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17 Sep

A Single Session Of Aerobic Exercise Can Make You Smarter

Researchers say even a two-minute workout may boost your brain power

Health News Results - 370

Road to Healthy Middle-Aged Brain May Begin in Childhood

MONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Could having heart disease risk factors in childhood sow the seeds of thinking declines in middle-age?

It looks like it might, new research claims.

"I think it was not so big of a surprise for us, but maybe for the scientific community who have been focusing mainly on the midlife risk factors and old-age cognition," said st...

Why Sleep Raises Risk for Sudden Death in People With Epilepsy

New research gives insight into why people with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden death during sleep.

The study found that both sleep and epileptic seizures work together to slow heart rate, and that seizures also disrupt the body's natural regulation of sleep-related changes.

These factors can sometimes lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), which caused the 20...

Failing Kidneys Could Bring Higher Dementia Risk

Chronic kidney disease may carry an increased risk of dementia, according to a Swedish study.

In people with chronic kidney disease, the bean-shaped organs gradually lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids.

"Even a mild reduction in kidney function has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and infections, and there is growing evide...

How a Little Alcohol Might Help the Heart

A bit of booze may help protect your heart by reducing stress-related brain activity, a new study suggests.

"The thought is that moderate amounts of alcohol may have effects on the brain that can help you relax, reduce stress levels and, perhaps through these mechanisms, lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease," said lead author Dr. Kenechukwu Mezue, a nuclear cardiology fellow at M...

1 in 4 U.S. Teens Has Had a Concussion: Study

WEDNESDAY, May 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in four American teens has suffered at least one concussion, according to new research.

And though more teens are self-reporting sports-related concussions, visits to the emergency room for these traumatic head injuries fell between 2012 and 2018.

"One reason that could explain why adolescents who participate i...

'Ghosts and Guardian Angels': New Insights Into Parkinson's Hallucinations

MONDAY, May 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease is widely seen as a movement disorder, but it can cause an array of symptoms, including hallucinations. Now a new study has shed light on what is happening in the brain during those disturbances.

The study focused on Parkinson's patients who have so-called presence hallucinations -- a false feeling that another...

Breathing Dirty Air Could Raise a Child's Risk for Adult Mental Illness

THURSDAY, April 29, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Kids exposed to air pollution may be at risk for mental illness in early adulthood, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that young adults in Britain who were exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollutants during their childhood and teen years were prone to develop symptoms of mental illness later. Nitrogen oxi...

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

TUESDAY, April 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect rela...

Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

Lullaby Effect: Music Can Speed Your Way to Sleep, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 26, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Music hath charms to soothe you off to slumber, new research suggests.

The study found that calming tunes at bedtime seem to help older people struggling with insomnia.

"We found music therapy was effective for older adults with sleep disturbance," said study co-author Yen-Chin Chen, an associate professor of nursing at N...

How 'Bleeding' Stroke Affects Brain May Depend on Your Race

Black and Hispanic survivors of a bleeding stroke are more likely than white survivors to have changes in small blood vessels in the brain that increase the risk of another bleeding stroke, researchers say.

'Bleeding' strokes, also called hemorrhagic stroke, comprise about 13% of all strokes. They occur when an artery in the brain leaks or ruptures.

"While Black and Hispanic bleedin...

Brain Study Suggests Autism Develops Differently in Girls Than Boys

Autism appears to develop differently in girls and boys, so the findings of research conducted mainly with boys might not apply to girls, a new study suggests.

Autism spectrum disorder is four times more common in boys, which may help explain why there's far less research about autism in girls.

"This new study provides us with a roadmap for understanding how to better match current...

Could Chronic Sinusitis Affect Brain Health?

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As if the headaches and stuffy nose aren't bad enough, chronic sinus trouble often leaves patients foggy-headed and depressed. Now, new research suggests one possible reason why: Sinusitis may trigger changes in brain activity.

"Chronic sinusitis is incredibly common," said study lead author Dr. Aria Jafari. Upwards of 11% ...

High School Football Doesn't Affect Brain in Middle Age, Study Says

Here's some good news for aging athletes: If you played high school football, you're no more likely than others to have problems with concentration, memory or depression in middle age, according to a new study.

