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Results for search "Aging: Misc.".

05 Aug

Making Time for Friends May Protect Your Brain Health

Being socially active in middle age may lower your risk of dementia, study finds

05 Feb

Gender and Brain Age

The female brain stays younger longer.

Health News Results - 355

Racism Linked to Faster Aging Among Blacks

The racism black Americans face may age them prematurely, a new study suggests.

This aging is occurring at the cellular level -- specifically, the shortening of telomeres, researchers say.

Telomeres are the repetitive sequences of DNA that sit at the tips of your chromosomes -- like the plastic caps at the ends of a shoelace -- and help keep the chromosomes from fraying. <...

Could a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?

If you want to slow down the aging process, it might not hurt to replace whole milk with skim, new research suggests.

The study of over 5,800 U.S. adults found that those who regularly indulged in higher-fat milk had shorter telomeres in their cells -- a sign of accelerated "biological aging."

The findings do not prove that milk fat, per se, haste...

All in the Timing: Many Get Knee Replacement Too Late or Too Soon

It's a question many aging Americans face: Is it time to replace my aching knee, or should I wait?

New research suggests that for far too many patients, the procedure is done either too late or too soon.

Much of the success of knee replacement surgery for knee osteoarthritis depends on timing, but a team at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago fou...

A Lifetime of Fitness Helps Women's Muscles in Old Age

Women who exercise throughout life may keep their muscle power as they age, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., examined muscle strength, power and the size and type of muscle fibers in the thighs of three groups of women.

Seven women in one group were over 70 and had exercised regularly for nearly 50 years. The seco...

Want a Long, Healthy Old Age? A Healthy Middle Age Helps

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

Want to Turn Back the Aging Clock? Train for a Marathon

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

More Doubt That Plaques in the Brain Cause Alzheimer's

For decades, scientists have known that Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by the buildup of clumps of amyloid protein between brain cells. Could these plaques be causing the disease?

That's been a prevailing theory driving Alzheimer's research for years. But a new study suggests the strategy could be wrong.

Researchers reporting Dec. 30 in the journal Neurology have...

Fatty Diets Tied to Leading Cause of Vision Loss in Seniors

Diets heavy in red meat and fatty foods could help spur a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, new research suggests.

The study found that people who ate more typical Western diets were three times more likely to develop an eye condition that robs you of your central vision -- late-stage age-related macular degeneration.

"What you ea...

Caring for Grandkids Might Help Stave Off Loneliness

Caring for a grandchild might be the best way to fight the isolation of old age, new research suggests.

This conclusion is based on 2014 data collected as part of an ongoing German survey of older adults.

Among the nearly 3,900 grandparents in the survey, more than 1,100 said they cared for a grandchild. Those who had grandchildren to care for had lower scores on loneliness...

Special Handling Needed for Seniors in Cardiac ICU

Seniors in cardiac intensive care units may suffer delirium and other problems if doctors only focus on their heart, a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement says.

Older adults in the cardiac ICU require different care from younger patients, according to the statement. They're likely to be frail, have other medical conditions and use multiple medications.

Have a Purpose, Have a Healthier Life

Do you feel like you know why you're here?

The answer to that question could determine how you feel day-to-day.

If you've found meaning in your life, you're more likely to be both physically and mentally healthy, a new study reports.

On the other hand, people restlessly searching for meaning in their life are more likely to have worse mental well-being, with their ...

An 'Epidemic of Loneliness' in America?  Maybe Not

Despite media stories about a "loneliness epidemic" plaguing the elderly, two new studies find that they feel no more lonely than their peers from past generations.

The studies -- one in the United States, one in the Netherlands -- reached the same basic conclusion: Yes, people tend to feel more lonely after age 75 or so. But today's older adults are no more likely to feel isolated or...

Who's More Apt to Be a Narcissist -- the Young or the Old?

Know any folks who are just too full of themselves? Rest assured: They'll probably get over it eventually.

That's because narcissism tends to decline with age, according to what researchers described as the longest study ever of the personality disorder.

For the study, a Michigan State University team looked at nearly 750 people to assess how narcissism changed between ages...

How Well Are You Aging? A Blood Test Might Tell

Imagine a blood test that could spot whether you are aging too quickly.

