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Recent health news and videos.

Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

16 Feb

The Power of Pets

Can pets help ease symptoms of mental illness?

15 Feb

Height and Stroke Risk

Short stature in childhood may increase stroke risk in adulthood, new study finds.

14 Feb

Chemicals and Weight

Some chemicals used in household products may cause weight gain after dieting, study finds.

Sibling Bullying Could Have Mental Health Effects

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who, as young kids, either bullied their siblings or were bullied themselves by siblings face an increased risk for psychotic disorders, a new British study suggests.

By age 18, those who'd been either the victim or the bully several times a week or month were two to three times more lik...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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Fentanyl Test Strips May Help Stem OD Deaths

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A thin test strip -- similar to a pregnancy test -- can detect whether a street drug contains the dangerous opioid fentanyl, according to a new report.

Fentanyl -- one of strongest types of opioid painkillers -- is often mixed into street drugs, such as heroin and cocaine. That makes it hard f...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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Flu Season Shows First Signs of Slowing

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While this flu season is still one of the worst seen in years, the first signs that infection rates are starting to level off were reported by U.S. health officials on Friday.

As of Feb. 10, a total of 43 states continued to experience widespread flu activity, down from 48 the week before, acco...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 16, 2018
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Pets Good Medicine for Those Battling Mental Ills

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Can the adoring gaze of a dog or the comforting purr of a cat be helpful to people with mental illness? Absolutely, new research suggests.

Although furry companions won't replace medications or therapy for mental health concerns, they can provide significant benefits, according to British rese...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • February 16, 2018
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How to Put Mass Shooting Tragedies in Perspective for Kids

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In the wake of yet another deadly school shooting in the United States, one health specialist offers advice on how to ease children's fears about acts of terror and violence.

Consider the child's age and emotional maturity when weighing the right time to discuss such tragedies, recommends Dr. H...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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After Another Shooting Tragedy, 'Stop the Bleed' Kits Urged for Schools

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some of the 17 people killed Wednesday in the senseless Florida school shooting might have survived if their bleeding could have been stopped in time, experts say.

Noting that it takes only 5 to 10 minutes for a gunshot victim to bleed to death, the American College of Surgeons has long pushed ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 16, 2018
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How to Spare Family and Coworkers Your Flu Misery

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You've caught the flu, but you have to go to work and you can't desert your family. What do you do?

Believe it or not, one expert says there are ways to stem the spread of sickness -- even if you can't avoid being around other people.

It sounds like a tall order during this brutal flu...

  • HealthDay staff
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  • February 16, 2018
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Kids Who Need Sickle Cell Meds Don't Always Get Them

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Less than a fifth of U.S. children with sickle cell anemia are getting the antibiotics that could save their lives, a new study finds.

"Longstanding recommendations say children with sickle cell anemia should take antibiotics daily for their first five years of life," the study's lead author, ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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Hey Runners, Be Sure to Choose the Right Shoes

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The only equipment you really need to go running are running shoes. But choosing a pair can often feel like a shopping marathon.

There's no shortage of big box sporting goods stores, but ask the staff at a local running club for suggestions about where to shop. The salespeople at a specialty sh...

  • Julie Davis
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  • February 16, 2018
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Dad Can Pass on Ovarian Cancer Genes, Too

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A gene mutation that's passed down from a father is associated with earlier onset of ovarian cancer in daughters and prostate cancer in the father and his sons, a new study suggests.

Previous research had shown that sisters of women with ovarian cancer have a higher risk for the disease than th...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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Could a Blood Thinner Actually Raise Stroke Risk for Some?

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Taking blood-thinning drugs is typically thought to ward off stroke in people with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation.

However, new research out of Britain hints -- but cannot prove -- that the drugs might actually raise the odds of stroke in seniors with a-fib who also have kidney...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 16, 2018
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When One Teen Vapes, Others Often Follow

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers are impressionable when it comes to e-cigarettes, new research suggests.

Nearly four out of 10 U.S. teens who use e-cigarettes said seeing others vape led them to try the devices themselves, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U...

  • Margaret Farley Steele
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  • February 15, 2018
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1 in 10 Worldwide Gets Wound Infection After Abdominal Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Globally, more than one in 10 patients develops a surgical-site infection after a gastrointestinal operation, a new study finds.

Rates vary widely, with overuse of antibiotics in poorer countries likely contributing to higher prevalence, the researchers said.

"Worldwide, large amoun...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 15, 2018
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Household Products May Pollute the Air as Much as Your Car Does: Study

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Everyday products such as perfume, skin lotion, hair spray, deodorant, household cleaners and lawn pesticides are a top source of air pollution, as damaging to air quality as the exhaust from cars and trucks, a new report shows.

Consumer products containing compounds refined from petroleum al...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • February 15, 2018
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CDC Says Flu Vaccine Just 25 Percent Effective Against Leading Strain

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Flu continues to ravage the United States in one of the worst flu seasons in recent years. And the ineffectiveness of this year's flu vaccine is partly to blame.

According to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the vaccine is only 25 percent effective again...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 15, 2018
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Another Cancer Vaccine Shows Promise In Mice

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In what researchers call a first step toward personalized vaccines for a multitude of cancers, a vaccine made from stem cells protected mice from tumors.

The vaccine was composed of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) -- which are adult cells that have been reverted back into stem cell...

Your Tax Dollars Fund Research on Hundreds of New Meds

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. National Institutes of Health spent more than $100 billion on research that led to 210 new medicines gaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval over six years, a new study shows.

Nearly $64 billion of that spending was for the development of 84 first-in-class drugs that use n...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 15, 2018
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Short as a Child, Stroke Risk as an Adult?

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers from Denmark are suggesting a potential -- and unusual -- risk factor for stroke: Being short as a kid.

The investigators found that men and women who had been about 2 inches taller than average at age 7 had, as adults, up to an 11 percent lower risk for an ischemic stroke. That's...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • February 15, 2018
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Researchers Probe Mystery of Illnesses in U.S. Cuba Embassy Personnel

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- They described hearing loud, unusual noises in either their homes or hotel rooms. Afterwards, they experienced concussion-like symptoms such as memory and thinking problems, headaches, dizziness and balance issues.

But the exact nature of what harmed more than 20 U.S. government personnel sta...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • February 15, 2018
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Obesity May Give Men With Melanoma a Survival Advantage

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obese men with advanced melanoma skin cancer seem to have a survival benefit over their slimmer peers, a new study suggests.

Among men who received treatment for the potentially deadly cancer, obese patients lived an average of 47 percent longer than those with a healthy body weight, researc...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 15, 2018
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