ADHD Meds May Alter Boys' Brains

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One of the most popular and effective medications used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to alter the brains of boys with the disorder, a new study shows.

While the researchers couldn't say for certain whether the changes were good or bad, one ADHD expert thinks the findings suggest the changes help young males ...

Could Exercise in Pregnancy Boost Baby's Health, Too?

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women who keep moving during pregnancy may have infants with more advanced motor skills, a small study suggests.

Researchers discovered the difference among 1-month-olds: Those whose moms got regular aerobic exercise during pregnancy tended to have stronger movement skills, versus babies whose mothers did not.

The movement tests inc...

Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Kids

WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people wait until they're older to have children, and that decision can raise the risk of problems like infertility and genetic abnormalities. But new research suggests there may be at least one benefit to having children later in life.

The study found that kids with at least one older parent were less likely to be defiant rule-breaker...

A Change of Address During Early Pregnancy May Not Be Best for Baby

TUESDAY, July 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If moving is never easy, then moving while you are pregnant has got to be a grueling experience.

But could it actually harm your baby? Yes, a new investigation warns.

The researchers found that switching homes during the first three months of pregnancy was tied to an increased risk that a baby would be born prematurely or at a low b...

High Levels of Estrogen in Womb Might Raise Autism Risk

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New British research is bolstering the theory that elevated levels of sex hormones in the uterus could play a role in autism risk.

Prior studies had already implicated higher uterine concentrations of male sex hormones -- androgens -- in increasing the odds for an autism spectrum disorder, noted a team led by Simon Baron-Cohen. He directs the ...

Brain Changes Noted in Holocaust Survivors and Their Children

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Holocaust survivors may have suffered permanent harmful changes to their brain structure, and the brains of their children and grandchildren may also be affected, a small study reveals.

"After more than 70 years, the impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant," said researcher Ivan Rektor, a neurologist from Brno, Cze...

What Happens to the Children When Parents Fight?

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Don't fight in front of the kids."

Sounds like familiar advice that's been passed down from generation to generation. But as it turns out, it's not always the fighting, but rather the way you fight that can have a negative -- or a positive -- effect on your children.

Researchers E. Mark Cummings and Patrick Davies have studied th...

Pregnant Women Exposed to More Risky CT Scans

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of risky CT scans during pregnancy has risen significantly in North America in the past two decades, a new study finds.

"It's important to quantify exposure to ionizing radiation because it can cause cancer and birth defects, and should be kept to a minimum, especially during pregnancy," said co-lead author Marilyn Kwan. She's a senior ...

ADHD Meds Help Keep Kids Out of Trouble

TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some parents may be reluctant to give their kids powerful stimulants to treat the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but a new review shows the medications bring significant benefits.

In addition to helping kids calm down and concentrate in school, the review also found that the drugs help children avoid a lot of lon...

'Failure to Launch': Poll Finds Many Older Teens Still Too Reliant on Parents

MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sarah Clark was happy to get the call from her college teen, but couldn't believe what she was hearing.

"My kid called from college and said, 'I'm sick, what should I do?'" Clark said. "I'm like, what do you mean what do you do? You have a drug store down the street. Go have at it."

A new poll co-directed by Clark found that there ar...

Many Youngsters Aren't Ready for Kindergarten

MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The start of school is just around the corner, but a leading pediatricians' group warns that many kids entering kindergarten lack the skills they need to succeed in class.

To help parents get their young ones ready to start school, the American Academy of Pediatrics has just released a report on what helps boost success as well as what factors...

High-Fiber Diets Might Shield Against a Common Pregnancy Complication

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More vegetables, more whole grains: New research finds that diets rich in fiber might help pregnant women avoid a dangerous spike in blood pressure.

The common obstetric complication is called preeclampsia, and it occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies. It's characterized by high blood pressure, protein in the urine and severe swelling in the ...

Does Being a Preemie Doom Your Love Life?

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Preemie babies face a host of potential lifelong health problems, but a new analysis suggests the cards of love might also be stacked against them.

Previous studies have found that premature babies -- especially the tiniest ones -- face some long-term difficulties. The issues go beyond physical health: As preemies get older they tend to lag b...

Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before Birth

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research shows that neurological damage for babies who were exposed to the Zika virus while in the womb continues to unfold years after birth.

Developmental problems were found in one-third of the 216 children studied, some of whom were 3 years old. The problems affected language, thinking and motor skills development. Some also had eye a...

Reacting Against a 'Too Clean' World, Some Parents Go Too Far the Other Way

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Somewhere between the Mom who obsessively wipes down every knob and toy her child might touch, and the Dad who thinks rolling in the dirt is "good" for kids, there's a healthy medium, British experts say.

"We have to find a way to protect against infectious diseases and harmful microbes, whilst at the same time sustaining exposure to the ess...