New research suggests it's not the stuff of science fiction anymore.

The scientists analyzed plasma -- the cell-free, fluid part of blood -- from more than 4,200 people between the ages of 18 and 95, and found a link between 373 proteins and aging.

"We've known for a long time that measuring ce...

Cards, Board Games Could Be a Win for Aging Brains

Playing cards and board games like chess, bingo and Scrabble might be the mental workout you need to keep your wits as you age, Scottish researchers suggest.

People in their 70s who regularly play board games score higher on tests of memory and thinking skills than those who don't. And 70-somethings who step up their game-playing are more likely to maintai...

Life Expectancy Shrinks for America's Working-Age Adults

Despair, as evidenced in rising rates of drug abuse and suicide, may be eroding the average life expectancy of Americans, a new study finds.

Deaths among working-age adults, especially, have been increasing in the United States for decades, particularly in economically struggling parts of the nation such as the "Rust Belt" and Appalachia, the researchers reported.

These earl...

AHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain Aging

The brains of middle-age adults may be aging prematurely if they have obesity or other factors linked to cardiovascular disease, new research has found.

Almost one-quarter of adults have metabolic syndrome, a set of factors that in combination amplify a person's risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke and other illnesses. In the new research, participants were considered metabolicall...

Statins Won't Harm Aging Brains, and May Even Help

Concerns that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can impair brain health appear to be unfounded, according to new research.

"Statins won't make you stupid or cause memory loss," said lead researcher Dr. Katherine Samaras, a professor of medicine at St. Vincent's Clinical School of Medicine in Darlinghurst, Australia.

And for some people at risk of dementia, statins like L...

National Project Will Delve Into How Dogs Age

Calling all dogs! 10,000 of them, to be exact.

The 40 researchers behind the Dog Aging Project want that many of man's furry companions to be enrolled in a 10-year study of what helps canines live long, healthy lives.

"Aging is the major cause of the most common diseases, like cancer and heart problems. Dogs age more rapidly than people do and get many of our same diseases o...

Climate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report Warns

Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children's health. And they're at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the scientists re...

For Older Adults, More Exercise Lowers Heart Disease Risk

Regular exercise lowers older adults' risk of heart disease and stroke, even if they have health problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes, researchers say.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from more than 1 million people aged 60 and older in South Korea. The study participants' health was checked in 2009 to 2010, again in 2011 to 2012, and they were followed until ...

Jimmy Carter Recovering After Brain Procedure

After three falls in recent months, former President Jimmy Carter was recovering at an Atlanta hospital Tuesday morning following surgery to ease pressure on his brain caused by bleeding from those falls.

The 95-year-old "is recovering at Emory University Hospital following surgery this morning to relieve pressure on his brain from a subdural hematoma. There are no complications from ...

Want Extra Years of Life? Keep Blood Pressure Tightly Controlled

Tighter control of high blood pressure may add years to people's lives, a new study estimates.

Researchers calculated that for a typical 50-year-old with high blood pressure, more aggressive treatment could translate into three extra years of life. Eighty-year-olds would have less time to gain, but it could extend their lives by an average of 10 months, the study projected.

...

AHA News: Stroke Death Rate Increasing for Middle-Aged Americans

In more than half of all counties across the country, a growing percentage of middle-aged Americans are dying of strokes, according to a new study.

The study – which examined stroke mortality rates at the county level – reveals a statistical jump previously masked by national data showing a leveling off of stroke mortality rates following years of decline. The study was p...

Test Given at 8 May Predict Your Brain Health in Old Age

If you were good with words and puzzles at age 8, you're likely to fare well on tests of mental acuity at age 70, too.

That's among the findings of a new study that followed the thinking abilities of a group of Britons born in the 1940s. Researchers found that their performance on standard cognitive tests at age 8 predicted their performance around age 70. People who scored in the top...

Number of Americans With Dementia Will Double by 2040: Report

Nearly 13 million Americans will have dementia by 2040 -- nearly twice as many as today, a new report says.

The number of women with dementia is expected to rise from 4.7 million next year to 8.5 million in 2040. The number of men with dementia is projected to increase from 2.6 million to 4.5 million.

Over the next 20 years, the economic impact of Alzheimer's disease and oth...

