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11 May

Will The COVID-19 Lockdown Lead To A New Baby Boom?

Fears over potential pregnancy problems and the recession may postpone family planning, new study finds.

Health News Results - 366

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.

The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.

Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33 with bulimia and a control group of 30 without an eating disorder). The study participants were assessed for two days t...

America's STD Rate at Record High Again: CDC

There's another epidemic sweeping the United States: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Statistics for 2019 -- the latest data available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- show that STD rates in the United States hit a new high again for the sixth straight year.

In 2019, nearly 2.5 million Americans had an infection of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis, ...

Some Kids Snore, and It Could Affect Behavior

Snoring just isn't for adults, and behavior problems in kids who regularly snore may be due to changes in their brain structure, researchers say.

Prior studies have found a link between regular snoring and behavior problems such as inattention or hyperactivity, but this connection isn't fully understood.

And a few small studies have reported a link between sleep apnea -- prolonged b...

You're Not Imagining It: Dogs Do Get Jealous

Most dog owners have seen this dynamic in action, but a new study confirms that your canine companion can become jealous when you pay attention to another dog.

Researchers put 18 dogs in situations where they could imagine their owner interacting with either a realistic-looking fake dog or a fleece cylinder. The fake dog served as a potential rival for attention while the cylinder served ...

Making E-Cigs Cool: Singers, Models in Music Videos Get Teens Vaping

DJ Khaled, Halsey and other musicians are selling electronic cigarettes to young people through product placement in music videos that receive hundreds of millions of views, a pair of new studies report.

Overall, music videos identified as featuring e-cigarette product placements during a four-month period in 2018 received more than 1.6 billion total views on YouTube, researchers report i...

Do You 'Wolf Down' Your Food? Speedy Eaters May Pack on More Pounds

Are you the type to linger over a meal, or do you tend to eat quickly without giving it much thought?

New research confirms that you're better off going the slow route, because fast eaters tend to consume more and be more vulnerable to gaining weight and becoming obese. And it uncovers a new wrinkle: If you grew up with siblings, where you probably had to compete for whatever was on the t...

A Few People With COVID Went a Crowded Bar: Here's What Happened

COVID-19 is so contagious that even a single breach of social distancing measures can have far-reaching consequences.

A case in point: An explosion of new COVID-19 cases traced to five people who joined in on a bar's opening night in rural Illinois in February.

Four of the five who attended the crowded gathering (the bar's capacity was 100 people) were already experiencing symptom...

Regret That One-Night Stand? It Probably Won't Stop Another, Study Shows

You might think regret has an upside — to help you avoid repeating a mistake — but new research shows it's just not so, especially when it comes to casual sex.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology asked volunteers to fill out a questionnaire about sexual regret — twice, about 4½ months apart.

"For the most part, people continue with the same sex...

Forget the 'Lazy Stoner': Marijuana Users Don't Exercise Any Less

The stereotypical image of pot smokers has long been one of "stoners" parked on the couch, surrounded by snacks and glued to the television, but a new study dispels that notion.

Instead, people who use marijuana may exercise just as much as other people do, and perhaps even a little more, researchers report.

Considering how important regular exercise is to one's overall health, the ...

More Kids With Autism May Be Doing Well Than Thought

School-age children with autism may be faring better than commonly thought, with most "doing well" in at least some aspects of development, a new study suggests.

The study, of 272 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), found that nearly 80% were doing well in at least one of five developmental areas by age 10. Nearly one-quarter were doing well in four of those areas.

The res...

Got Your COVID Vaccine? Don't Stop Being Cautious, Experts Say

Just because you've had your COVID-19 vaccination doesn't mean you can stop taking steps to protect yourself and others, experts say.

So far, only about 16% of Americans have been fully vaccinated, and on March 24, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 6.7% increase in the seven-day average number of daily cases, compared to the prior week.

About 60,000 peo...

Boys Who Spend Lots of Time Online More Likely to Cyberbully

Here's yet another reason to keep your teenager from spending countless hours online and on popular social media: New research suggests it increases cyberbullying, particularly among teen boys.

"There are some people who engage in cyberbullying online because of the anonymity and the fact that there's no retaliation," said lead investigator Amanda Giordano. She is an associate professor...

Bored & Stressed, Smokers Smoked More  During Pandemic

Pandemic-related stress has prompted many smokers to light up more often, new research shows, while others smoked more because they could.

"Working at home allows me to smoke at will rather than being in a smoke-free environment for 8 hours per day," one study participant told researchers.

Whatever the reason, any increase in smoking could put these people at greater risk of depende...