Surgery Helps Babies Missing a Heart Chamber Survive, But Problems Linger

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When babies are born without one heart chamber, a special surgery can save their lives. But a new study shows that these patients face lifelong health issues that require special care.

Still, a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement says, they can have rich and fulfilling lives.

A normal heart has two lower chambe...

How Does Sunshine During Pregnancy Affect Learning?

TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids whose moms don't get enough sunshine during pregnancy may be more likely to develop learning difficulties, researchers report.

The finding stems from data on more than 422,000 school-aged children in Scotland. Low levels of exposure to UVB rays -- but not UVA sunlight -- during the entire pregnancy was linked to learning disabilities lat...

How to Foster Your Child's Imagination

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With school, sports and assorted activities, many kids have little or no free time. That fast-paced lifestyle can actually stifle their development, making them less likely to be self-starters.

It could also limit their imagination, an important ingredient in creativity and problem-solving.

University of Colorado-Boulder researchers ...

Will Video Games Make Your Kid Obese? Maybe Not

THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- To the millions of parents who worry about the extra pounds their child might pile on while playing Xbox all day, rest easy.

A new study suggests that video game-loving kids aren't any heavier than those who aren't into the gaming scene.

Childhood obesity affects an estimated 13.7 million children and adolescents in the United Stat...

Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors Face More Struggles

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors often face intellectual and financial struggles, a new study finds.

Advances in treatment have prolonged the lives of many childhood brain tumor patients, but survivors may have to contend with a number of effects from the disease and its treatment, the researchers noted.

To learn more, the...

Kindergarten Behavior Linked to Life Earnings in Study

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Believe it or not, how your kid acts in kindergarten might impact his earning potential years later, a new study suggests.

Canadian researchers found that boys and girls who were identified by their kindergarten teachers as inattentive earned nearly $1,300 less a year than their more focused peers.

Additionally, boys identified ...

More Women Using Pot During Pregnancy, Despite Potential Harms to Baby

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As laws around marijuana relax nationwide and the drug becomes more popular, American women are increasingly using pot during pregnancy, a new study finds.

The study was based on data from more than 467,000 women collected between 2002 and 2017. The researchers found that the percentage of women who said they'd used cannabis at least once dur...

How to Recognize Early Learning Challenges in Kids

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many children have difficulty with learning at some point, but those with learning disabilities often have several specific and persistent signs, which can start in preschool years. Recognizing them as soon as possible allows a child to get needed help and make better progress.

General signs include difficulty with reading, writing, math skill...

Later School Start Time Pays Off With More Attentive Students

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a no-brainer -- not getting enough sleep makes it harder for kids to learn. And a new study finds that starting school later in the morning can help teens be more alert during the day.

In 2017, the Cherry Creek School District in Greenwood Village, Colo., changed start times from 8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. for its middle school students and ...

Can Playing a Sport Foster Better-Adjusted Kids?

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a young child involved in organized sports may have a mental health payoff down the line, according to a new study.

Kids who had participated in athletic programs between ages 6 and 10 had less emotional distress, anxiety and shyness by age 12. They were also less likely to suffer from social withdrawal, researchers found.

"Th...

Few Days of Formula Feeding After Delivery Won't Harm Breastfed Babies

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your newborn is breastfeeding and losing weight, will feeding her formula do any harm?

Though doctors have long advised against it, a new study suggests giving baby both formula and the breast is OK.

Researchers said the answer depends on how long a mother intends to breastfeed and it needs to be balanced against the risks newbor...

Nursing Moms Who Eat Right Have Slimmer, Healthier Babies

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding moms with healthy eating habits have slimmer infants, who could then be protected from obesity later, researchers say.

Rapid weight gain and fat accumulation during an infant's first six months of life is a risk factor for obesity later on, they explained.

"A baby who is shooting up through the percentiles in weight-fo...

Teasing Kids About Weight Linked to More Weight Gain

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research illustrates a heartbreaking, vicious cycle: Teasing kids about their weight not only bruises their self-esteem, it also appears to trigger more weight gain.

In fact, middle schoolers who reported high levels of weight-related teasing had a 33% higher jump in their body mass index per year compared to peers who weren't teased ...

Team Sports Could Help Traumatized Kids Grow Into Healthy Adults

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adul...

How Kids Benefit From Doing Chores

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chores. Whether you're an adult or a child, the very word makes any job sound less than fun.

But these everyday tasks make households run, and engaging kids in age-appropriate chores from an early age teaches them invaluable life skills, instills in them a sense of responsibility and boosts self-esteem through accomplishment, according to the...

Older Dads' Sperm Isn't What It Used to Be

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just because a guy can make babies later in life doesn't mean it's risk-free.

The partners and children of men who become fathers at an older age are at increased risk for health problems, a new study finds.

"While it is widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy and the h...