For Seniors, Financial Woes Can Be Forerunner to Alzheimer's

Unpaid bills, overdrawn accounts, dwindling investments: When seniors begin experiencing fiscal troubles, early dementia or Alzheimer's disease could be an underlying cause, researchers say.

In the early stages of the disease, people with undiagnosed Alzheimer's are at high risk of making foolish and dangerous decisions about their finances, mostly because families may not know they ...

Get Moving: Exercise Can Help Lower Older Women's Fracture Risk

Older women who get even light exercise, like a daily walk, may lower their risk of suffering a broken hip, a large study suggests.

A number of studies have linked regular exercise to a lower risk of hip fracture -- a potentially disabling or even fatal injury for older adults. Each year, more than 300,000 people in the United States aged 65 or older are hospitalized for a broken hip,...

Could Screens' Blue Light Make You Old Before Your Time?

Daily exposure to blue light from sources such as smartphones, computers and household fixtures could speed your aging, even if it doesn't reach your eyes, research in animals suggests.

Blue wavelengths produced by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) may damage cells in your brain as well as your retinas, according to the Oregon State University researchers.

Their study of fruit fl...

AHA News: Lowering Blood Pressure May Prevent New Brain Lesions in Older People

Many people know treating high blood pressure reduces the odds of a heart attack, stroke or heart failure. Now, a new study suggests another added benefit: a lower risk of lesions in the brain that increase the chances of dementia, stroke and falls in older adults.

The study, published this week in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, included 199 women and men ...

Childhood Risk Factors Can Predict Adult Obesity

Certain risk factors in childhood can identify those who are more likely to suffer severe obesity in adulthood, a new study finds.

The research included more than 12,000 participants from different countries who were followed from childhood in the 1970s and 1980s into adulthood.

In childhood, 82% of the participants had normal weight, 11% were overweight, 5% were...

How Fast You Walk Might Show How Fast You're Aging

Middle-aged folks who worry about healthy aging would do well to keep an eye on their walking speed.

Turns out that the walking speed of 45-year-olds is a pretty solid marker of how their brains and bodies are aging, a new study suggests.

Slow walkers appear to be aging more rapidly, said senior researcher Terrie Moffitt, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke Un...

When Income Drops, Young Adults' Brains May Suffer

When young adults see their annual income plummet, more than their bank accounts may suffer: New research suggests their brains may eventually pay the price.

The study found that people in their 20s and 30s who experienced "income volatility" generally performed worse on tests of thinking and memory skills once they hit middle age.

Compared with their peers with more stable ...

Stroke Rate Continues to Fall Among Older Americans

Starting in the late 1980s, stroke rates among older Americans began to fall -- and the decline shows no signs of stopping, a new study finds.

The researchers found that between 1987 and 2017, the rate of stroke incidence among Americans aged 65 and older dropped by one-third per decade. The pattern has been steady, with no leveling off in recent years.

It's not completely c...

Give Seniors a Memory Check at Annual Checkups, Experts Say

Many older people show evidence of mental decline, called mild cognitive impairment, but doctors often miss this sometimes early sign of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

To help doctors get a better handle on their patients' mental state, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is urging physicians to assess patients aged 65 and older at least once a year.

The academy reco...

For People at High Risk, Evidence That Exercise Might Slow Alzheimer's

For people at risk of Alzheimer's disease, working out a couple of times a week might at least slow the onset of the illness, new research suggests.

Regular exercise over a year slowed the degeneration of the part of the brain tied to memory among people who had a buildup of amyloid beta protein in their brain. These protein "plaques" are a hallmark of Alzheimer's, noted researchers a...

Age Often Dampens Narcissists' Self-Love, Study Finds

Narcissism is not a good look at any age, but new research suggests it fades as people enter their 40s.

However, the degree of decline in narcissism varies between individuals and can be related to their career and relationships, the researchers added.

Overall, the "findings should bring comfort to those who are concerned that young people are problematically narcissistic," ...

Staying Healthy Now to Work Into Older Age

While you can take Social Security benefits at age 62 and get 75% of your maximum, waiting until you reach full retirement age (between age 66 and 67 depending on the year you were born) gets you much closer to the full amount. But the age at which Americans can collect the most dollars has inched up to 70.