"Men who played high school football did not report worse brain health compared with those who played other contact sports, noncontact sports, or did not participate in sports dur...

It's a Scream: Human Brains Alert to Positive Shrieks

Screams have different meanings, and you're likely to respond quicker to screams of joy than to those of anger or fear, a new study suggests.

Previous research has largely focused on screams triggered by alarm or fear.

In this study, a team from the University of Zurich in Switzerland examined the meaning behind different human screams and identified six emotionally distinct types: ...

COVID Plus 'Bleeding' Stroke Doubles a Patient's Death Risk

'Bleeding' stroke patients with COVID-19 are more than twice as likely to die as those without COVID-19, new research shows.

For the study, a research team from the University of Utah analyzed data from 568 hospitals in the United States. They compared a control group of more than 23,300 patients without COVID-19 who suffered a bleeding (hemorrhagic) stroke to 771 COVID-19 patients who ha...

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims.

Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than those in affluent neighborhoods.

""Worldwide, dementia is a major cause of illness and a devastating diagnosis," said study author Dr. Amy Kind, of the University of ...

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.

The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.

Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33 with bulimia and a control group of 30 without an eating disorder). The study participants were assessed for two days t...

Many Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic Symptoms

In very rare cases, children infected with the new coronavirus can develop a severe illness known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Now, research finds that these young patients often develop neurologic symptoms along with the respiratory issues they might face.

These neurologic symptoms were present in half of children who were hospitalized with MIS-C, U.K. researchers say.

Research Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer's

Don't forget to floss: New research adds to evidence linking gum disease with Alzheimer's disease.

The mouth is home to both harmful bacteria that promote inflammation and healthy, protective bacteria, the study authors explained.

In the new study, the researchers found that people who have more harmful than healthy gum bacteria were more likely to also have a protein marker for Al...

Some Kids Snore, and It Could Affect Behavior

Snoring just isn't for adults, and behavior problems in kids who regularly snore may be due to changes in their brain structure, researchers say.

Prior studies have found a link between regular snoring and behavior problems such as inattention or hyperactivity, but this connection isn't fully understood.

And a few small studies have reported a link between sleep apnea -- prolonged b...

Is Empathy Born in Mom's First Hugs?

Show your baby your love, and you'll get a kinder, gentler adult child as your reward, a new study suggests.

More than 20 years ago, researchers in Israel began studying the impact on newborns of time spent in physical contact with their mothers.

The investigators followed these infants, born in the mid- to late-1990s, for two decades.

Now, their latest results -- based on n...

More Kids With Autism May Be Doing Well Than Thought

School-age children with autism may be faring better than commonly thought, with most "doing well" in at least some aspects of development, a new study suggests.

The study, of 272 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), found that nearly 80% were doing well in at least one of five developmental areas by age 10. Nearly one-quarter were doing well in four of those areas.

The res...

Many Recovering COVID Patients Show Signs of Long-Term Organ Damage

Long-term organ damage appears to be common in hospitalized COVID-19 patients after they've recovered and been discharged, British researchers report.

One U.S. expert who read over the report said she's seen the same in her practice.

"This study proves that the damage done is not just to the lungs, but can affect the heart, the brain and the kidneys, as well," said Dr. Mangala Naras...

Some Hospitalized COVID Patients Develop Seizures

COVID-19 can harm multiple organs in the body, including the brain. Now, a new study says some hospitalized COVID-19 patients have non-convulsive seizures that may increase their risk of death.

"Seizures are a very common complication of severe critical illness. Most of these seizures are not obvious: Unlike seizures that make a person fall down and shake, or convulse, seizures in critica...

How Learning a New Language Changes Your Brain

Brain activity increases when you start to learn a new language, but slows down as you become more proficient, a new, small study finds.

"In the first few months, you can quantitatively measure language-skill improvement by tracking brain activations," study co-author Kuniyoshi Sakai, a neuroscientist at the University of Tokyo, said in a school news release.

The study included 15 n...

Loneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer's

Middle-aged folks who feel persistently lonely appear to have a nearly doubled risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports.