Even Before Lockdowns, Young Americans Were Having Less Casual Sex

Despite being the dating-app generation, young adults are largely saying no to casual sex, and less drinking and more video games are two reasons why, a new study suggests.

Surveys in recent years have been finding that compared with past generations, today's young adults are not as interested in "hooking up."

The new study is no exception: It found that between 2007 and 2017, the n...

Why 'Night Owl' Women Might Be at Higher Risk During Pregnancy

Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy have a higher risk of complications for themselves and their babies if they're night owls instead of early birds, a new study finds.

Gestational diabetes increases the mother's risk of premature delivery and preeclampsia (pregnancy-induced high blood pressure). It also raises the baby's risk of growing too large in the womb or having breathing p...

Study Finds Growing Acceptance of COVID Vaccine by U.S. Health Care Workers

Health care workers were just as uneasy as everyone else when COVID-19 vaccines were about to be approved in the United States, with large numbers hesitant to take the shot in early December, a new study reveals.

But that hesitancy dwindled over the next few weeks, as health system employees learned more about the safety and efficacy data gathered during clinical trials of the vaccines, r...

Ultra-Processed Foods Are Ultra-Bad for Your Heart

More than half of the food Americans eat is "ultra-processed" -- and it's making them sick.

Higher consumption of these highly processed foods is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, according to a new study, and yet they account for 58% of calories in a U.S. diet. Each additional serving increased the risk.

You might not even realize that a food yo...

Lockdowns Gave Boost to Type 1 Diabetes Control in Kids

Blood sugar levels in youngsters with type 1 diabetes improved during Britain's first national COVID-19 pandemic lockdown, researchers say.

"Children and families found it easier to manage this disease when they were forced to stay at home. This helps us to understand the pressure that is put on patients and families when trying to live normal busy lives with activities outside of the hom...

Does Too Much 'Screen Time' Have Your Preschooler Acting Out?

Preschoolers who spend a lot of time watching movies and shows on TVs and other screens are more likely to develop emotional and behavioral problems by age 5, a Finnish study warns.

But despite their reputation, video games did not appear to promote any emotional problems in youngsters, researchers concluded.

"We found that high levels of screen time at the age of 1.5 years is relat...

Virtual Learning Has Taken a Toll on Kids' & Parents' Mental Health

A new government report confirms what many moms and dads already know: Parents and kids are struggling mightily to cope with the stresses of distance learning.

A survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of parents of children aged 5 to 12 found that parents of kids receiving in-person instruction were less likely to suffer from stress than those whose school...

You've Had Your Vaccine, What Can You Safely Do Now?

The U.S. COVID-19 vaccination program is proceeding apace, with more than one-fifth of adult Americans having received at least one dose and eligibility opening up for everyone by May 1, under orders from President Joe Biden.

That means the fully vaccinated now have one pressing question: What can I do now that I haven't been able to do before?

In a new

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 19, 2021
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  • Full Page
  • Lockdowns Are Putting People With Eating Disorders in Crisis

    At Eating Recovery Center, which offers treatment and services for people who have eating disorders, intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs were switched to virtual when the pandemic began.

    But that didn't sit well with people who were working on their recovery.

    "Our patients said, 'You can't do this. This is not enough support for us,'" said Ellen Astrachan-Fletc...

    Some Folks Do Age Slower Than Others

    People really do vary in how fast they age, and the divergence starts in young adulthood, a new study suggests.

    The researchers found that by the tender age of 45, people with a faster pace of "biological aging" were more likely to feel, function and look far older than they actually were. And that relative sprint toward old age began in their 20s.

    The findings, the study authors sa...

    Adult ADHD Can Mean Fewer Jobs, Worse Pay

    A new study finds that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continues to hamper people long after childhood ends. Researchers found that adults with ADHD often have a harder time holding their own in the workforce.

    High school graduates with ADHD earn about 17% less than their peers without ADHD, are more likely to have stints of unemployment and to receive disability benefits...

    How Bad Was COVID in Your State? Governor's Party Affiliation Was Key

    Could whether your governor is a Democrat or a Republican have influenced how many coronavirus cases and deaths your state has seen during the pandemic?

    Yes, claim researchers who discovered a strong link between the two -- by late last summer, the odds of dying from COVID-19 was nearly twice as high in states whose governors were Republicans versus states with Democratic governors....

    Clocks 'Spring Forward' on Sunday: Be Prepared

    Many people dread the switch to daylight saving time. When you're losing an hour of sleep, it can be hard to actually feel like springing forward.

