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Results for search "Alzheimer's".

07 May

Eating A Mediterranean Diet Helps Prevent The Loss Of Brain Function, Study Finds

Following a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and olive oil may protect your brain against protein build-up and shrinkage related to Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

27 Jul

Two Common Vaccinations Appear To Lower The Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease

Both the flu and pneumonia vaccines may help protect against cognitive decline.

Health News Results - 179

Eat Smart: Mediterranean Diet Could Ward Off Dementia

THURSDAY, May 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A diet rich in vegetables, fruits, olive oil and fish -- the so-called Mediterranean diet -- may protect the brain from plaque buildup and shrinkage, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Germany looked at the link between diet and the proteins amyloid and tau, which are a hallmark of Alzheimer's but are also found in the brains ...

Higher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: Study

TUESDAY, April 27, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- That college degree may be useful in many ways, but new research suggests it probably won't keep your brain from shrinking with age.

Over the years, a number of studies have suggested that education might buffer people against age-related declines in memory and thinking. But those findings did not prove a cause-and-effect rela...

Head Injury, Alzheimer's Appear to Affect Brain in Similar Ways

Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury appear to affect the brain in similar ways, according to a study that may point to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"These findings are the first to suggest that cognitive impairment following a traumatic brain injury is useful for predicting the magnitude of Alzheimer's-like brain degradation," said study author Andr...

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims.

Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than those in affluent neighborhoods.

""Worldwide, dementia is a major cause of illness and a devastating diagnosis," said study author Dr. Amy Kind, of the University of ...

Research Shows Links Between Gum Disease and Alzheimer's

Don't forget to floss: New research adds to evidence linking gum disease with Alzheimer's disease.

The mouth is home to both harmful bacteria that promote inflammation and healthy, protective bacteria, the study authors explained.

In the new study, the researchers found that people who have more harmful than healthy gum bacteria were more likely to also have a protein marker for Al...

Assisted Living Centers Can Do More for Dementia Patients, Experts Say

U.S. assisted living facilities often have activities to keep seniors socially engaged -- but a new study says they need to ensure that residents with dementia are not left out.

Researchers observed residents and staff at four assisted living communities over the course of a year.

They found that a few factors stood out as key to keeping residents with dementia socially and mentally...

6 Steps to Reduce Caregiver Stress

Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease can be mentally and physically exhausting, so you should take steps to manage and reduce stress, according to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.

"Finding ways to manage and reduce stress is of paramount importance for every Alzheimer's caregiver. Untreated stress can lead to physical, mental and emotional caregiver burnout," Jennifer Ree...

Loneliness in Mid-Life Linked to Higher Odds for Alzheimer's

Middle-aged folks who feel persistently lonely appear to have a nearly doubled risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease, a new study reports.

If you take steps to counter your loneliness, however, you might actually reduce your dementia risk, the researchers found.

Dementia risk rose 91% in those who reported feelings of loneliness that persisted across two separate health...

'Zombie Genes' Spur Some Brain Cells to Grow Even After Death

When people die some cells in their brains go on for hours, even getting more active and growing to gargantuan proportions, new research shows.

Awareness of this activity, spurred on by "zombie genes," could affect research into diseases that affect the brain.

For the study, researchers analyzed gene expression using fresh brain tissue collected during routine surgery and found that...

Exercise Boosts Blood Flow to Brain, Keeping it Sharp

Regular aerobic exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which may help slow mental decline in older adults, a new, small study suggests.

Researchers from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at 70 men and women diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This means there are slight changes to the brain that affect memory, decision-making or reasoning skills. In m...

Suicide Attempts Spike Soon After Dementia Diagnosis

A new study shows just how devastating a diagnosis of mental decline can be: Researchers found that rates of suicide rise sharply in the months after such news is delivered.

The study of almost 148,000 older U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs patients, mostly men, looked at diagnoses for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is often (but not always) a precursor to dementia.

"Risk...

Unhealthy in Your 20s? Your Mind May Pay the Price Decades Later

If you're a 20-something who wants to stay sharp, listen up: A new study suggests poor health habits now may increase your risk of mental decline later in life.

Its authors say young adulthood may be the most critical time for adopting a healthy lifestyle in order to keep your brain sharp when you're older.