If you take steps to counter your loneliness, however, you might actually reduce your dementia risk, the researchers found.

Dementia risk rose 91% in those who reported feelings of loneliness that persisted across two separate health...

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For the study, researchers analyzed gene expression using fresh brain tissue collected during routine surgery and found that...

A Stressed Brain Might Play Role in 'Broken Heart' Syndrome

The brain may play a role in so-called broken heart syndrome, a new study suggests.

Formally known as Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), it's a temporary -- but potentially deadly -- heart condition brought on by stressful situations and emotions.

In this study, published March 25 in the European Heart Journal, researchers wanted to find out if increased stress-associated metabolic ...

Exercise Boosts Blood Flow to Brain, Keeping it Sharp

Regular aerobic exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which may help slow mental decline in older adults, a new, small study suggests.

Researchers from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at 70 men and women diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This means there are slight changes to the brain that affect memory, decision-making or reasoning skills. In m...

'Game of Thrones' Study Reveals the Power of Fiction on the Mind

It's not unusual for a fictional character to ring such a chord that their story shapes your life.

Think of educators inspired by Robin Williams' character in "Dead Poets Society," lawyers drawn to the profession by Perry Mason or Atticus Finch, or health professionals motivated by the doctors on "ER" or "Grey's Anatomy."

Now researchers think they've figured out why fiction can so ...

Some Folks Do Age Slower Than Others

People really do vary in how fast they age, and the divergence starts in young adulthood, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that by the tender age of 45, people with a faster pace of "biological aging" were more likely to feel, function and look far older than they actually were. And that relative sprint toward old age began in their 20s.

The findings, the study authors sa...

Minutes Mean Months: Getting Stroke Care Fast Is Vital, Study Confirms

For someone suffering a severe stroke, every 10 minutes that goes by before treatment starts in the emergency room may cost eight weeks of a healthy life, Canadian researchers report.

In fact, delays in the hospital may have worse consequences for recovery than delays in getting to the hospital, they noted.

"Our study confirmed that any delay in delivering appropriate stroke treatme...

Could Low-Dose Aspirin Help Shield You From COVID-19?

It's already being taken by millions to help ward off heart issues, and now preliminary research hints that daily low-dose aspirin might also cut your odds of contracting COVID-19.

As the Israeli research team noted, aspirin is an anti-inflammatory and previous studies have shown that it may help the immune system combat some viral infections. According to the researchers, aspirin was wid...

Could a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?

About 7 out of 10 Alzheimer's patients wound up free of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of the disease after treatment with a potentially breakthrough experimental drug, clinical trial results show.

The drug, donanemab, also significantly slowed the patients' brain decline, according to findings published March 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Donanemab diss...

Clocks 'Spring Forward' on Sunday: Be Prepared

Many people dread the switch to daylight saving time. When you're losing an hour of sleep, it can be hard to actually feel like springing forward.

Dr. Rachel Ziegler, a sleep medicine physician from the Mayo Clinic Health System in Fairmont, Minn., offers some tips for easing into the time change before it happens on March 14.

Ziegler recommends getting to bed 15 minutes early now, ...

Your Eyes May Signal Your Risk for Stroke, Dementia

Your eyes may be a window into the health of your brain, a new study indicates.

Researchers found that older adults with the eye disease retinopathy were at increased risk of having a stroke, as well as possible symptoms of dementia. And on average, they died sooner than people their age without the eye condition.

Retinopathy refers to a disease the retina, the light-sensing tissue ...

Even 1 Concussion May Raise Your Odds for Dementia Later

Sustaining just one head injury may up your chances of developing dementia decades later by 25%, and this risk increases with each subsequent head injury, new research suggests.

"Head injury is not the only risk factor for dementia as high blood pressure and diabetes, among others, also contribute significantly to dementia risk, but head injury is one risk factor for dementia that is modi...

For Amputees, a New Kind of Surgery May Allow Better Control, Sensation

A new type of surgery offers amputees better control of muscles that remain after surgery, and of their prosthetic limbs, its inventors say.