The problem is that, in general, people today aren't as healthy during th...

More U.S. Teen Girls Are Victims of Suicide Than Thought, Study Finds

The gender gap in teen suicide is smaller than previously estimated, with more girls dying by suicide each year, a new study contends.

Suicide death rates among 10- to 19-year-old girls have been systematically underestimated, while rates among boys have been overestimated, according to the report published Sept. 13 in JAMA Network Open.

Experts have pegged the male-to-fe...

How to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent Fractures

If you're a young adult, start thinking about your bone health, an expert advises.

Most people reach peak bone mass -- the strongest bones they'll ever have -- between 25 and 30 years of age, according to Dr. Philip Bosha, a physician with Penn State Sports Medicine in State College, Pa.

"To some extent, genetics determines the peak, but lifestyle influences, such as diet an...

How to Fight Hidden Causes of Inflammation

Tamping down inflammation is a must for people with a chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. But you can be exposed to damaging inflammation without having a specific medical condition.

Inflammation prevents the body from adequately reacting to stressors and puts the aging process on an unwanted fast track, increasing the likelihood of problems like heart di...

Why Weight Gain Often Comes With Age

It happens to most aging Americans: Excess pounds pile on, despite efforts to eat right and exercise.

Now, research in fat cells reveals why it's so tough to stay slim as you get older. The new findings could point to new ways to treat obesity, Swedish investigators say.

A team led by Peter Arner of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm analyzed fat cells taken from 54 men a...

Who's Most Likely to Scam a Senior? The Answer May Surprise You

As people age and their mental capacities decline, they can often be targeted by scammers seeking easy cash.

But more often than not, this "financial abuse" comes not from a stranger, but from a trusted family member, research from the University of Southern California (USC) shows.

"Despite the high rates of financial exploitation perpetrated by scammers targeting older adul...

Even Age 80 Is Not Too Late to Begin Exercising: Study

Even seniors who never exercised regularly can benefit from a workout program, researchers say.

A new study found that men in their 70s and 80s who had never followed an exercise regimen could build muscle mass as well as "master athletes" -- those of the same age who had worked out throughout their lives and still competed at the top levels of their sports.

The U.K. researc...

Staying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study Shows

An upbeat view of life may increase your odds for living to a ripe old age, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a look at optimism and longevity among nearly 70,000 women and 1,400 men. It builds on earlier research linking higher levels of optimism to lower risks of chronic illness and premature death.

"This study took us further by suggesting that optimistic peo...

Dodge Dementia With Healthy Lifestyle

Seniors, here's a recipe for preventing dementia: eat well, exercise and don't smoke.

The only catch, according to a new study? If you carry genes that leave you vulnerable to the memory-robbing disease, lifestyle might not be enough.

In the study, researchers found that of over 6,300 adults aged 55 and older, those with healthy habits had a lower risk of being diagnosed wit...

Every Minute of Exercise Counts When It Comes to Longevity

Exercise, even a little of it, can lengthen your life, a new study suggests.

The Norwegian researchers also found that too much sitting was associated with a higher risk of early death.

"Developing ways to limit sedentary time and increase activity at any level could considerably improve health and reduce mortality," the study authors concluded.

In the study, the t...

Smoggy Air Might Contribute to Macular Degeneration

Tailpipe pollution might pose a real health threat to aging eyes, according to a new study out of Taiwan.

Researchers there found that exposure to high levels of two car exhaust pollutants nearly doubled the odds of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

It's one of the most common causes of vision loss in older people.

The study is the first of its kind to "demo...

Women's Mid-Life Stress Might Have Long-Term Effect on Memory

Stressful experiences in middle age are associated with greater memory loss among women later in life, but this link is not found in men, a new study says.

It included more than 900 adults who were assessed twice in the early 1980s; once between 1993 and 1996; and once between 2003 and 2004. Their average age was 47 at their third visit in the '90s.

During that visit, about ...

When Is It Time for Seniors to Hand Over the Car Keys?

Driving is a source of independence for many seniors, so determining when they should hang up the keys requires careful consideration, an expert says.

"Driving retirement is a normal part of aging, and should be carefully considered and discussed openly," said Dr. Ericka Tung, an internist and geriatrician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

"Primary care providers are u...

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