That's the upshot of an analysis of data from about 15,000 adults who were p...

Could a New Drug Help Ease Alzheimer's?

About 7 out of 10 Alzheimer's patients wound up free of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of the disease after treatment with a potentially breakthrough experimental drug, clinical trial results show.

The drug, donanemab, also significantly slowed the patients' brain decline, according to findings published March 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Donanemab diss...

Many Blacks, Hispanics Believe They'll Get Worse Care If Dementia Strikes

Black and Hispanic Americans already face higher risks for dementia than the general population. Many also believe they'd get worse dementia care compared to white patients, according to a new Alzheimer's Association special report.

Older Black Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer's or another form of dementia as older white people, and older Hispanics are about 1.5 times...

Alzheimer's May Strike Women and Men in Different Ways

The ravages of Alzheimer's may strike later in women than men, but once it takes hold women tend to deteriorate far faster than men, according to a new study.

Something known as cognitive reserve helps the aging brain function better for longer, and researchers report that women appear to have more of it than men. But once the reserve runs out, mental decline in women speeds up.

"Wo...

History of Mental Illness Tied to Earlier Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

People with Alzheimer's disease often have a history of depression or anxiety, which might mean an earlier emergence of memory and thinking problems, a preliminary study suggests.

Researchers found that of 1,500 Alzheimer's patients at their center, 43% had a history of depression, while almost one-third had a history of anxiety disorders.

Those patients also tended to be diagnosed ...

Why Some 'Super Ager' Folks Keep Their Minds Dementia-Free

Researchers may have uncovered a key reason some people remain sharp as a tack into their 80s and 90s: Their brains resist the buildup of certain proteins that mark Alzheimer's disease.

The study focused on what scientists have dubbed "super agers" -- a select group of older folks who have the memory performance of people decades younger.

Compared with older people who had average b...

AHA News: Black, Hispanic Families Hit Hardest by Dementia

It can begin with the occasional missed bill payment. An inability to remember names. Telling the same story repeatedly. There may be personality changes or mood swings. Confusion. Over time, it's as if the person who once was slowly disappears.

Dementia. As the population ages, a growing number of families face this debilitating condition, which can be both emotionally and financially ex...

Dementia Seen in Younger Adults Shows Even More Brain Damage Than Alzheimer's

White matter damage in the brains of adults with frontotemporal dementia is even greater than that seen in Alzheimer's disease patients, a new study shows.

Frontotemporal dementia often affects people younger than 65, mainly causing personality and behavior changes and problems with language, rather than memory. The researchers assessed areas of brain damage called white matter hyperinten...

What Causes Herpes Cold Sore Flare-Ups? New Study Offers Clues

Scientists may have discovered why cold sores caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) are triggered by stress, illness and sunburn.

The finding could lead to new ways to prevent recurring cold sores and herpes-related eye disease, U.S. and British researchers say.

More than half of Americans are infected with herpes simplex virus. It is spread through close contact with someone wh...

'Prediabetes' May Be Harming Your Brain, Study Finds

"Prediabetes" -- where blood sugar levels are high but not yet tipped over into full-blown diabetes -- may pose a threat to brain health, new British research suggests.

"As an observational study, it cannot prove higher blood sugar levels cause worsening brain health. However, we believe there is a potential connection that needs to be investigated further," said study lead author Victori...

Specialist Care for Alzheimer's Is Tough to Find for Poorer, Rural Americans

Although Alzheimer's disease is a devastating diagnosis that is better delivered earlier rather than later, new research suggests poor patients living in rural areas may not have access to the specialists who could spot the first signs of memory declines.

The team from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., led by Sayeh Nikpay, now an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota...

If Blood Pressure Rises at Night, Alzheimer's Risk Might Rise, Too

Older men whose blood pressure rises at night may be at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Blood pressure changes over 24 hours. It typically goes up during the day and dips at nighttime. But some people have an opposite pattern, which is called reverse dipping.

"The night is a critical period for brain health. For example, in animals, it has previously be...

Tony Bennett's Struggle With Alzheimer's Revealed

As Tony Bennett releases what may well be his last album, his family has disclosed that the 1950s crooner who became popular with younger audiences decades later has Alzheimer's disease.

His wife, Susan, made the announcement in an interview published in AARP magazine. She said Bennett, 94, is content and happy and took the diagnosis calmly.