    Dr. Rachel Ziegler, a sleep medicine physician from the Mayo Clinic Health System in Fairmont, Minn., offers some tips for easing into the time change before it happens on March 14.

    Ziegler recommends getting to bed 15 minutes early now, ...

    Many More Older Americans Willing to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll

    Older Americans are far more willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine than they were last fall, a new survey shows.

    The survey was conducted in late January. It found that 71% of adults aged 50 to 80 said they're ready to get vaccinated when a dose is available to them, or that they'd already been vaccinated.

    That's a significant increase from 58% last October found by the National Poll on...

    COVID Lockdowns Got People Smoking More

    The pandemic's spring lockdowns last year triggered an unwelcome side effect: New research shows more Americans turned to tobacco and nicotine as they struggled with boredom, anxiety and the disruption of regular routines.

    Between April and May 2020, the study authors conducted telephone interviews with U.S. adults who use cigarettes or e-cigarettes.

    During the survey period, nearly...

    When Facebook, Twitter Flag Posts as 'Unverified,' Readers Listen

    Readers pay attention when social media sites label an article as "unverified" or "suspicious," a new study suggests.

    But how an article is presented -- including author credentials and writing style -- doesn't affect readers' views about its credibility.

    The findings show that big tech companies such as Facebook and Twitter have a responsibility to combat the spread of misleading a...

    Is Your Teen Unmotivated at School? That Might Change

    If your teen seems disinterested in school, new research suggests there's a good chance that things will get better over time.

    "Our results point to a more hopeful picture for students who start out with lower levels of motivation," said study senior author Kui Xie, a professor of educational studies at Ohio State University in Columbus

    The study included 1,670 students at 11 public...

    Social Media, Binge Eating Often Go Together for Kids

    Could endless hours spent scrolling through social media and watching TV trigger binge eating in preteens?

    Apparently so, new research suggests.

    "Children may be more prone to overeating while distracted in front of screens. They may also be exposed to more food advertisements on television," said study author Dr. Jason Nagata. He is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Unive...

    Stressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't Working

    For Morgan Compton, 7, who has attended school remotely for nearly a year, the stress of the pandemic manifests itself in meltdowns.

    On one particular day, Morgan "threw a fit and decided to go upstairs," said her mother, Tracy Compton. Hearing the sound of his daughter's tears, Compton's husband, John, who also works from home, got involved.

    Meltdowns are familiar to any paren...

    Want Less Violent Prisons? Plant More Trees

    It's already known that green space offers significant benefits in institutional settings, such as hospitals and schools, but new research suggests it may also reduce violence in prisons.

    In the new study, researchers compared the amount of trees, lawns and shrubs at prisons in England and Wales with data on violence between prisoners, prisoner assaults on staff and prisoner self-harm.

    Education Level Now Prime Driver of COVID Vaccine Hesitancy: Poll

    In the early weeks of the U.S. vaccine rollout, race looked like it would determine who was willing to get a shot in the arm, but education level now plays the most powerful role in that decision, new research shows.

    More than three-quarters of adults with at least a bachelor's degree have been vaccinated or plan to be, compared to 53% of those without a college degree, according to a new...

    Masks Vital to Stopping COVID at Gyms, Studies Show

    If you think you can safely exercise without your mask in a gym during the pandemic, two new government reports show you are mistaken.

    Coronavirus outbreaks at fitness centers in Chicago and Honolulu last summer were likely the result of exercisers and instructors not wearing masks, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered.

    In the Chicago study...

    'Night Owls' Perform Worse at Work, Study Finds

    "Early to bed, early to rise" may be good advice for your career. New research finds that, compared to night owls, folks with earlier bedtimes perform better at work and are less plagued by disabilities that lead to early retirement.

    Overall, "night owls" were twice as likely as "early birds" to underperform at work, the new study found. Folks who stayed up late also ran a heightened risk...

    Many Older Adults Confused About Proper Use of Antibiotics: Poll

    Many older Americans lack knowledge about antibiotics, with some admitting to using leftover medication, a new survey reveals.

    More than 2,200 adults, aged 50 to 80, were questioned. Nine out of 10 said they're cautious about using antibiotics, and nearly that number knew that overuse of the drugs can lead to them becoming ineffective, according to the University of Michigan National Poll...

    From Sourdough to Sacrifice, How COVID Is Changing Americans' Values

    As the COVID-19 pandemic transformed everyday lives in 2020, Americans began dwelling on a few key topics, sourdough bread among them.

    But we were also tweeting about and researching sacrifice, survival and death, according to new research on online trends.