The standard surgical approach to amputation has changed little since the American Civil War, according to developers of the new approach. In their small study, the new procedure also helped curb pain and sensations like the troubling "phantom limb" ...

Add Sleep Woes to Long-Term Effects of Concussions

Concussions can increase the long-term risk of a wide range of sleep disorders, a new study indicates.

Researchers looked at more than 98,700 U.S. veterans diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the same number of veterans with no history of TBI. The brain injuries ranged from mild TBI (concussion) to severe.

None of the participants had sleep disorders at the start of th...

'Rerouting' Brain Blood Flow: Old Technique Could Be New Advance Against Strokes

Doctors are testing a decades-old surgical technique as a new way to treat certain stroke patients. And the preliminary results look promising, they say.

At issue are strokes caused by intracranial atherosclerosis, where blood vessels within the brain become hardened and narrowed.

Strokes occur when the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, depriving tissue of oxygen and nutrients...

Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

The position played in sports like football and hockey isn't associated with risk of a concussion-linked brain disease later in life, a new study suggests.

The number of years played doesn't affect risk of the neurodegenerative disease -- chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- either, researchers found.

CTE has been linked with repeated blows to the head. Symptoms include behavio...

Mediterranean Diet Could Keep Aging Brains Sharp

Helping your brain stay sharp with age may be as simple as changing up the food on your plate at dinnertime, a new study suggests.

The study focused on the healthy "Mediterranean" diet, a regimen reliant on olive oil, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, with chicken and fish largely replacing red meat. Dairy products and eggs are only used in "low to moderate amounts," accor...

Why Some 'Super Ager' Folks Keep Their Minds Dementia-Free

Researchers may have uncovered a key reason some people remain sharp as a tack into their 80s and 90s: Their brains resist the buildup of certain proteins that mark Alzheimer's disease.

The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super agers" -- a select group of older folks who have the memory performance of people decades younger.

Compared with older people who had average b...

'What's Wrong With Me?' Young COVID Survivors Battle Long-Haul Symptoms

It's been nearly a year since David Speal, 38, first fell ill with COVID-19, but a racing heartbeat remains a regular reminder of his brush with the new coronavirus.

Even the littlest thing -- not eating at the right time, not drinking enough water, too much exercise, a stressful encounter -- can send Speal's heartbeat soaring as high as 150 beats per minute.

"My autonomic nervous s...

Even for Preschoolers, Healthier Hearts May Mean Healthier Brains

The link between heart-lung fitness and brain health may begin at an early age, new research shows.

The study revealed that 4- to 6-year-olds who could walk farther during a timed test also scored higher on tests of thinking abilities and other measures of brain function.

Most studies of the link between brain health and heart-lung ("cardiorespiratory") fitness have focused on older...

A Third of COVID Survivors Have Long-Haul Symptoms, Even After Mild Cases

Many patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 could become "long haulers," suffering symptoms months after they clear their non-life-threatening infection, new research shows.

About 33% of COVID-19 patients who were never sick enough to require hospitalization continue to complain months later of symptoms like fatigue, loss of smell or taste and "brain fog," University of Washington (UW) r...

Dementia Seen in Younger Adults Shows Even More Brain Damage Than Alzheimer's

White matter damage in the brains of adults with frontotemporal dementia is even greater than that seen in Alzheimer's disease patients, a new study shows.

Frontotemporal dementia often affects people younger than 65, mainly causing personality and behavior changes and problems with language, rather than memory. The researchers assessed areas of brain damage called white matter hyperinten...

Folks Can Have Real-Life Conversations While Dreaming, Study Finds

If you've ever had a "lucid dream" -- one in which you're aware you're dreaming -- new research just might jolt you awake.

Not only is it possible during these vivid dreams to perceive questions, but to answer them, too -- at least sometimes.

That's the tantalizing takeaway from four independent studies that used different methods to communicate with sleeping volunteers, including s...

Too Little Sleep Could Raise Your Dementia Risk

Older adults who get little sleep each night may be at heightened risk of dementia or earlier death, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among 2,600 older Americans, those who were deemed "short sleepers" -- catching no more than five hours of sleep at night -- were more likely to develop dementia or die over the next five years.

Their risks were double that of older people...

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