"But that's because he already d...

Fluid-Filled Spaces in the Brain Linked to Worsening Memory: Study

Enlarged spaces in the brain that fill with fluid around small blood vessels may be a harbinger of impending dementia, a new Australian study suggests.

Typically, these so-called perivascular spaces help clear waste and toxins from the brain and might be linked with changes in the aging brain, researchers say.

"Dilated perivascular spaces, which are a common MRI finding, especi...

COVID Vaccine Advised for Alzheimer's Patients, Their Caregivers

All Alzheimer's disease patients and their family caregivers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America says.

"Getting vaccinated is one of the most important steps families affected by Alzheimer's disease can take to protect themselves and their loved ones," said Dr. J. Wesson Ashford, chair of the foundation's medical, scientific and memory screening ad...

Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory Loss

A rare brain disease that causes loss of language skills doesn't lead to memory loss, a new study finds.

The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. Their study was published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology.

"While we knew that the memories of people with prima...

How Are 'Super Agers' Protected From Alzheimer's and Mental Decline?

Some older folks are still sharp as tacks and dementia-free well into their 80s and beyond. Now German researchers have uncovered a possible reason why: Their genes may help them fend off protein build-up in the brain.

The finding is based on a study of brain images of 94 participants, all aged 80 or older. They were characterized by the amount of tau protein tangles and beta-amyloid prot...

Caregivers Feeling the Strain This Tough Holiday Season

The coronavirus pandemic makes the holidays even more difficult for caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, an expert says.

"Even in the best of times, holidays can be a mixed bag for families who are caring for a loved one with an age-related illness that causes physical and mental changes. Focus on family togetherness and joy," said Mary Catherine ...

Years Before Diagnosis, People With Alzheimer's Lose Financial Acumen

Even before signs of Alzheimer's disease or dementia appear, people are prone to make poor financial decisions, a new study finds.

Older people diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer's were more likely to miss credit card payments as early as six years before their diagnosis, compared with similar people without dementia (about 8% versus 7%), the researchers found.

Patients with demen...

Could Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?

Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal "plaque" accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air po...

Anxiety Might Speed Alzheimer's: Study

Older adults with memory problems may progress to Alzheimer's more quickly if they are also suffering from anxiety symptoms, a preliminary study suggests.

It's common for people with Alzheimer's disease to have mood symptoms, including anxiety and depression. And some research has suggested those symptoms can, in older people, act as early indicators of the dementia process.

The new...

Air Pollution May Harm Older Women's Brains

Pollutants in the air -- fine particulates that are 30 times smaller than the width of a strand of hair -- may be damaging older women's brains.

In a new study, researchers linked breathing in high levels of this polluted air to shrinkage in areas of the brain that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease.

"Fine-particle pollution is kind of like a cocktail. There are a lot of differen...

Upbeat Outlook Could Shield Your Brain

Being positive may help protect your memory as you age, a new study indicates.

Researchers analyzed data from almost 1,000 middle-aged and older U.S. adults who took part in a national study. The upshot: Being upbeat pays dividends.

Participants were assessed three times: between 1995 and 1996, 2004 and 2006, and 2013 and 2014. At each assessment, the participants describe...

Staying Active as You Age Not a Guarantee Against Dementia

Experts in healthy aging often cite the importance of leisure activities -- hanging out with friends, playing games, taking classes -- in maintaining your brain health as you grow older.

But a new study calls into question whether those enjoyable pursuits actually protect you against dementia.

Researchers found no link between middle-aged folks taking part in leisure activities and ...

Fading Sense of Smell Could Signal Higher Death Risk in Older Adults

If you're a senior who can't smell onions, smoke, chocolate or natural gas, it's time to see your doctor.

Seniors who lose their sense of smell -- which doctors call olfactory dysfunction -- have higher odds of dying from all causes within five years, new research shows. Scientists had previously found a link between olfactory dysfunction and impaired thinking and memory.

"We ...

Smog Tied to Raised Risk for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Disease

As the air people breathe gets dirtier, their odds for serious neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and other dementias rises, new research shows.

The long-term study of more than 63 million older Americans can't prove cause and effect, but does show a strong association between air pollution and brain disorders. The researchers said the link was seen even a...