    Researchers analyzed how Google searches and the phrasing of a half-billion words and phrases on Twitter, blogs and internet fo...

    Short Course of Psychotherapy Can Help Ease Panic Disorder

    New research offers up hopeful news for the millions of people struggling with panic disorder. Two relatively brief types of psychotherapy can help alleviate the often-debilitating symptoms of this anxiety disorder.

    Fully 70% of people showed improvements in panic disorder symptoms and 45% were symptom-free in about 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or psychodynamic therapy.<...

    Lockdowns Are Leaving Kids With ADHD in Crisis

    When clinical psychologist Maggie Sibley thinks about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, she worries most about the older teens who may drop out of high school and those kids who may be experiencing depression.

    It would be hard to argue that this year hasn't been difficult for everyone, and that may be even mor...

    Philly Study Finds Lockdowns Linked to Spike in Gun Violence

    After the coronavirus pandemic forced the city of Philadelphia to go into lockdown, gun violence rapidly escalated, a new study finds.

    It's known that many U.S. cities saw a spike in gun violence in 2020, a year marked not only by the pandemic but also widespread protests following the police killing of George Floyd.

    In the new study, researchers found that after Philadelphia closed...

    Health Care After COVID: A New Focus on Infectious Diseases

    When New York City was the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic last spring in the United States, nearby Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital was treating more than 400 COVID-19 patients at one time, remembers Dr. Aaron Glatt.

    Infectious disease experts had warned for years about the potential for another pandemic, yet the scale of this pandemic was unprecedented according to Glatt, wh...

    Handgun Ownership Raises Odds for Gun Suicide

    Owning a handgun increases a person's risk of firearm-related suicide more than owning a shotgun, a new study finds.

    Researchers surveyed surviving loved ones of 121 gun owners who had died by suicide, including 93 who died by a firearm and 28 by other means.

    The survey respondents were asked about the types and numbers of firearms the person who died had owned.

    According to t...

    Daytime Napping May Be in Your Genes

    If you like to take a snooze in the afternoon, your genes may explain your love of daytime naps, researchers say.

    For their study, investigators analyzed data from the UK Biobank, which contains genetic information from nearly 453,000 people who were asked how often they nap during the day.

    The genome-wide association study identified 123 regions in the human genome that are associa...

    Is Any Amount of Coffee Safe for Baby During Pregnancy?

    Too much coffee during pregnancy could lead to kids with behavior problems later on.

    That's the key takeaway from new research that examined 9,000 brain scans from 9- and 10-year-olds as part of the largest long-term study of brain development and child health.

    "The goalposts are moved by caffeine, and there are subtle, but real changes in behavioral outcomes in most kids who were e...

    AHA News: Hoping to Find Out Her Baby's Sex, She Learned of a Serious Heart Defect

    Latisha Wilborne was excited. She and her husband had tried for a year to get pregnant, and now, 20 weeks pregnant, she was at a doctor's visit with her two sisters where an ultrasound would determine if she was having a girl or boy. A party to celebrate the news was just days away.

    The happy mood changed when the doctor told Latisha they detected a problem with the baby's heart.

    "I...

    Dating on V-Day? Why Some Are Better at a Good First Impression

    Valentine's Day is Sunday and even amid a pandemic the search for love continues. When dating, will potential suitors think you're a prince or a frog?

    That may depend on how genuinely happy you are with yourself and how well you present yourself, new research shows.

    The new study from McGill University says first impressions during a first date can accurately assess another pe...

    As Mask-Wearing Prevails, People Are Adapting to Understanding Speech

    As face masks have become the norm during the coronavirus pandemic, people have learned to communicate more clearly with their mouth covered, new research finds.

    For the study, researchers asked participants to record sentences in three speech styles -- casual, clear and positive-emotional -- while they were masked and unmasked.

    Background noise was added to a variety of the sentenc...

    When Kids Misbehave, 'Verbal Reasoning' Can Sometimes Backfire

    Most parents know that child behavior experts recommend against spanking, but new research suggests that so-called "positive" discipline methods don't always work either.

    For example, the common tactic of "verbal reasoning" with an unruly child "was associated with a mixed bag of outcomes, some positive and some negative," said study author Andrew Grogan-Kaylor. He's a professor of socia...

    Pandemic May Be Affecting How Parents Feed Their Kids

    There have been good and bad changes to U.S. children's diets during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say.

    "Providing healthy meals and snacks to our kids can be a challenge even when we're not experiencing a pandemic," said senior study author Susan Carnell. She's an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimo...

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