Earlier Bedtimes Help Kids Fight Obesity

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With childhood obesity rates high, many studies have investigated lifestyle factors that can make a difference -- which ones increase the risk and which ones reduce it.

Beyond diet, a lack of sleep has been linked to weight gain both in adults and children, so it's important that kids get enough shuteye, even with their -- and your -- busy sc...

What to Do When Your Child Throws a Fit

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a wel...

Low Birth Weight Babies a Worldwide Problem

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 million babies are born across the globe weighing far less than they should, and the problem isn't limited to low-income countries, new research shows.

In 2015, nearly three-quarters of infants with low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds) were born in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. But low birth weights persist in high-i...

More Active Lupus Linked to Childhood Events

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds.

Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges.

The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of those, about 63% reported at ...

Pokeman Characters Linger in Brain Well Past Childhood

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Play plenty of Pokemon as a child, and your brain may tuck your favorite characters away in a special place where they are never forgotten.

Researchers from Stanford University believe that's exactly what happened with a small group of adults they tested.

"It's been an open question in the field why we have brain regions that respond t...

About 1 in 1,000 Babies Born 'Intersex,' Study Finds

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cases in which a newborn's genitals make it unclear whether the child is a boy or girl may be more common than once believed, researchers say.

One example of what's known as ambiguous genitalia is a baby girl with an enlarged clitoris that looks more like a small penis, the study authors explained.

In some cases, infants have external ...

Developmental Tests Might Spot Autism at Even Younger Ages

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a child with autism is diagnosed, the better, and now new research describes a novel way of catching it earlier than ever.

Well-child visits that include developmental screening might pick up the first hints of autism risk in some children, the study suggests.

"We think this has the potential to identify children at risk fo...

'Microbiome' May Be Key to Autism Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The belly-brain connection is gaining traction in autism research. And a new study suggests gut bacteria may play a role in the disorder or some of its symptoms.

Although this research is in its infancy, it's hoped that someday scientists might tweak the gut bacteria to ease digestive symptoms of autism spectrum disorder.

The latest...

Autism Diagnoses Reliable at 14 Months, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 8...

Many Smokers Switch to Vaping While Pregnant, But Safety Issues Remain

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are many women who smoke switching to e-cigarettes during pregnancy?

That's the suggestion from a new study that finds close to 4% of pregnant American women are vaping, and the rate of e-cigarette use is actually higher among pregnant women than women who aren't pregnant.

The researchers also found that e-cigarette use in pregn...

Breast Milk Has Biggest Benefit for Preemies' Brains: Study

SATURDAY, April 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Another reason breast is best: Breast milk boosts levels of chemicals crucial for brain growth and development in premature babies with a very low birth weight, a new study reveals.

"Our previous research established that vulnerable preterm infants who are fed breast milk early in life have improved brain growth ...

1 in 9 U.S. Women Drink During Pregnancy, and Numbers Are Rising

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even though the harms to babies are well known, one in nine pregnant women in the United States drinks alcohol, new research shows.

In one-third of those cases, frequent binge drinking is also often involved.

What's more, the rate of drinking during pregnancy is actually on the rise, with a slight uptick in the rate over the past ...

Young Adults With Autism Need Jobs, But Resources Vary By State

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of news about the dramatic rise in the number of children with autism and the services available to them, but less attention has been paid to what happens when those kids grow up.

Now, a new study suggests that finding a job can be a struggle, and just how much of a struggle it is can vary widely from state to state.

<...

3 Parenting Essentials to Safeguard Kids' Well-Being

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a parent, you want to do everything right to nurture your child. Besides serving healthy food and encouraging daily exercise, three other lifestyle habits can have a huge impact on your child's mental and physical well-being and development.

In an article in JAMA Pediatrics, Dr. Dimitri Christakis, of the Seattle Children's Res...

Video Games Don't Hamper Boys' Social Skills, Study Finds

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Does playing a lot of video games really jeopardize a boy's ability to make and keep friends?

Maybe not, reports a team of Norwegian and American researchers.

Investigators spent six years tracking the gaming habits and social interactions of nearly 900 Norwegian children from ages 6 to 12. They found that as a whole, children who ...

AHA News: With Humor -- and Brain-Shaped Jell-O -- This Doctor Teaches Kids About Health

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- One of the most valuable lessons in pediatrician April Inniss' medical career came from an 8-year-old boy.

Inniss was just out of medical school and was asked to draw blood from the terrified young patient at a Boston hospital. The child was diagnosed with chronic stomach issues, and had a distrust of health care providers....

Strict Blood Pressure Limits for Kids Tied to Heart Health Later

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tighter high blood pressure guidelines for children might better spot those at risk for heart disease in adulthood, a new study suggests.

Compared to 2004 guidelines, the updated 2017 guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the number of children considered to have high blood pressure.

But it wasn't known if the...

More TV, Tablets, More Attention Issues at Age 5

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

Show All Health News Results