Poor Brain Blood Flow Might Spur 'Tangles' of Alzheimer's

Offering fresh insight into the deep-seated roots of dementia, new research finds that diminished blood flow to the brain is tied to buildup a protein long associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Called "tau," high levels of the protein are "one of the hallmark pathologies that define Alzheimer's disease in the brain," explained study author Judy Pa. She is an associate professor of neur...

A-Fib Treatment Reduces Patients' Dementia Risk

A procedure to restore normal heart rhythm is more effective than medications in reducing dementia risk in people with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (AF), researchers report.

Previous studies have shown that AF is associated with an increased risk of dementia. This one assessed whether catheter ablation and medications for AF reduced that risk.

In catheter ab...

Fall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early Stages

In older people a fall can sometimes be a sign of oncoming Alzheimer's disease, even in the absence of mental issues, new research suggests.

Although falls are common among older people, in some cases they can be a sign of hidden mental problems that can lead to dementia, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Older people who hav...

New Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's Risk

A genetic variant in some people may be associated with mental decline that can't be explained by deposits of two proteins linked with Alzheimer's disease, researchers say.

They said their findings could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's.

The two proteins are amyloid β and tau. Amyloid forms into plaques and tau forms into tangles. Both are found in the brains of A...

Is Rural Appalachia a Hotspot for Alzheimer's?

Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian areas of Ohio than in other rural parts of the state, new research shows.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 11 years of Medicare data, ending in 2017, and found that Alzheimer's rates were 2% to 3% higher in rural Appalachian counties than in other rural counties in Ohio.

The study, published online rece...

Depression Can Deepen Over Time for Alzheimer's Caregivers

Add a heightened risk for depression to the list of challenges facing the caregivers of loved ones who have Alzheimer's disease.

A new study found that older adults caring for spouses newly diagnosed with Alzheimer's had a 30% increase in symptoms of depression compared to those whose spouses didn't have Alzheimer's or related dementia.

And with care often lasting for y...

Common Meds Tied to Faster Mental Decline in Seniors

A group of widely used medications might speed up older adults' mental decline -- especially if they are at increased risk of dementia, a new study hints.

The medications in question are called anticholinergics, and they are used to treat a diverse range of conditions -- from allergies, motion sickness and overactive bladder to high blood pressure, depression and Parkinson's disease.<...

Do Your Sleep Patterns Affect Your Risk of Alzheimer's Disease?

Disturbed sleep doesn't cause Alzheimer's disease, but some sleep patterns may be more common in people who have a high genetic risk for it, a new study reports.

Those patterns include being a morning person, having shorter sleep duration and being less likely to have insomnia, according to findings published in the Aug. 19 online issue of the journal Neurology.

"We ...

Why Are Dementia Patients Getting Risky Psychiatric Drugs?

As many as 3 in 4 older adults with dementia have been prescribed drugs that may pose a risk to them, researchers report.

The drugs in the study included commonly prescribed medications that can affect the brain or nervous system, such as sedatives, painkillers and antidepressants.

"There just is not a lot of evidence that these medications are helpful in people with dement...

Can Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?

As researchers hone in on ways to detect whether someone has a high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before they have any symptoms, mental health professionals have worried what the psychological fallout of that knowledge might be.

But new research suggests that people can handle the truth.

In the study, seniors who didn't have any Alzheimer's symptoms underwent a sp...

Are Baby Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?

Aging baby boomers may not be as mentally sharp as their parents were, a new study suggests -- raising questions about what the pattern could mean for future dementia rates.

Looking at two decades' worth of data on U.S. adults, the study found generational differences in tests of cognitive function. That refers to essential mental abilities such as remembering, reasoning and problem-s...

More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer's

Among people who have the gene that carries a heightened risk for early-onset Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests that more education might slow the development of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain.

About 1% to 6% of people with Alzheimer's disease have genes that put them at risk for early development of the disease, which can start in their 30s to 50s, the researcher...

Under 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May Rise

Need fresh motivation to lose some weight? New research suggests that young adults who are overweight or obese face a higher risk for dementia in their golden years.

For the study, the researchers looked at just over 5,100 older adults who were involved in two long-term studies. The investigators found that women who were overweight between 20 and 49 years of age had nearly twice the ...

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