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16 Apr

Starting School Later Helps Kids Get More Sleep, Study finds

Middle and high school students see biggest improvements in sleep duration and quality with later school start times, while elementary students experience no negative impact, researchers say

15 Apr

HealthDay Now: How to curb prostate cancer

A conversation with Anna Plym, PhD, postdoctoral fellow and prostate cancer researcher at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, about what men can do to minimize the chance of developing prostate cancer

14 Apr

Should Indoor Tanning Beds Be Banned For Teens?

A universal ban on indoor tanning for teens would prevent more than 15,000 cases of deadly melanoma, researchers say.

Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus Europe

Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus Europe

Americans were living shorter lives and dying at a significantly higher rate than the citizens of wealthy European countries even before the COVID-19 pandemic struck, a new study reports.

The United States suffered more than 400,000 excess deaths in 2017 alone, pre-COVID, compared to the combined populations of France, Germany, Italy, Spai...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2021
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Rashes Can Occur After COVID Vaccine, But Dermatologists Say 'Don't Worry'

Rashes Can Occur After COVID Vaccine, But Dermatologists Say 'Don't Worry'

THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatologists liken skin to a window that can reveal what is going on inside the body, and a rash that sometimes follows a COVID-19 vaccine is one example.

When you get the shot, your immune system activates, preparing to recognize and fight off the virus in the future. This ...

  • Serena McNiff HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2021
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Scientists Create Embryos With Cells From Monkeys, Humans

Scientists Create Embryos With Cells From Monkeys, Humans

Researchers have successfully introduced human stem cells into monkey embryos in the lab, creating short-lived hybrid organisms that could prove an important step in growing human transplant organs from livestock or creating better animal models for studying human disease.

The human/monkey chimeras -- organisms that contain cells from two ...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2021
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Most Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll

Most Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: Poll

Many American teens and young adults are now embracing the chance to get COVID-19 vaccines, a new survey finds.

But youth-focused messaging will still be needed to convince a minority of those aged 14 to 24 that they should be vaccinated, the University of Michigan researchers said. Still, the good news is that more young people are ready ...

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health

AHA News: The Link Between Structural Racism, High Blood Pressure and Black People's Health

High blood pressure. Structural racism.

What do they have in common?

Researchers say they are two of the biggest factors responsible for the gap in poor heart and brain health between Black and white adults in the United States. And they are inextricably linked.

Studies show high blood pressure, also called hypertension, affect...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • April 15, 2021
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AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in Men

AHA News: Waist Size May Better Predict AFib Risk in Men

Body mass index may be more helpful in predicting the risk of a common type of irregular heartbeat in women, while waist size may better predict that risk in men, new research suggests.

The link between obesity and atrial fibrillation, or AFib – when the heart beats irregularly and often too fast – is well established. But researchers ...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • April 15, 2021
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'Magic Mushroom' Hallucinogen as Good as Antidepressants: Study

'Magic Mushroom' Hallucinogen as Good as Antidepressants: Study

THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The magic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may be at least as effective as standard medication for depression, an early clinical trial suggests.

The study of 59 patients with major depression tested the antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) against psilocybin, which is the psyc...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2021
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CDC Panel Says It Needs More Time to Study J&J Vaccine Clotting Cases

CDC Panel Says It Needs More Time to Study J&J Vaccine Clotting Cases

The fate of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine hung in the balance on Thursday after a government advisory committee said it needed more time and evidence to determine whether unusual, but severe, blood clots seen in a handful of people were caused by the vaccine.

So far, only six clotting cases have been officially reported out ...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 15, 2021
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Lower Rates of COVID in States That Mandated Masks: Study

Lower Rates of COVID in States That Mandated Masks: Study

States that required people to mask up last year had lower rates of COVID-19 than those with no mask requirements, a new study finds.

Researchers examined data from all 50 states and Washington, D.C., to assess mask policies, people's self-reported use of masks in public, and COVID rates from May through October 2020.

They factored i...

COVID Plus 'Bleeding' Stroke Doubles a Patient's Death Risk

COVID Plus 'Bleeding' Stroke Doubles a Patient's Death Risk

'Bleeding' stroke patients with COVID-19 are more than twice as likely to die as those without COVID-19, new research shows.

For the study, a research team from the University of Utah analyzed data from 568 hospitals in the United States. They compared a control group of more than 23,300 patients without COVID-19 who suffered a bleeding (h...

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Your Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your Brain

Where you live could affect your brain health as you age, a new study claims.

Specifically, it found that middle-aged and older people in poorer neighborhoods showed more brain shrinkage and faster mental decline than those in affluent neighborhoods.

""Worldwide, dementia is a major cause of illness and a devastating diagnosis," sai...

Bingeing, Stress Snacking: How the Pandemic Is Changing Eating Habits

Bingeing, Stress Snacking: How the Pandemic Is Changing Eating Habits

Americans' eating habits have changed for the worse during the COVID-19 pandemic, including an increase in eating disorders, researchers say.

For their study, the University of Minnesota team analyzed information gathered between April and May of 2020 from participants in a study called Project EAT.

The analysis found a link between ...

  • Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 15, 2021
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Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: Study

Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.

The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.

Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33 with bulimia and a control group of 30 without an eating disorder). T...

Later School Start Times Mean Better-Rested Kids: Study

Later School Start Times Mean Better-Rested Kids: Study

Starting the school day a little later helps middle and high school students get more and better sleep, according to a new study.

The research is based on annual surveys of about 28,000 elementary, middle and high school students and their parents. The surveys were completed before and two years after school start times were changed.

Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

Nurses Are Dying From Suicide at Higher Rates

WEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Before the pandemic began, suicide risk was twice as high among female nurses compared with American women as a whole, a new study warns.

Even within the health care community itself, female nurses were found to be roughly 70% more likely to die by suicide than female doctors...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2021
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Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope

Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope

WEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- One of the most dangerous complications of diabetes is a foot ulcer that won't heal, but now a preliminary study finds that a type of stem cell found in body fat may be a powerful remedy for these severe foot wounds.

The study included 63 patients with non-healing diabetic fo...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 14, 2021
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One Good Way to Help Beat COVID: Exercise

One Good Way to Help Beat COVID: Exercise

Exercise guards against a host of chronic diseases that can plague people as they age, but can it also protect against severe cases of COVID-19?

New research suggests that's so: Being physically active reduced COVID-19 patients' risk of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death, and even being just somewhat active prov...

America's STD Rate at Record High Again: CDC

America's STD Rate at Record High Again: CDC

There's another epidemic sweeping the United States: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Statistics for 2019 -- the latest data available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- show that STD rates in the United States hit a new high again for the sixth straight year.

In 2019, nearly 2.5 million Americans had ...

  • Ernie Mundell and Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporters
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  • April 14, 2021
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AHA News: 5 Things to Know This Earth Day About How the Environment Affects Health

AHA News: 5 Things to Know This Earth Day About How the Environment Affects Health

Earth Day on April 22 puts a spotlight on the planet's health which, doctors say, is closely tied to your own.

Here are five things to know about the connection.

Pollution is not a small, faraway health issue

"The footprint of pollution globally is massive," and air pollution is the biggest danger, said Dr. San...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • April 14, 2021
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A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter's Health Today

A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter's Health Today

A long-banned pesticide may be having health effects that ripple across generations, a new study suggests.

At issue is DDT, a once widely used pesticide that was banned in the United States in 1972. That ban, however, was not the end of the story.

DDT is a persistent organic pollutant, a group of chemicals that are slow to break...

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